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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 306 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: NoSQL (reset)

Developing with MySQL and NoSQL
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MySQL adopts a very different approach to 'NoSQL' than other databases. With the memcached plugin, MySQL provides the speed and high availability benefits of a standard 'NoSQL' database solution, while mitigating many of the drawbacks to this approach.

A traditional memcached application bypasses the SQL layer entirely, and stores all its data in memory. This makes data access extremely fast, but there is a risk that the data will disappear in the event of a system problem. 

The MySQL memcached plugin for InnoDB also bypasses the SQL and optimization layers, resulting in excellent performance. It goes further, writing key-value data directly to  InnoDB tables. The result is fast data access while retaining the advantages provided by the existing relational database infrastructure, such as the ability to run complex queries with SQL, maintain data

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Reflections on return to MySQL Community and Ecosystem
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After a four year hiatus, my participation in last week’s Percona Live MySQL Users conference marked my official return to the MySQL Community and Ecosystem. As with earlier renditions this year’s “UC” was very well attended with a healthy mix of familiar faces and new blood, all coming together to discuss, present and explore the boundaries of the most popular and widely used open source database on the planet.  There were many good, informative keynote and technical sessions, BoFs and the exhibit hall was packed most of the operating hours with those interested in what the MySQL ecosystem is up to.  I also found it very refreshing that Oracle was among the most active in presenting useful technical content around their current and future MySQL open source product releases. All in  [Read more...]
Reports exaggerated
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I've been letting the blog rest recently, and not so recently as well.  The problem is not a lack of subjects, but a lack of time to do them any justice.  However it is quite sad to see that my last entry was in September 2012, so it is time to post again.

Of late I have been pondering what I have to say about :
  • Distributed MVCC and write-scaling
  • Different approaches to eventual consistency with replicated RDBMS
  • Various MySQL Cluster related topics
  • Various general rambling and unstructured topics
However, these will take some time to percolate and calcify.

In the meantime here are some things I have found interesting recently :






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Big Data: Three questions to Aerospike.
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“Many tools now exist to run database software without installing software. From vagrant boxes, to one click cloud install, to a cloud service that doesn’t require any installation, developer ease of use has always been a path to storage platform success.”–Brian Bulkowski.

The fifth interview in the “Big Data: three questions to “ series of interviews, is with Brian Bulkowski, Aerospike co-founder and CTO.

RVZ

Q1. What is your current product offering?

Brian Bulkowski: Aerospike is the first in-memory NoSQL database optimized for flash or solid state drives (SSDs).
In-memory for speed and NoSQL for scale. Our

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Why I Love Open Source
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Anders Karlsson wrote about Some myths on Open Source, the way I see it a few days ago.  Anders' article is mostly focused on exploding the idea that open source magically creates high quality code.  It is sad to say you do not have to look very far to see how true this is.

While I largely agree with Anders' points, there is far more that could be said on this subject, especially on the benefits of open source. I love working on open source software. Here are three reasons that are especially important to me.

1.) Open source is a great way to disseminate technology to users.  In the best cases, it is this easy to get open source products up and running:

$ sudo apt-get install software-i-want-to-use

A lot







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Are SQL Databases Dead?
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I like the image of this city of Mesa Verde. It’s fascinating to see how ancient cities were built, especially as an inhabitant of one of the worlds largest cities today, New York. I’m a long time relational database guy. I worked at scores of dot-coms in the 90′s as an old-guard Oracle DBA, and […]
The USA's healthcare.gov site and LAMP
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The USA's health care exchange site, healthcare.gov, has had well-publicized initial woes.

The New York Times has said one of the problems was the government's choice of DBMS, namely MarkLogic. A MarkLogic employee has said that "If the exact same processes and analysis were applied to a LAMP stack or an Oracle Exa-stack, the results would have likely been the same."

