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Showing entries 1 to 13

Displaying posts with tag: RDBMS (reset)

How to structure and design a relational database to support you data storage needs?
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Well, every now and then, when we began to start a new project or app, which has some data storage requirement, we have a deep intriguing thought as to how best represent the data structure so as to support a variety of needs including but not limited to (ACID rules):

1. Normalization
2. Reliability
3. Consistency
4. And many others

Below, I provide a set of steps which you can follow to arrive at a data model that correctly suites your requirements.

Steps:

1. Identify the project or app requirements / specifications and business rules which tell you what your app will be able to do when it is ready.
2. From these business rules, identify possible objects for each business rule and mark them in a paper using rectangular sections like authors,











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On PostgreSQL. Interview with Bruce Momjian.
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“There are four things that motivate open source development teams:
1. The challenge/puzzle of programming, 2. Need for the software, 3. Personal advancement, 4. Belief in open source”
— Bruce Momjian.

On PostgreSQL and the challenges of motivating and managing open source teams, I have interviewed Bruce Momjian, Senior Database Architect at EnterpriseDB, and Co-founder of the PostgreSQL Global Development Group and Core Contributor.

RVZ

Q1. How did you manage to transform PostgreSQL from an abandoned academic project into a commercially viable, now enterprise relational database?


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Scalability Happiness – A Quiet Query Log
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Join 7500 others and follow Sean Hull on twitter @hullsean.

There’s a lot of talk on the web about scalability. Making web applications scale is not easy. The modern web architecture has so many moving parts. How can we grapple with the underlying problem?

Also: Why Are MySQL DBAs So Hard to Find?

The LAMP stack scales well

The truth that is half right. True there are a lot of moving parts, and a lot to setup. The internet stack made up of Linux, Apache, MySQL & PHP. LAMP as it’s called, was built to be resilient, dynamic, and scalable.

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Y Gatorz are Considering Moving Back to a Gator Farm Instead of MapReducing the World
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NSFW (audio) “…pipe your data to /dev/null – it will be very fast.” “Does /dev/null support sharding?” NSFW (audio) “…the only thing constructive we could have used their source files for was as random keys for SSL certs.” NSFW (audio) “PHP reeks … Continue reading →
help starting my sql ideas
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The Brief
The Client’s mystery shopping programme consists of visits to each of the client’s ten locations, grouped into five different areas. Each location receives a single visit each month, but on occasion a visit may not take place.
On the completion of each visit, a questionnaire is completed by the mystery shopper that is used to rate the service they received during the visit. The completed questionnaire is assigned a score, which is calculated based on the number of points achieved over the number of points available, normally expressed as a percentage.
Points Achieved x 100 Points Available
= % Score
PHP Development Test
The Client has requested that an end of year report is generated to summarise the data collected over the previous year. The report should be easy to understand and show as much useful information as possible.
Test






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MongoDB for MySQL folks - Part 2
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In this second part of a series of blogs on using a NoSQL database, in this case MongoDB, aimed at MySQL users, I will describe querying a bit. And it's probably not what you expected if you haven't tried a NoSQL database or MongoDB more specifically, before. The first blogpost on this subject is here.

At the heart of accessing MongoDB is JavaScript, more specifically it uses the Mozilla SpiderMonkey JavaScript engine. As I wrote in the previous blog on this subject, JavScript is all over the place in MongoB, largely you can look at MonngoDB as JavaScript with HUGE space for variables, and although many would look at this as gross oversimplification, it works

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MySQL Cluster is a brilliant NoSQL database
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MySQL Cluster* is one of the most advanced and scalable databases available today and, despite what its name might suggest, it is also a brilliant NoSQL database**.
Let me discuss this statement!
First, let’s discuss the high level issues that NoSQL databases try to address:-     Scalability. Traditional RDBMS technology was designed four decades ago, and is not appropriate for today’s Big Data requirements. Database systems today need to be able to scale horizontally over multiple machines to handle millions of users. As the CAP theorem states, it is not possible to achieve availability, scalability and consistency in one system. Several NoSQL databases sacrifice consistency for availability and scalability. -     RDBMS has a rigid data model. Once a


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Implicit COMMIT considered harmful.
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If you execute the following, what does your RDBMS do?

CREATE TABLE t1 (a int);
START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO t1 (a) VALUES (1);
START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO t1 (a) VALUES (2);
ROLLBACK;
SELECT * FROM t1;

The answer may surprise you.

Using the right tool for the job at hand - MongoDB, MySQL and Sphinx
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You may have seen my posting regarding "eventual consistency" some months ago, and you may have come to the conclusion that I was insisting that a SQL based RDBMS is the way to go for just about anything. Tell you what, that is not so. And nether am I against using. say, MongoDB, where it is appropriate.

The whole deal with Eventual consistency is something that I am still opposed to, I want to know if my data is consistent. And I am not not sure that you cannot have a fully consistent, distributed system either. But I guess that debate goes on. And I still want my base data to be consistent. Like in RDBMS-SQL-Foreign-keys-all-over-the-place-and-not-a-bl**dy-bit-lost-in-the-MyISAM-swamp consistent. That is what I want the base

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Easy MySQL: transaction isolation and ACID, the simple explanation
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Clients often ask what the differences are between the various InnoDB isolation levels, or what ACID means. Here are some simple explanations for those that have not yet read the manual and committed it to memory.

READ UNCOMMITTED
Every select operates without locks so you don’t get consistency and might have dirt reads, which are potentially earlier versions of data. So, no ACID support here.

READ COMMITTED
Has consistent reads without locks. Each consistent read, even within the same transaction, sets and reads its own fresh snapshot.

REPEATABLE READ
The InnoDB default isolation level for ACID compliance. All reads within the same transaction will be consistent between each other – ie, the C in ACID. All writes will be durable, etc etc.

SERIALIZABLE
Same as




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On SQL vs No-SQL
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The No-SQL tag really lumps together a lot of concepts that are in fact as distinct from eachother as they are from SQL/RDBMS.

An object store is not at all similar to Cassandra and Hypertable, which is not at all like an column store. And when looking at BigTable derivatives, it’s quite important to realise that Google actually does joins in middle layers or apps, so while BigTable does not have joins, the apps essentially do use them – I’ve heard it professed that denormalising everything might be a fab idea, but I don’t quite believe in that for all cases, just like I don’t believe in ditching the structured form of RDBMS being the solution.

SQL/RDBMS has had a few decades of dominance now, and has thus become the great “general purpose” tool. With the ascent of all the other tools, it’s definitely worthwhile to look at them, but also realise that

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Virtual Databases: The Face of the New Cloud Database
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Shared-disk databases can be virtualized—making them cloud-friendly—while shared-nothing databases are tied to a specific computer and a specific data set or data partition.

The underlying principle of the shared-nothing RDBMS is that a single master server owns its specific set of data. That data is not shared, hence the name shared-nothing. Because there is no ability to share the data, there is also no ability to virtualize the computing of that data. Instead the shared-nothing RDBMS ties the data and the computing to a specific computer. This association with a physical machine is then reinforced at the application level. Applications leveraging a shared-nothing database, that is partitioned across more than one server, use routing code. Routing code simply directs the various database requests to the servers that own the data being requested. In other

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Random Thought: MySQL is the Perl of RDBMS
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While chatting with a few SVN hackers at OSCON, it occured to me that MySQL is the Perl of RDBMS. Discuss among yourselves.

Showing entries 1 to 13

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