Showing entries 1 to 10 of 80
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: explain (reset)
Fun with Bugs #59 - On MySQL Bug Reports I am Subscribed to, Part II

New Year (that starts on Monday!) gives a good opportunity to change something in our lives, start doing something new, better or different. Let's assume I failed with all these so far, as I am again posting about MySQL bugs here.

Since my previous post on this topic I've subscribed to 15 more MySQL bugs, and being on a combination of public holidays and vacation now gives me a good opportunity to review these bug reports.

Here they are, starting from the most recent:

  • Bug #89065 - "sync_binlog=1 on a busy server and slow binary log filesystem stalls slaves". I do not remember seeing multiple threads in "Finished reading one binlog; switching to next binlog" state, but it would be …
[Read more]
This Week in Data with Colin Charles 18: Percona Live Call For Papers and a MongoDB 3.6 Overview

Join Percona Chief Evangelist Colin Charles as he covers happenings, gives pointers and provides musings on the open source database community.

I highly recommend submitting to the CFP for Percona Live Santa Clara 2018 even though it only closes December 22 2017. By the 3rd week of December, i.e. before the CfP closes, it is very likely that we will announce some of the schedule. So get in early! Keep in mind the broad topics, there are some ideas here.

Also: we are looking for sponsors for Percona Live – you can email me for more information.

Releases

[Read more]
Webinar Thursday, October 19, 2017: What You Need to Get the Most Out of Indexes – Part 2

Join Percona’s Senior Architect, Matthew Boehm, as he presents What You Need to Get the Most Out of Indexes – Part 2 webinar on Thursday, October 19, 2017, at 11:00 am PDT / 2:00 pm EDT (UTC-7).

Register Now

Proper indexing is key to database performance. Finely tune your query writing and database performance with tips from the experts. MySQL offers a few different types of indexes and uses them in a variety of ways.

In this session you’ll learn:

  • How to use composite indexes
  • Other index usages besides lookup
  • How to find …
[Read more]
Introduction to Troubleshooting Performance – Troubleshooting Slow Queries webinar: Q & A

In this blog, I will provide answers to the Q & A for the Troubleshooting Slow Queries webinar.

First, I want to thank you for attending the April 28 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that I wasn’t able to answer during the webinar, with responses:

Q: I’ve heard that is a bad idea to use

select *

; what do you recommend?

A: When I used

SELECT *

 in my slides, I wanted to underline the idea that sometimes you need to select all columns …

[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON wrap-up

This blog is an EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON wrap-up for the series of posts I’ve done in the last few months.

In this series, we’ve discussed everything unique to

EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON

. I intentionally skipped a description of members such as

table_name

,

access_type

  or

select_id

, which are not unique.

In this series, I only mentioned in passing members that replace information from the

Extra

 column in the regular

EXPLAIN

 output, such as

using_join_buffer

 ,

partitions

,

using_temporary_table

  or …

[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON: nested_loop makes JOIN hierarchy transparent

Once again it’s time for another EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON is cool! post. This post will discuss how EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON allows the nested_loop command to make the JOIN operation hierarchy transparent.

The regular

EXPLAIN

  command lists each table that participates in a 

JOIN

  operation on a single row. This works perfectly for simple queries:

mysql> explain select * from employees join titles join salariesG
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: employees
   partitions: NULL
         type: ALL
possible_keys: NULL
          key: NULL …
[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON: cost_info knows why optimizer prefers one index to another

Time for another entry in the EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON is cool! series of blog posts. This time we’ll discuss how using EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON allows you to see that

cost_info

  knows why the optimizer prefers one index to another.

Tables often have more than one index. Any of these indexes can be used to resolve query. The optimizer has to make a choice in this case. One of the metrics that can be used to help make the choice is the potential cost of the query evaluation.

For example, let’s take the table

titles

  from the standard employees database:

[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON: buffer_result is not hidden!

Time for another entry in the EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON is cool! series. Today we’re going to look at how you can view the buffer result using JSON (instead of the regular

EXPLAIN

 command.

Regular

EXPLAIN

 does not identify if

SQL_BUFFER_RESULT

 was used at all. To demonstrate, let’s run this query:

mysql> explain select * from salariesG
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: salaries
   partitions: NULL
         type: ALL
possible_keys: NULL
          key: NULL
      key_len: NULL
          ref: NULL
         rows: 2557022
     filtered: 100.00 …
[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON knows everything about UNIONs: union_result and query_specifications

Ready for another post in the EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON is Cool series! Great! This post will discuss how to see all the information that is contained in optimized queries with

UNION

 using the

union_result

 and

query_specifications

 commands.

 

When optimizing complicated queries with

UNION

, it is easy to get lost in the regular

EXPLAIN

  output trying to identify which part of the output belongs to each part of the

UNION

.

Let’s consider the following example:

mysql> explain
    ->     select emp_no, last_name, 'low_salary' from employees
    ->     where emp_no in (select emp_no from salaries
    ->         where salary < …
[Read more]
EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON has details for subqueries in HAVING, nested selects and subqueries that update values

Over several previous blog posts, we’ve already discussed what information the 

EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON

 output provides for some subqueries. You can review those discussions here, here and here. EXPLAIN FORMAT=JSON shows many details that you can’t get with other commands. Let’s now finish this topic and discuss the output for the rest of the subquery types.

[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 80
10 Older Entries »