I don't know why he picked Exastack for comparison, but I too have wondered whether things would have been different if the American government had chosen a LAMP component (MySQL or MariaDB) as a DBMS, instead of MarkLogic.

What is MarkLogic?

The company is a software firm founded in 2001 based in San Carlos California. It has

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MySQL 5.7 : Over 1M QPS with InnoDB Memcached Plugin
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Or I could place in the title – “Yes, we done it!”

After reaching 500K QPS in Read-Only on SQL queries, it was natural to expect a much higher performance level from InnoDB Memcached Plugin which is by-passing all SQL related layers.. However the story is not simple, and yet far from finished

While for today we have already our first “preview” results showing that we’re able to reach over 1,000,000 Query/sec level with the latest MySQL 5.7 code:

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Log Buffer #346, A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs
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Economist says that Physics suggest that storms will get worse as the planet warms. Typhoon Haiyan in Philippines, bush-fires in Australia, floods in China, and extreme unpredictable weather across the planet is a sober reminder. Good news is that technology and awareness is rising, and so is the data. Database technologies are playing their part to intelligently store that data and enabling the stakeholders to analyze and get meaningful results to predict and counter the extreme conditions. This Log Buffer Edition appreciates these efforts.

Big Data:

Big Data Tools that You Need to Know About – Hadoop & NoSQL.

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Big Data Tools that You Need to Know About – Hadoop & NoSQL – Part 2
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In the previous article we introduced Hadoop as the most popular Big Data toolset on the market today. We had just started talking about MapReduce as the major framework that makes Hadoop distinctive. So let’s continue the discussion where we left off.

 

MapReduce is really the key to understanding Hadoop’s parallel processing functionality as it enables data in various formats (XML, text, binary, log, SQL, ect) to be divided up and mapped out to many computers nodes and then recombined back to produce a final data set.

 

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Mixing databases usually not optimal
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Dan McKinley (Etsy) wrote an [IMHO] insightful article Why MongoDB Never Worked at Etsy.

First off, it’s important to realise that it’s not a snipe at MongoDB – it’s a fine tool.

The lessons are related to mixing multiple databases in a deployment (administration and monitoring overhead) and the acknowledgement that issues of schema design, scalability and maintenance need attention regardless of which brand or technology you pick for your database. That comes back to the old insight that migrations are rarely worth it (regardless of what you migrate to what).

I think these are indeed important considerations as they have a major impact on the ongoing costs of your entire environment (production as well as development and testing) – these days we

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The Third Most Popular Open Source DBMS
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We all know that MySQL says it is "the world's most popular open-source database" (http://www.mysql.com). And PostgreSQL has a firm hold on second place while claiming to be, instead, "the world's most advanced open source database". But the horse that comes in third can return some money to gamblers who bet "to show". And the horse that shows momentum or gets close is worth watching for next time.

So I'll just ignore the dolphin and the elephant in the room, and go on to a harder question: who's number three?

According to Wikipedia

To find out how many times someone has expressed interest in a topic, I can go to stats.grok.se and ask how many times someone has looked at that topic's page in Wikipedia. Evil-thinking people could manipulate these numbers with ease, but until

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Data Analytics at NBCUniversal. Interview with Matthew Eric Bassett.
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“The most valuable thing I’ve learned in this role is that judicious use of a little bit of knowledge can go a long way. I’ve seen colleagues and other companies get caught up in the “Big Data” craze by spend hundreds of thousands of pounds sterling on a Hadoop cluster that sees a few megabytes [...]
Lock Diagnostics and Index Usage Statistics in TokuMX v1.2.1
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TokuMX v1.2.1 introduces two simple new features to help you understand the performance characteristics of your database: lock diagnostics and index usage statistics. We’d like to take you through a few examples of what these features are and how to use them.

Lock Diagnostics

Since we introduced TokuMX, one of the most frequent complaints has been about “lock not granted” errors.  These arise when a long-running operation takes document-level locks, and other clients timeout while waiting to acquire the same locks.

