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Displaying posts with tag: rpm (reset)
WebScaleSQL RPMs for CentOS 6

Looks like this post was rather unclear. See the bottom for how to build the rpms quickly.

WebScaleSQL was announced last week. This looks like a good thing for MySQL as it provides a buildable version of MySQL which includes multiple patches from Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, and Twitter needed by large users of MySQL, patches which have not been incorporated into the upstream source tree.  Making this more visible will possibly encourage more of these patches to be brought into the code sooner.

The source is provided as a git repo at https://github.com/webscalesql/webscalesql-5.6 and as detailed at http://webscalesql.org/faq.html the documentation says there is currently no intention to provide binaries. …

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MySQL RPMS and the new yum repository

I was really pleased to see the announcement by Oracle MySQL yum repositories that they have now produced a yum repository from where the MySQL RPMs they provide can be downloaded. This makes keeping up to date much easier. Many companies setup internal yum repositories with the software they need as then updating servers is much easier and can be done with a simple command. For many people at home that means you set this up once and don’t need to check for updates and do manual downloads, but can do a quick yum update xxxx and you get the latest version. Great!  This new yum repository only covers RHEL6 did not include RHEL5 which is not yet end of life and still used by me and probably quite a lot of other people. I filed bug#70773 to ask for RHEL5 support to be …

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On operating system upgrades and a packager’s nightmare

A fairy tale

Once upon a time I did an operating system upgrade, a minor one that should do no harm, but just get me up to date by fixing any bugs in the version I had been using. It seemed like a good idea.

All seemed to be fine. I use a package provided by an external vendor and not the one produced by the operating system provider as this vendor provides a newer version of the package and I need that. The vendor has to make his package fit in the os environment his package is built for and normally does a pretty good job.

I use automation to build my systems and when I built a new one some issues appeared. Related to the new version of the OS the provider had enhanced one of his packages and the installation pulled in new dependencies. The install of the external package I use then broke as it conflicted with the new dependency provided by the OS.  While a workaround is possible: uninstall …

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How do we control MySQL daemon in Linux, part1

As you may expect from open source world thingy, almost every Linux distribution has developed it’s own way to manage our favourite RDBMS service. Yet none is perfect, or even some of them seems to not work in real server scenario1.

In this post I’m trying to compare and point out most annoying aspects of initialization scripts that I had to face in production.

In ‘old days’ probably all Linux distributions used to start and stop services using so called init scripts usually written in Unix shell (sh or Bash). But situation is not so simple these days anymore.

Folks started to think about improving things, like making system initialization faster by parallelization of starting services. So Upstart was developed in …

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A New Platform Supported

Ever hear of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0? It was released on November the 10th of 2010 . . just over a year ago. In the last couple of days Oracle released the latest version of MySQL Server (5.5.18). Along with the bug fixes, etc they released RPM packages that cover RH EL 6.

Finally. A year later.

Not one given to griping, but really..does it take that long to roll packages for the new version? There were no significant changes in the operating system..in fact the RH EL 5 packages worked on RHEL 6 from my (albeit) limited experience with the combination.

I don't jump onto new versions of operating systems as soon as they come out. I prefer to let others be my beta testers before I put something into production. However, waiting a year seems a bit extreme for this release.

Even so, it's out now so enjoy! Now we have no excuse for not deploying 5.5.

km

 

 

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MariaDB 5.2 repository for RHEL/CentOS

Until now, MariaDB 5.2 was lacking a yum repository for easy installs and upgrades. It is now available, thanks to OurDelta.

Just follow our very simple installation instructions.

Bacula 5.0.3 binary rpms for CentOS 5 on http://postfix.wl0.org/ftp/bacula/

I’ve recently updated my CentOS 5 x86_64 rpms for bacula-5.0.3. Hope they are useful to you.

The case against using rpm packaging for MySQL

In some environments using a distro package management system may* provide benefits including handling dependencies and providing a simpler approach when there are no dedicated DBA or SA resources.

However, the incorrect use can result in pain and in this instance production downtime. Even with dedicated resources at an unnamed premium managed hosting provider, the simple mistake of assumption resulted in over 30 minutes of unplanned downtime during peak time.

One of the disadvantages of using a system such as rpm is the lack of control in managing the starting and stopping of your MySQL instance, and the second is unanticipated package dependency upgrades.

So what happened with this client. When attempting to use the MySQL client on the production server, I got the following error.

$ mysql -uxxx -p
error while loading shared libraries: libmysqlclient.so.10: cannot open shared object file: No such file or …
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Bacula 5.0.2 binary rpms for CentOS 5 on http://postfix.wl0.org/ftp/bacula/

I’ve recently updated my CentOS 5 x86_64 rpms for bacula-5.0.2.

Hope they are useful to you.

How to get your product bundled with Linux distributions

I recently received a question from Robin Schumacher at Calpont, the makers of the InfiniDB analytics database engine for MySQL: "How would you recommend we try and get bundled in with the various Linux distros?"

Since this question has come up several times before, I thought it might make sense to blog about my take on this.

First of all, please note that there is a difference between "being part of the core distribution" and "being available from a distributor's package repository". The latter one is relatively easy, the former can be hard, as you need to convince the distributor that your application is worth devoting engineering resources to maintain and support your application as part of their product. It's also a space issue – distributions need to make sure that the core packages still fit on the installation …

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