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Showing entries 1 to 29

Displaying posts with tag: packaging (reset)

MariaDB 10.0 reference card: plugins in packages
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MariaDB 10.0 comes with ~50 engines and plugins; and it comes in 35 package sets (34 binary ones and a source tarball).

Every day people come asking on #maria IRC whether a package X contains an engine Y, or saying that it doesn’t, or wondering if it should. Remembering all combinations isn’t easy, and it became impractical to study build logs or package contents every time, so I ended up with a cheat sheet for 10.0.10 GA. At the very least it should help me to answer those questions; even better if somebody else finds it useful.

The tables below refer to contents of packages provided at downloads.mariadb.org or at MariaDB repository mirrors. Packages built by distributions might have different contents and are not covered here.

Legend

— built-in (also known as static):
the plugin comes as a part of the server binary. It

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MySQL RPMS and the new yum repository
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I was really pleased to see the announcement by Oracle MySQL yum repositories that they have now produced a yum repository from where the MySQL RPMs they provide can be downloaded. This makes keeping up to date much easier. Many companies setup internal yum repositories with the software they need as then updating servers is much easier and can be done with a simple command. For many people at home that means you set this up once and don’t need to check for updates and do manual downloads, but can do a quick yum update xxxx and you get the latest version. Great!  This new yum repository only covers RHEL6 did not include RHEL5 which is not yet end of life and still used by me and probably quite a lot of other people. I filed

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On operating system upgrades and a packager’s nightmare
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A fairy tale

Once upon a time I did an operating system upgrade, a minor one that should do no harm, but just get me up to date by fixing any bugs in the version I had been using. It seemed like a good idea.

All seemed to be fine. I use a package provided by an external vendor and not the one produced by the operating system provider as this vendor provides a newer version of the package and I need that. The vendor has to make his package fit in the os environment his package is built for and normally does a pretty good job.

I use automation to build my systems and when I built a new one some issues appeared. Related to the new version of the OS the provider had enhanced one of his packages and the installation pulled in new dependencies. The install of the external package I use then broke as it conflicted with the new dependency

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Welcome Tungsten Replicator 2.1.0!
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Overview


First off, the important news. Tungsten Replicator 2.1.0 was released today.
You can download it and give it a try right now.


Second, I would say that I am quite surprised at how much we have done in this release. The previous release (2.0.7) was in February, which is just a few months ago, and yet it looks like ages when I see the list of improvements, new features and bug fixes in the Release Notes. I did not realized it until I ran my last batch of checks to test the upgrade from the previous release, which I hadn’t run for quite a long





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Packages to get MariaDB and tests up and running
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yum

It’s often pain to guess package names when you need to install stuff on, lets say, CentOS. So there is a list, although maybe not full, of what I needed to get another VM build and run MariaDB server and to execute at least some tests on it (all done via yum install):

cmake
gcc
ncurses-devel
bison
g++
gcc-c++
aclocal
automake
libtool
perl-DBD-MySQL
gdb
libaio-devel
openssl-devel

Same in one line, for lazy me:
sudo yum install cmake gcc ncurses-devel bison g++ gcc-c++ aclocal automake libtool perl-DBD-MySQL gdb libaio-devel openssl-devel

To install bzr:

su -c ‘rpm -Uvh http://download.fedora.redhat.com/pub/epel/5/i386/epel-release-5-2.noarch.rpm’
(check the architecture)

and then can use yum















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MySQL and Packaging
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The MySQL Server from Oracle comes in a two different flavours: Community Edition and Enterprise Edition. The first one is under the GPLv2 license and the later is under the GPLv2 or Commercial license.

The Enterprise Edition was always available from https://enterprise.mysql.com (which now has an expired SSL certificate) under the GPLv2 license. This download page was restricted to paying customers. Since the Enterprise downloads were moved to https://edelivery.oracle.com the downloads are available for everyone (as long as it's not restricted by export regulations and accept the trial license agreement). The license is now 'Commercial'. The download be named V24071-01.zip or something like that, which is annoying. The latest version for the Enterprise release on edelivery is 5.5.8 while the latest Community version is 5.5.11.

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libdrizzle in Visual Studio
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Thanks to Jobin's work with mingw and getting libdrizzle to compile on Windows at all, I have been able to get it working in Visual Studio natively. The code is in trunk now.

The approach I took, which is how I'm going to approach Windows and Visual Studio for all of our stuff, is to not worry with analogues to things like configure on Windows. Windows is a very different platform from Linux, and there is no need to attempt to duplicate Linux process there. To that end, the goal at least for now will be static VS Solution files and a set of instructions of how to get depends installed so that the Solution can find them. 