This is a new problem in TokuMX that doesn’t exist in MongoDB, because MongoDB

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Webinar Replay + Q&A – Developing JavaScript Applications for Node.js with MySQL and NoSQL
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On Thursday 12th September I co-presented a webinar on how MySQL Cluster delivers the key benefits of NoSQL Data Stores without having to give up the features that people rely on from relational databases (consistency, SQL etc.). There was a particular focus on how to use the new node.js JavaScript API which was recently released as part of MySQL Cluster 7.3. If you weren’t able to attend the live event then the webinar replay is available here (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/on-demand-webinars/#en-20-28"

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Webinar – Developing JavaScript Applications for Node.js with MySQL and NoSQL
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Note that the webinar replay + transcript of the Questions and Answers is now available from here.

On Thursday 12th September I’ll be co-presenting a free webinar on how MySQL Cluster delivers the key benefits of NoSQL Data Stores without having to give up the features that people rely on from relational databases (consistency, SQL etc.). There will be particular

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Big Data from Space: the “Herschel” telescope.
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” One of the biggest challenges with any project of such a long duration is coping with change. There are many aspects to coping with change, including changes in requirements, changes in technology, vendor stability, changes in staffing and so on”–Jon Brumfitt. On May 14, 2009, the European Space Agency launched an Arianne 5 rocket [...]
Schema Design in MongoDB vs Schema Design in MySQL
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For people used to relational databases, using NoSQL solutions such as MongoDB brings interesting challenges. One of them is schema design: while in the relational world, normalization is a good way to start, how should we design our collections when creating a new MongoDB application?

Let’s see with a simple example how we would create a data structure for MySQL (or any relational database) and for MongoDB. We will assume in this post that we want to store people information (their name) and the details from their passport (country and validity date).

Relational Design

In the relational world, the basic idea is to try to stick to the 3rd normal form and create two tables (I’ll omit indexes and foreign keys for clarity – MongoDB supports indexes but not foreign keys):

mysql> select * from people;
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On Oracle NoSQL Database –Interview with Dave Segleau.
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“We went down the path of building Oracle NoSQL database because of explicit request from some of our largest Oracle Berkeley DB installations that wanted to move away from maintaining home grown sharding implementations and very much wanted an out of box technology that can replicate the robustness of what they had built “out of [...]
Using JavaScript and Node.js with MySQL Cluster – First steps
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We’re very pleased to announce that MySQL Cluster 7.3 has gone GA; for a full run-down of the new features and enhancements, take a look at the "MySQL Cluster 7.3 New Features for Internet-Scale Performance with Carrier-Grade Availability" white paper (http://www.mysql.com/why-mysql/white-papers/mysql-cluster-7-2-new-features-whitepaper/) but this post will focus on just one of the features – the MySQL Cluster JavaScript Driver for Node.js. The post will step you through setting everything up so that you can get your first Node.js code reading and writing from MySQL Cluster.

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On PostgreSQL. Interview with Tom Kincaid.
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“Application designers need to start by thinking about what level of data integrity they need, rather than what they want, and then design their technology stack around that reality. Everyone would like a database that guarantees perfect availability, perfect consistency, instantaneous response times, and infinite throughput, but it´s not possible to create a product with [...]
Exploring SAP HANA – Powering Next Generation Analytics
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SAP HANA , having entered the data 2.0/3.0 space at the right time, has been getting traction lately; and there will be lot of users like me who wants to[...]
From Oracle to 10gen, The MongoDB Company
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Those who are familiar with me know I've a dream.

