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Displaying posts with tag: NoSQL (reset)
On PostgreSQL. Interview with Bruce Momjian.

“There are four things that motivate open source development teams:
1. The challenge/puzzle of programming, 2. Need for the software, 3. Personal advancement, 4. Belief in open source”
— Bruce Momjian.

On PostgreSQL and the challenges of motivating and managing open source teams, I have interviewed Bruce Momjian, Senior Database Architect at EnterpriseDB, and Co-founder of the PostgreSQL Global Development Group and Core Contributor.


Q1. How did you manage to transform PostgreSQL from an abandoned academic project into a commercially viable, now enterprise relational database?

Bruce Momjian: Ever since I was a developer of database …

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I’m speaking at OUG Scotland this week

If you’re going to be near Edinburgh this week then consider registering for OUG Scotland. I’ll be presenting on how to acheive the benefits of NoSQL (scalability, HA, ease of use. simple APIs) while at the same time still benefiting from the RDBMS features people have grown to rely on (ACID transactions, rich schemas, flexible access patterns) – the presentation will be at 11:25 on Wednesday as part of the developers’ track.

Hint for those that can’t make it – MySQL Cluster is the key

Still the best way to explain NoSQL

Those in the MySQL/Drizzle world have probably seen this a bunch of times before, but I think it still holds up (now five years later) as one of the best NoSQL explanations around.

MySQL & NoSQL – Best of Both Worlds. Upcoming webinar

On Thursday 22nd May I’ll be hosting a webinar explaining how you can get the best from the NoSQL world while still getting all of the benefits of a proven RDBMS. As always the webinar is free but please register here.

There’s often a lot of excitement around NoSQL Data Stores with the promise of simple access patterns, flexible schemas, scalability and High Availability. The downside can come in the form of losing ACID transactions, consistency, flexible queries and data integrity checks. What if you could have the best of both worlds?

This webinar shows how MySQL Cluster provides simultaneous SQL and native NoSQL access to your data, with a simple key-value API (Memcached), REST, JavaScript, …

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Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 3

Background: If you did not read my first blog post about why I am sharing my thoughts on the benchmarks published by Mark Callaghan on Small Datum you may want to skim through it now for a little context:Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 1”


Last time, in Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 2 I shared my cliff notes and a graph on Mark Callaghan’s (@markcallaghan) March 11th insertion rate benchmarks using flash storage media. In those tests he compares MySQL outfitted with the …

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Eventual consistency of NoSQL marketing

Yesterday I learnt an important lesson about an important difference between NoSQL and MySQL, at least when it comes to the marketing and hype.

I saw a tweet from around marketing of one of NoSQL leaders:

Most people apparently would just conclude from the tweet's text, however I actually clicked the link, and couldn't believe eyes:

I guess that in NoSQL, when it comes to the integrity of data as well as hype - it is eventually consistent...

Use MySQL to store NoSQL and SQL data in the same database using memcached and InnoDB

MySQL is a great relational database, but at some point someone (management) in your company is probably going to say that they need to use NoSQL to store their data. After all, NoSQL is one of the latest buzzwords, so it must be good (correct?). Basically, NoSQL allows you to store data without all of the characteristics of a relational database. A very simple explanation is that you are storing all of a data set with just one primary key, and the primary key is how you also retrieve the data. While NoSQL may be good in some cases, it is hard to beat “old-fashioned” SQL relational databases – especially if that is what you know. But, with MySQL and InnoDB, you can have the best of both worlds.

With MySQL version 5.6 (and above), you have the ability to store and retrieve NoSQL data, …

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Maybe You Should Try Taking a Walk in My Shoes

The title of this post should really be, “Maybe He Should Try Taking a Walk in Your Shoes.”

The he I’m referring to is economist and author, Tim Harford. The you is the people who use NewSQL and NoSQL approaches to mine big data with database platforms like MySQL and MongoDB (or, preferably, our high-performance distributions of them, TokuDB and TokuMX).

Why should Mr. Harford take that walk? Well, he recently penned an article on big data in …

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Explaining the case for MySQL

My faithful readers, please spare 10 mins of your time, and read Baron's excellent post:

Nuff said.

Since I can't really shut up, and only if you do like my (humble) take on this, I could say in short:

Every technology/platform/framework I choose, will end up surprising me, limiting me for things can be done easily, and throw many painful challenges at me if and when I need to do things that are closer to the platform's "edges". This is true for everything including Rails, JEE, Hibernate, MongoDB, MySQL.

I've learned that the more mature, generically-capable, transparent and ecosystem-rich a solution is - the less painful surprises for me in the worst timings - and more successful I am in my job.

Thoughts on Small Datum – Part 2

If you did not read my first blog post about Mark Callaghan’s (@markcallaghan) benchmarks as documented in his blog, Small Datum, you may want to skim through it now for a little context.


On March 11th, Mark, a former Google and now Facebook database guru, published an insertion rate benchmark comparing MySQL outfitted with the InnoDB storage engine with two NoSQL alternatives — basic MongoDB and …

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