Showing entries 61 to 70 of 450
« 10 Newer Entries | 10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: Insight for DBAs (reset)
The future of MySQL quality assurance: Introducing pquery

Being a QA Engineer, how would you feel if you had access to a framework which can generate 80+ crashes – a mix of hitting developer introduced assertions (situations that should not happen), and serious unforeseen binary crashes – for the world’s most popular open source database software – each and ever hour? What if you could do this running on a medium spec machine – even a laptop?

The seniors amongst you may object “But… generating a crash or assertion is one thing – creating a repeatable testcase for the same is quite another.”

Introducing pquery, mtr_to_sql, reducer.sh (the pquery-enabled version), and more:

80+ coredumps per hour. Fully automatic testcase creation. Near-100% testcase reproducibility. C++ core. 15 Seconds run time per trial. Up to 20-25k lines of SQL executed per trial. CLI testcases. Compatible with sporadic issues. High-end automation of many aspects.

It all …

[Read more]
Multi-threaded replication with MySQL 5.6: Use GTIDs!

MySQL 5.6 allows you to execute replicated events in parallel as long as data is split across several databases. This feature is named “Multi-Threaded Slave” (MTS) and it is easy to enable by setting slave_parallel_workers to a > 1 value. However if you decide to use MTS without GTIDs, you may run into annoying issues. Let’s look at two of them.

Skipping replication errors

When replication stops with an error, a frequent approach is to “ignore now and fix later.” This means you will run SET GLOBAL sql_slave_skip_counter=1 to be able to restart replication as quickly as possible and later use pt-table-checksum/pt-table-sync to resync data on the slave.

Then the day when I hit:

mysql> show slave status;
[...]
Last_SQL_Error: Worker 0 failed executing transaction '' at master log mysql-bin.000017, end_log_pos 1216451; Error 'Duplicate entry '1001' for key 'PRIMARY'' on query. …
[Read more]
Importing big tables with large indexes with Myloader MySQL tool

Mydumper is known as the faster (much faster) mysqldump alternative. So, if you take a logical backup you will choose Mydumper instead of mysqldump. But what about the restore? Well, who needs to restore a logical backup? It takes ages! Even with Myloader. But this could change just a bit if we are able to take advantage of Fast Index Creation.

As you probably know, Mydumper and mysqldump export the struct of a table, with all the indexes and the constraints, and of course, the data. Then, Myloader and MySQL import the struct of the table and import the data. The most important difference is that you can configure Myloader to import the data using a certain amount of threads. The import steps are:

  1. Create the complete struct of the table
  2. Import the data

When you execute Myloader, internally it first creates the tables executing the “-schema.sql” files and then takes all the filenames …

[Read more]
Identifying useful info from MySQL row-based binary logs

As a MySQL DBA/consultant, it is part of my job to decode the MySQL binary logs – and there are a number of reasons for doing that. In this post, I’ll explain how you can get the important information about your write workload using MySQL row-based binary logs and a simple awk script.

First, it is important to understand that row-based binary logs contain the actual changes done by a query. For example, if I run a delete query against a table, the binary log will contain the rows that were deleted. MySQL provides the mysqlbinlog utility to decode the events stored in MySQL binary logs. You can read more about mysqlbinlog in detail in the reference manual here.

The following example illustrates how mysqlbinlog displays row events that specify data modifications. These correspond to events with the WRITE_ROWS_EVENT, UPDATE_ROWS_EVENT, …

[Read more]
Hyper-threading – how does it double CPU throughput?

The other day a customer asked me to do capacity planning for their web server farm. I was looking at the CPU graph for one of the web servers that had Hyper-threading switched ON and thought to myself: “This must be quite a misleading graph – it shows 30% CPU usage. It can’t really be that this server can handle 3 times more work?”

Or can it?

I decided to do what we usually do in such case – I decided to test it and find out the truth. Turns out – there’s more to it than meets the eye.

How Intel Hyper-Threading works

Before we get to my benchmark results, let’s talk a little bit about hyper-threading. According to Intel, Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology (Intel® HT Technology) uses processor resources more …

[Read more]
Getting mutex information from MySQL’s performance_schema

We have been using SHOW ENGINE INNODB MUTEX command for years. It shows us mutex and rw-lock information that could be useful during service troubleshooting in case of performance problems. As Morgan Tocker announced in his blog post the command will be removed from MySQL 5.7 and we have to use performance_schema to get that info.

The documentation of MySQL also says that most of the command output has been removed from 5.6 and that we can find similar info in performance_schema. It doesn’t show any examples of how to use performance_schema or what is the query we need to use from now on. It is also important to mention that 5.6 doesn’t show any warning about the feature being deprecated.

This is a short blog post to show how to configure performance_schema and get the info we need. Hoping it will end …

[Read more]
Using YUM to install specific MySQL/Percona Server versions

Sometimes it is desired to use particular software versions in production, and not necessary the latest ones. There may be several reasons for that, where I think the most common is when a new version should spend some time in testing or a staging environment before getting to production. In theory each new version is supposed to be better as usually it contains a handful of bug fixes and even new or improved functionality. However there is also a risk of some regression or a new bug introduction as a side effect of code changes.

Quite often DBAs want the same MySQL version to be installed on all database instances, regardless of what actually is the latest version available in the software provider’s repository. There are several ways to achieve this:
* download specific version packages manually and then install them,
* have custom local repository mirror where you decide when and which version gets there, and just update …

[Read more]
How well does your table fit in the InnoDB buffer pool in MySQL 5.6+?

Some time ago, Peter Zaitsev posted a blog titled “How well does your table fits in innodb buffer pool?” He used some special INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables developed for Percona Server 5.1 to report how much of each InnoDB table and index resides in your buffer pool.

As Peter pointed out, you can use this view into the buffer pool to watch a buffer pool warm up with pages as you run queries. You can also use it for capacity planning. If you expect some tables need to be fully loaded in the buffer pool to be used efficiently, but the buffer pool isn’t large enough to hold them, then it’s time to increase the size of the buffer pool.

The problem, however, was that system tables change from version to version. Specifically, the INNODB_BUFFER_POOL_PAGES_INDEX table no longer exists in Percona Server 5.6, and the …

[Read more]
InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to set much larger log files and often have a much larger InnoDB Buffer Pool to work with.

First let me revisit the challenge with have with InnoDB configuration. For write-intensive workloads it is extremely important to size innodb_log_file_size for good performance, however the longer log file size you have the longer you might have to wait for InnoDB to complete crash recovery, which impacts your recovery strategy.

How much can innodb_log_file_size impact performance? Massively! Doing intensive writes to a database that well fits in memory, I’d say there’s a 10x

[Read more]
File carving methods for the MySQL DBA

This is a long overdue blog post from London’s 44con Cyber Security conference back in September. A lot of old memories were brought to the front as it were; the one I’m going to cover in this blog post is: file carving.

So what is file carving? despite the terminology it’s not going to be a full roast dinner; unless you have an appetite for data which as you’re here I’m assuming you have.

The TL;DR of “what is file carving” is taking a target blob of data (often a multi GB / TB file) and reducing it in to targeted pieces of data, this could be for instance grabbing all the jpeg images in a packet capture / mysqldump; or pulling that single table/schema out of a huge mysqldump with –all-databases (if you’re not using mydumper you really …

[Read more]
Showing entries 61 to 70 of 450
« 10 Newer Entries | 10 Older Entries »