I'm excited to start poking at Garrett Serack's CoApp Project, which has some tools do do tracing of things like make to help with the

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How to get your product bundled with Linux distributions
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I recently received a question from Robin Schumacher at Calpont, the makers of the InfiniDB analytics database engine for MySQL: "How would you recommend we try and get bundled in with the various Linux distros?"

Since this question has come up several times before, I thought it might make sense to blog about my take on this.

First of all, please note that there is a difference between "being part of the core distribution" and "being available from a distributor's package repository". The latter one is relatively easy, the former can be hard, as you need to convince the distributor that your application is worth devoting engineering resources to maintain and support your application as part of their product. It's also a space

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Building MySQL Server with CMake on Linux/Unix
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CMake is a cross-platform, open-source build system, maintained by Kitware, Inc.

From the CMake.org home page:

CMake is a family of tools designed to build, test and package software. CMake is used to control the software compilation process using simple platform and compiler independent configuration files. CMake generates native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in the compiler environment of your choice.

It has been used for building the MySQL Server on Windows since MySQL 5.0 – the initial CMake build support was added in August 2006.

For

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Linux MySQL distros meeting in Brussels
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When I saw Shlomi's post on why not to use apt-get or yum for MySQL, I thought immediately that his conclusions are quite reasonable. What you get from the Linux distributions is not the same thing that you find in the official MySQL downloads page. Now, whether you value more the completeness of the server or the ease of administration through the distribution installation tools, it's up to you and your business goals. We at the MySQL team have organized a meeting with the Linux distributions with the intent of finding out which differences and problems we may have with each other, and to solve them by improving communication. What follows is a summary of what happened in Brussels during the meeting.



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Some friendly advice for bootstrapping your OSS project
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So you're a small startup company, ready to go live with your product, which you intend to distribute under an Open Source License. Congratulations, you made a wise decision! Your developers have been hacking away frantically, getting the code in good shape for the initial launch. Now it's time to look into what else needs to be built and setup, so you're ready to welcome the first members of your new community and to ensure they are coming back!

Keep the following saying in mind, which especially holds true in the Open Source world: "You never get a second chance to make a first impression!". While the most important thing is of course to have a compelling and useful product, this blog post is an attempt to highlight some other aspects about community building and providing

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Embedded InnoDB 1.0.3.5325 RPM packages
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Shortly after I created the initial packages of embedded InnoDB on the OpenSUSE Build Service, Oracle/Innobase released an updated version (1.0.3.5325). In addition to many improvements and bug fixes, they slightly changed the versioning scheme to better indicate what version of the InnodDB plugin their code is based on (see Vasil's posting on the InnoDB Forums for more information).

I've now updated my InnoDB packages on the Build Service to this version as well - please note that the naming scheme of the shared library

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Embedded InnoDB now available on the openSUSE Build Service
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Oracle/InnoBase announced the availability of the embedded version of InnoDB at this year's MySQL Conference & Expo, but I have not seen a lot of comments or reviews about it so far. Which surprises me, because I think this is a very interesting piece of technology!

In my opinion it might actually hit the sweet spot for application developers seeking an alternative embedded database solution. SQLite is nice and popular, but it seems to have concurrency issues when used in multi-threaded applications. An embedded

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xtrabackup 0.7 RPMs available on the openSUSE Build Service
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XtraBackup is an Open Source online (non-blockable) backup solution for the InnoDB and XtraDB storage engines. It works with both MySQL 5.0 and 5.1 (and possibly 5.4 as well) and is distributed under the GPLv2.

Some weeks ago Vadim announced the availability of xtrabackup-0.7, stating that they consider it stable enough now to label this version a "Release Candidate". I've been maintaining RPM packages of xtrabackup on the fine openSUSE Build Service for quite some time now, RPMs of 0.7 for a number of distributions are now

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Drizzle Developer Day in Santa Clara
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Today I attended the Drizzle Developer Day which took place in the auditorium of the Sun Campus in Santa Clara.

Many of the the Drizzle core hackers as well as several other people interested in the development attended this event, hacking away and discussing various issues. Jeremy Zawodny gave a presentation about Craigslist's needs for Drizzle, Jay Pipes gave an overview over Google's protocol buffers library. I took a number of pictures, which you can find in my Flickr

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Fix for Debian/InnoDB Problem
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Baron was just writing about problems with the Debian init scripts. The basic problem boils down to /etc/mysql/debian-start running mysqlcheck on every table.

