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Displaying posts with tag: locking (reset)
Configure Alerts on Deadlock Events

VividCortex can now detect deadlocks in MySQL, and generate events that you can use for alerting and notification. It's normal for an ACID transactional database to encounter deadlocks occasionally, but too many deadlocks could signal a variety of problems from SQL, to application behavior, to indexing and more. To learn more about deadlocks, lock waits, and the difference between them, read this article.

 

 

The first step towards solving any locking or deadlock problem is to detect it, and VividCortex detects MySQL deadlocks out-of-the-box. When a deadlock happens, VividCortex generates an event to record it. The event includes several useful pieces of information:

  • The timestamp
  • The query that was terminated to resolve the deadlock
  • The query …
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Your ORM and SELECT FOR UPDATE

If you use a programming language framework such as Django or Ruby on Rails, chances are you use an ORM to help you construct queries.

What’s an ORM?

If you’re not familiar with ORMs, an ORM is an Object-Relational Mapper, which helps you map objects in your code to tables in your database, without writing SQL. It basically writes the SQL for you, so your objects know how to store and retrieve themselves from a relational database like MySQL or Postgres.

ORMs can be a great productivity booster. Most SQL is tedious and repetitive, and maintaining it manually when you change classes (for example, adding or removing fields) is painful. Especially in the early stages of development when you aren’t sure of the final data model and you’re iterating rapidly, ORMs save a ton of work.

And frankly, ORMs make a lot of sense on an ongoing basis too, even for mature, high-traffic systems. You usually …

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MySQL NDB Cluster row level locks and write scalability

MySQL NDB Cluster uses row level locks instead of a single shared commit lock in order to prevent inconsistency in simultaneous distributed transactions. This gives NDB a great advantage over all other MySQL clustering solutions and is one reason behind cluster’s unmatched ability to scale both reads and writes. 
NDB is a transactional data store. The lowest and only isolation level available in NDB is Read Committed. There are no dirty reads in NDB and only committed rows can be read by other transactions. 
All write transactions in NDB will result in exclusive row locks of all individual rows changed during the transaction. Any other transaction is allowed to read any committed row independent of their lock status. Reads are lock-free reads.
The great advantage is that committed reads in NDB never block during writes to the same data and always the latest committed changes are read. A select doesn't block concurrent …

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The Difference Between Lock Wait Timeout And Deadlock

If you use ACID transactional databases, you’ve probably heard of lock wait timeouts and deadlocks. What are these? And how are they different?

It’s inevitable that many of us will come across these phenomena at some point. Most databases use locking strategies to make sure that data stays consistent when multiple users (or connections, or processes) are reading and modifying the data concurrently.  The locks ensure that only one operation can alter a specific portion of the data at a time as well as serializing changes to further mitigate these race conditions. Without this locking, confusing and incorrect behaviors can happen.

Lock wait timeouts and deadlocks both arise from certain locking mechanisms. A lock wait timeout results when one user gets a lock on some data and holds it while another user …

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How do UPSERT and MERGE work in Oracle, SQL Server, PostgreSQL and MySQL

Introduction Last week, Burkhard Graves asked me to answer the following StackOverflow question: And, since he wasn’t convinced about my answer: I decided to turn it into a dedicated article and explain how UPSERT and MERGE work in the top 4 most common relational database systems: Oracle, SQL Server, PostgreSQL, and MySQL. Domain Model For … Continue reading How do UPSERT and MERGE work in Oracle, SQL Server, PostgreSQL and MySQL →

The post How do UPSERT and MERGE work in Oracle, SQL Server, PostgreSQL and MySQL appeared first on Vlad Mihalcea's Blog.

InnoDB locks and transaction isolation level

What is the difference between InnoDB locks and transaction isolation level? We’ll discuss it in this post.

Recently I received a question from a user about one of my earlier blog posts. Since it wasn’t sent as a comment, I will answer it here. The question:

> I am reading your article:
> https://www.percona.com/resources/technical-presentations/troubleshooting-locking-issues-percona-mysql-webinar

> Full table scan locks whole table.

> Some bad select (read) query can do full table scan on InnoDB, does it lock whole table please?

> My understanding was that SELECT (read) blocks another DML only in MyISAM.

To answer this question, we to need understand two different concepts: locking and …

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doing nothing on modern CPUs

Sometimes you don’t want to do anything. This is understandably human, and probably a sign you should either relax or get up and do something.

For processors, you sometimes do actually want to do absolutely nothing. Often this will be while waiting for a lock. You want to do nothing until the lock is free, but you want to be quick about it, you want to start work once that lock is free as soon as possible.

On CPU cores with more than one thread (e.g. hyperthreading on Intel, SMT on POWER) you likely want to let the other threads have all of the resources of the core if you’re sitting there waiting for something.

So, what do you do? On x86 there’s been the PAUSE instruction for a while and on POWER there’s been the SMT priority instructions.

The x86 PAUSE instruction delays execution of the next instruction for some amount …

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InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight:

Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows itself as contention on the InnoDB dict_sys mutex. Now the dict_sys mutex controls access to the data dictionary. This mutex is used at various places. I will only mention a few of them:

  • During operations such as opening and closing table handles, or
  • When accessing I_S tables, or
  • During undo of a freshly inserted row, or
  • During other data dictionary modification operations such as CREATE TABLE, or
  • Within the “Persistent Stats” subsystem, among other things.

Of course this list is not exhaustive but should …

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MySQL needs single master to check data integrity

Read the original article at MySQL needs single master to check data integrity

MySQL slaves can drift out of sync. Many of our clients are surprised to find some data differences in their replication topology, once we do some checking and sniffing around. Such checks require a single reliable or authoritative master to compare against. Click through to the end for multi-master solutions that work with MySQL. Reason [...]

For more articles like these go to Sean Hull's Scalable Startups

Related posts:

  1. MySQL requires an authoritative master to build slaves
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Implications of Metadata Locking Changes in MySQL 5.5

While most of the talk recently has mostly been around the new changes in MySQL 5.6 (and that is understandable), I have had lately some very interesting cases to deal with, with respect to the Metadata Locking related changes that were introduced in MySQL 5.5.3. It appears that the implications of Metadata Locking have not been covered well, and since there are still a large number of MySQL 5.0 and 5.1 installations that would upgrade or are in the process of upgrading to MySQL 5.5, I thought it necessary to discuss what these implications exactly are.

The post Implications of Metadata Locking Changes in MySQL 5.5 appeared first on ovais.tariq.

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