5 years ago I decided to leave a systems integrator where I was doing great. Why? I wanted to be in a company with the same growth prospects that Oracle had in the 80s. I dreamed to be in the Oracle of 30 years ago and, as time travel wasn't affordable, I decided to join MySQL AB to help expand the business in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.
A few years later my dream came true, but in a slightly different sense. Sun acquired MySQL and was later swallowed by


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Slides from Failover or not Failover, that is the question
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Below are the slides from my last talk at this Percona Live Worldwide MySQL Conference. The idea for this talk was proposed by my co-presenter Massimo Brignoli and goes back to a debate on this topic that went through the MySQL blogosphere during last Autumn - which in itself was sparked by an outstanding retrospective published about a MySQL failure at Github.

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Percona Live - Keynote: How MySQL can thrive in the world of massive data hype
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  Continuent CEO Robert Hodges says that NoSQL solutions are oversold, but this is no reason for MySQL fans to become complacent. He kicked off Day 2 of the Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo with his keynote, "How MySQL can thrive in the world of massive data hype."He said there are new challenges in data management, and relational databases must solve them or risk becoming irrelevant. This
MySQL Cluster Tutorial: NoSQL JavaScript Connector for Node.js
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This tutorial has been authored by Craig Russell and JD Duncan

The MySQL Cluster team are working on a new NoSQL JavaScript connector for MySQL. The objectives are simplicity and high performance for JavaScript users:

- allows end-to-end JavaScript development, from the browser to the server and now to the world's most popular open source database

- native "NoSQL" access to the storage layer without going first through SQL transformations and parsing.

Node.js is a complete web platform built around JavaScript designed to deliver millions of client connections on commodity hardware. With the MySQL NoSQL Connector for JavaScript, Node.js users can easily add data access and persistence to their web, cloud, social and

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MongoDB Multi-Statement Transactions? Yes We Can!
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Earlier, I talked about the transactional semantics we are introducing to MongoDB. As I hinted at the end of the post, we are actually doing more. We are introducing multi-statement transactions. That’s right, multiple queries, updates, deletes, and inserts will be able to run inside of a single transaction. We are working on the details of the semantics as we develop our beta, but at a high level, think of it as having the same semantics as TokuDB and InnoDB’s multi-statement transactions in MySQL.

So how will it work? We introduce three new commands:

db.runCommand({"beginTransaction", "isolation": "mvcc"})

This begins a transaction with the isolation level of MVCC, which means queries will use a snapshot of the system.

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MongoDB Transactions? Yes
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People claim that MongoDB is not transactional. It actually is, and that’s a good thing.

In MongoDB 2.2, individual operations are Atomic. By having per database locks control reads and writes to collections, write operations on collections are Consistent and Isolated. With journaling on, operations may be made Durable. Put these properties together, and you have basic ACID properties for transactions.

The shortcoming with MongoDB’s implementation is that these semantics apply to individual write operations, such as an individual insert or individual update. If a MongoDB statement updates 10 rows, and something goes wrong with the fifth row, then the statement

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See You at Percona Live 2013!
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Percona Live 2013 is coming up fast.  This is hands-down the best MySQL conference of the year, attended by a lot of people I really respect.  Check the speaker list if you need some of their names.  I will also be doing two talks myself.
  • 9am Wednesday 24 April - Keynote:  How MySQL Can Thrive in the World of Massive Data Hype.  NoSQL solutions are oversold, but this is no reason for complacency in the MySQL community.  There are new challenges in data management, and we need to solve them or become irrelevant.   I will show some of the advances Continuent

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They say: "Relational Databases Aren't Dead"
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This is a good read, claiming: "Relational Databases Aren't Dead. Heck, They're Not Even Sleeping", http://readwrite.com/2013/03/26/relational-databases-far-from-dead. A key quote:
"While not comprehensive, the uses for NoSQL databases center around the acquisition of fast-growing data or data that does not easily fit within uniform structures."

There were 2 parts in the statement about NoSQL's uses. I'll start with the latter:


"data that does not easily fit within uniform structures" - NoSQL is probably the right choice, hmm although I always encourage thinking and architecting in advance. And also online structure changes do exist in the RDBMS world and recently in MySQL:




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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 306 Next 30 Older Entries

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