Kolbe Kolbe and Harrison Fisk pointed this  out to me last February, and as a result I re-wrote the debian-start.inc script to only operate on MyISAM tables. Additionally, the default config was changed to turn on the myisam-recover option, so even for the MyISAM tables, all we do is touch the table to get MySQL to recover it if needed. (Which I promise you, you really want if you're modifying MyISAM tables on a production server. Don't do that, really, but that's another issue.) The new process essentiall looks like this:

for table in `select TABLE_NAME from information_schema.TABLES where ENGINE='MyISAM'":
  select
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Fix for Debian/InnoDB Problem
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Baron was just writing about problems with the Debian init scripts. The basic problem boils down to /etc/mysql/debian-start running mysqlcheck on every table.

Kolbe Kolbe and Harrison Fisk pointed this  out to me last February, and as a result I re-wrote the debian-start.inc script to only operate on MyISAM tables. Additionally, the default config was changed to turn on the myisam-recover option, so even for the MyISAM tables, all we do is touch the table to get MySQL to recover it if needed. (Which I promise you, you really want if you're modifying MyISAM tables on a production server. Don't do that, really, but that's another issue.) The new process essentiall looks like this:

for table in `select TABLE_NAME from information_schema.TABLES where ENGINE='MyISAM'":
  select
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Recent additions to my openSUSE Build Service repository
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I recently added two new packages to my repository on the openSUSE Build Service:

  • Maatkit is a collection of essential command-line utilities for MySQL. Each is completely stand-alone, without dependencies other than core Perl and the DBI drivers needed to connect to MySQL, and doesn't need to be "installed" - you can just execute the scripts. This makes the tools easy to use on systems where you can't install anything extra, such as customer sites or ISPs.
  • protobuf - Protocol Buffers - Google's data interchange format. Protocol Buffers are a way of encoding structured data in an efficient yet extensible format. Google
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Anyone want to help build RPMs of Maatkit?
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Dear LazyWeb, I want to use my Ubuntu laptop (on amd64 BTW) to build an RPM of Maatkit that will work on all RPM-based distros. Is it possible? Or are there enough differences between the RPM-based distros that I can’t do it? Mind you, the finished RPM ought to just have some man pages and Perl scripts, so I don’t think it will be platform- or distro-specific. But I am just not an expert on it.

The second question is, what do I need to put into my Makefile to do this? My ‘make all’ currently builds a .zip, a .tar.gz, and a .deb package — what needs to change to make that include .rpm?

Someone who is willing to help create .spec files, etc, etc will be immediately given commit rights to Maatkit’s SVN repository!

Debian, packaging, RPM
Thoughts about OSS project hosting and the importance of controlling downloads
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In a recent article, Matt Asay was musing about the aspects of hosting an Open Source project by yourself vs. using a public project hosting service like SourceForge, GitHub or Launchpad. He concluded that it's important for commercial/sponsored open source projects in particular to do the hosting by themselves, so they can maintain full control and can gain more insight, which hopefully will turn into more revenue at some point.

However, Matt seems to reduce "hosting" to "providing downloads" only:

Control and visibility. Given the importance of customer conversions, it becomes hugely valuable information to know that it takes,
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OpenSolaris EPIC FAIL
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I decided I’d be a good sport and try to do some build work for Drizzle on OpenSolaris to make sure we weren’t accidentally Linux-ifying something. Nevermind OpenSolaris installing an nsswitch file set up to not use DNS by default. Nevermind OpenSolaris reinventing the wheel for package management rather than starting with a package management system already in use by people (or and then fixing the things . Nevermind the GPL incompatible CDDL license… I’d be a good sport and give it (another) try.

I should add, in all honesty, I really do want OpenSolaris to be good. I think monocultures are bad, and I think Solaris can be useful in the growth of the ecosystem.

Step one. Install bzr.

pkg search bzr

Nothing. Wasn’t expecting much. That’s ok. Grab tarball. Unpack.

FAIL

Silly me. There is no


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mylvmbackup 0.8 has been released
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I am happy to announce the release of mylvmbackup version 0.8. mylvmbackup is a tool for quickly creating backups of a MySQL server's data files. To perform a backup, mylvmbackup obtains a read lock on all tables and flushes all server caches to disk, makes an LVM snapshot of the volume containing the MySQL data directory, and unlocks the tables again. The snapshot process takes only a small amount of time. When it is done, the server can continue normal operations, while the actual file backup proceeds.

