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Monitoring ProxySQL using Datadog

ProxySQL is a high performance proxy for MySQL and its forks. One of the key features is its ability to handle hundreds of thousands of connections with very low overhead. Datadog is a monitoring service for cloud-scale applications, bringing together data from servers, databases, tools, and services to present a unified view of an entire stack.

Datadog does not yet provide an integration for ProxySQL. So I decided to write an integration by forking the Datadog agent. Read my detailed blog post on TwinDB Blog to learn how to use the ProxySQL-Datadog integration.

The post Monitoring ProxySQL using Datadog appeared first on ovais.tariq.

Setup ProxySQL for High Availability (not a Single Point of Failure)

In this blog post, we’ll look at how to set up ProxySQL for high availability.

During the last few months, we’ve had a lot of opportunities to present and discuss a very powerful tool that will become more and more used in the architectures supporting MySQL: ProxySQL.

ProxySQL is becoming more flexible, solid, performant and used every day (http://www.proxysql.com/ and recent http://www.proxysql.com/compare). You can use ProxySQL for high availability.

The tool is a winner when compared to similar ones, and we should all have a clear(er) idea of how to integrate it in our architectures in order to achieve the best results.

The first thing to keep in mind is that ProxySQL doesn’t natively support any high availability solution. We can setup a cluster of …

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ProxySQL Monitoring with Datadog

Introduction

ProxySQL is a high performance proxy for MySQL and its forks. One of the key features is its ability to handle hundreds of thousands of connections with very low overhead. Some of the other key features are query caching, traffic mirroring, query routing and pluggable architecture. It is also the only open source proxy that correctly handles transactions and sessions.

What is Datadog?

Quoting Wikipedia:
Datadog is a monitoring service for cloud-scale applications, bringing together data from servers, databases, tools, and services to present a unified view of an entire stack. These capabilities are provided on a SaaS-based data analytics platform.”

We use Datadog to collect metrics of key systems of our customers. These metrics are used to analyze, alert …

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MySQL Day – Sessions review #7

Today I will present the unique ProxySQL session of the pre-FOSDEM MySQL Day. Alkin Tezuysal will share with the audience ProxySQL Use Case Scenarios

Alkin is Senior Technical Manager at Percona and has extensive experience in enterprise relational databases working in various sectors for large corporations. With more then 20 years of industry experience he has acquired skills for managing large projects from ground up to production. For the past six years he’s been focusing on e-commerce, SaaS and MySQL technologies. He managed and architected database topologies for high volume site at eBay Intl. He has several years of experience on 24X7 support and operational tasks as well as improving …

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Which backup features do you require for your MySQL database backups?
MySQL & Friends Community Dinner 2017 – Looking for sponsors

Hi dear MySQL Community,

I would like to start this post by saying thanks to our sponsors:

Unfortunately, we are missing one sponsor and to not increase the ticket price but at the same time keep the level of quality for food then promised and the same diversity for our world famous Belgian beer patrimony, we are still looking for one or two …

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MySQL Cluster up and running in less than 4 minutes

This blog is full of graphics.
A while ago I decided to try out the MySQL Cluster Auto Installer.
I have my own scripts and tools to work with MySQL Cluster so
I don't normally need to use it. But I wanted to know what it could
do and could not do. So I decided to take it for a spin.

I was actually positively surprised. It was very quick to get up and running.
Naturally as with any graphics tool it will get you to a point, if it meets issues
it can be hard to discover the issues. But there are ways to debug it as well
and naturally you have access to all MySQL log files as well as all the
NDB log files.

My personal takeaway is that the MySQL Cluster Auto Installer is a very good
tool for developing applications towards MySQL Cluster. For a production
installation I would probably want a bit more control over things and would
most likely …

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Security Vulnerability CVE-2016-6664 / CVE-2016-5617

Security Vulnerability CVE-2016-6664 / CVE-2016-5617 rasmusjohansson Wed, 01/18/2017 - 13:23

During the fall there were a couple of vulnerabilities found that could be used for privilege escalations in conjunction with race conditions. These were:

  • CVE-2016-6662 MySQL Remote Root Code Execution / Privilege Escalation 0day

  • CVE-2016-6663 Privilege Escalation / Race Condition (also referred to as CVE-2016-5616)

  • CVE-2016-6664 Root Privilege Escalation (also referred to as CVE-2016-5617)

I’ve published two blog posts about these vulnerabilities before:

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Python and the MySQL Document Store

The MySQL Document Store and X Devapi have a lot of very interesting features but right now my programming language of choice, PHP, is not yet supported. My Python is rusty and learning Node.JS is progressing. But the ability to search data from a database without knowing Structured Query Language (SQL) is going to appeal to many. Example One

import mysqlx
import string

session = mysqlx.get_session({
'host': 'localhost',
'port': 33060,
'user': 'dstokes',
'password': 'Hell0Dave!'})

schema = session.get_schema('world_x');
collection = schema.get_collection('countryinfo')

print "Find three records***\n"
result = collection.find().limit(3).execute()
docs = result.fetch_all()

for i, data in enumerate(docs):
print "{iteration}: {data}".format(iteration = i, data=data)

print "Find USA***\n"
result = collection.find('_id = "USA"').execute()
row = …
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Why I wrote "please do not ignore warnings" and "to always investigate/fix warnings" (in MySQL/MariaDB)

In a last post, I wrote the two following sentences:

please do not ignore warnings always investigate/fix warnings

I realized that without context, this might be hard to understand.  In this post, I want to give more background about these two sentences.

In my work, I have seen problems solved (wrongly) by ignoring warnings.  Some example that comes to my mind:

upgrading to a new MySQL

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