Below is the list of changes since version 0.6. You may wonder what happened to version 0.7 - it had a rather short life cycle as I was informed about a bug that I fixed quickly before I made a wider release announcement of 0.7.

  • Fixed a bug in the InnoDB
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A good build system is hard to find
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I was just reading Jan’s post about how to write a good build system

I’m in the need for a portable, fast build-system.

While I’m not about to write a build system in lua - or anything else, I thought I’d pitch in my thoughts as I’ve been having a similar problem recently. The problem is, autotools is the only system that doesn’t require some prereq to be installed on the system … other than a working build system. The only real downside to autotools (other than needing to learn m4) is that it is useless on Windows.

As Jan says, though, the other systems fall down on the make dist part. This is way important to me, as I also work in my tree alot and I really want to have an automated step to make sure




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MySQL 5.0.45 for OS/2 Warp and eComStation
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For those of you who enjoy running exotic operating systems: I just stumbled over a port of MySQL 5.0.45 for OS/2 and eComStation. Thanks a lot to Paul Smedley for maintaining this version! He also maintains a large number of other Unix applications that he ported over to OS/2 - very impressive.

Binary builds of MySQL Proxy available via the openSUSE build service
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In addition to the binary downloads that we provide from our site, Linux RPM builds of the MySQL Proxy (both the latest stable version as well as SVN snapshot releases, named mysql-proxy-snapshot) are now available for download from the server:/database repository of the openSUSE build service. It provides packages for a number of Linux distributions, e.g. Fedora 5/6, SLES 9/10 SuSE/openSUSE 10.x. By the way, this repository also contains RPMs of the current 5.0.45 MySQL Community Server for the distributions mentioned above. Thanks a lot to Darix for the initial checkin of the proxy package!

 

mysql-proxy on ubuntu (and debian)
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il corra walks you through building mysql-proxy for ubuntu.

il corra » mysql-proxy on ubuntu 7.04 feisty

First of all, there is not a packetized mysql-proxy for Ubuntu, so the only way to install it is to build it from the source

Which is great. But I'd like to take this opportunity to tell people that I've actually been working on packages for debian/ubuntu. They're almost ready to be released into the wild (I'm waiting on an almost non-related event) If you'd like to play with the packaging stuff before then, check out http://launchpad.net/mysql-proxy

I'll be sure to let everyone know when the packages themselves are in an APT repository.

Why I hate YUM
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I really hate YUM, the crappy-ass apt wanna-be that all the non-Debian distros wet themselves over. Yes, it's better than what they had before, which was NOTHING. But it is absolutely inexcusable that, when apt was already available, powerful and quick, that they wrote YUM. Not because I think everyone has to use my favorite toy, but because it's a worse tool. It's it's slower, it's stupid and it gives terrible feedback.

Let's start with today's beef. I tried to do this:

yum install libselinux-devel

on a just-installed Fedora 7. What I got was this:

Transaction Check Error:
file /usr/share/man/man8/matchpathcon.8.gz from install of libselinux-2.0.14-4.fc7
conflicts with file from package libselinux-2.0.13-1.fc7
file /usr/share/man/man8/selinux.8.gz from install of libselinux-2.0.14-4.fc7
conflicts with file from package
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Packaging and Installing the MySQL Proxy with RPM
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As I felt the itch to do some quick hacking yesterday, I decided to provide an RPM spec file for the MySQL proxy. The changes have been commited to the SVN trunk now and I added some hints to the INSTALL file on how to perform an RPM build.

Here is a quick summary of how to convert the current SVN code into an installable RPM. You build environment needs to fulfill a few additional prerequisites (a gcc compiler and the C library header files are taken for granted here), I added the versions I used on my openSUSE 10.2 system for reference:

  • autoconf 2.56 or newer (autoconf-2.60)
  • automake 1.9 or newer
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To start or not start the MySQL server during the RPM installation?
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So far, the MySQL Server RPM packages as provided by MySQL AB used to automatically start the mysqld process after the package has been installed. It has been like that since the very beginning and we think of it as a convenience for our users when they want to get up and running quickly.

However, Kristian raised an interesting point in BUG#27072 where he points out that automatically starting mysqld during the RPM installation might not always be the desired behaviour, especially in automatic installation environments or during a fresh installation (where the system might not be fully configured yet). Therefore he proposes to change this behaviour to not start mysqld as part of the installation.

While I personally agree with his proposal,

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Showing entries 1 to 29

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