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Displaying posts with tag: configuration (reset)
Scaling Wordpress and MySQL on Multiple Servers for Performance

June 11, 2013 By Severalnines

Over the years, WordPress has evolved from a simple blogging platform to a CMS. Over seven million sites use it today, including the likes of CNN, Forbes, The New York Times and eBay. So, how do you scale Wordpress on multiple servers for high performance? 

 

This post is similar to our previous post on Drupal, Scaling Drupal on Multiple Servers with Galera Cluster for MySQL but we will focus on Wordpress, Percona XtraDB Cluster and GlusterFS using Debian Squeeze 64bit.

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MySQL updates, openSUSE 13.1 and default configuration

Recently I had some time to do some clenaups/changes/updates in server:database repo regarding MySQL (and MariaDB). Nothing too big. Well actually, there are few little things that I want to talk about and that is the reason for this blog post, but still, nothing really important…

MySQL 5.5, 5.6 and 5.7

MySQL 5.6 is stable for some time already, so it’s time to put it in the action. So I sent the request to include it in Factory and therefore in openSUSE 13.1. There is off course a list of interesting stuff you might want to take a look at before you update. If you don’t want to update, you can install mysql-community-server_55 from …

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MySQL binlogs - Don't forget to do your homework!

Now that I'm back doing just database stuff, I've come to realize I've gotten a little sloppy about doing my homework.  Homework's never been my favorite thing in the world, but it often reduces stress when your under the gun during an outage or upgrade...

We had a MySQL database server that's been slow on DML changes, and based on the slowest statements being 'COMMIT', we had a good mind

On configuring the Performance Schema

On configuring the Performance Schema

This article is a user guide about MySQL 5.6 Performance Schema configuration. As with many things, the way to approach problems may vary a lot based on systems, user experiences, or just plain opinions, so the "Your Mileage May Vary" caution applies here.

It is easy to get lost in details, and yet starting with the big picture in mind helps to understand not only how, but also more importantly why, to do things ...

The magic recipe is as follows

  • Define your goals
  • Define what to instrument
  • Define how much detail to collect
  • Provide sizing data
  • Monitor sizing problems


Define your goals
Performance instrumentation in general can be used for many different things, ranging from casual monitoring in production to debugging in development, with every flavor in …

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Do we need a MySQL Cookbook?

The blog title says it all: Do we need a MySQL Cookbook? I tend to think so.

This seems to be something that is missing with current MySQL documentation. There is lots of information available but finding the appropriate bit can be quite tedious and it often requires looking in multiple places.

A lot of other software has such books, but for some reason MySQL seems to be missing one.

A recent example comes from a “documentation feature request” I posted today: http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=68171. MySQL 5.6 provides a way to “move InnoDB tables” from one server to another. There are many reasons why you may want to do it, but the documentation is currently rather sparse. A simple “example recipe” for this would be good, as would an equivalent recipe for other engines where you can do this such as MyISAM. This is just an isolated …

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Thoughts on MySQL 5.6 new replication features

After playing a little bit with MySQL 5.6 (RC), and following closely on Giuseppe's MySQL 5.6 replication gotchas (and bugs), I was having some thoughts.

These are shared for a few reasons:

  • Maybe I didn't understand it well, and someone could correct me
  • Or I understood it well, and my input could be of service to the developers
  • Or it could be of service to the users

InnoDB tables in mysql schema

The introduction of InnoDB tables in mysql makes for crash-safe replication information: the exact replication position (master log file+pos, relay log file+pos etc.) is updated on InnoDB tables; with innodb_flush_logs_at_trx_commit=1 this means replication status is durable and consistent with server data. This is …

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MySQL 5.6, GTID and performance_schema

Not much to add really to the bug I’ve filed here: bug#67159.

Again this GTID stuff looks good, but seems to prevent changes in the configuration of performance_schema, which I think is not appropriate, especially as P_S now has lots of extra goodies and after 5.6 will surely have even more.

Help me polish MySQL in openSUSE 12.2

If you are following news regarding openSUSE and MySQL, you probably already know, that we have both MySQL and MariaDB in openSUSE to allow users to choose what they want to use. And if these two options are not enough, we’ve got server:database repository with newest and greatest development versions of both and MySQL Cluster on to of that. I think all this is great and awesome, that we have all of that.

Now to the not so great part. Unfortunately I’m bare human, I have to eat, sleep and I have some work, some bugs that takes a lot more time that I expected, some school duties to take care of and of course openSUSE Conference to organize! So as a result of all that, I can’t polish MySQL and MariaDB as much I would love to. And on top of that, I’m not …

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What is the proper size of InnoDB logs?

In one of my previous posts, “How to resize InnoDB logs?”, I gave the advice on how to safely change the size of transaction logs. This time, I will explain why doing it may become necessary.

A brief introduction to InnoDB transaction logs

The transaction logs handle REDO logging, which means they keep the record of all recent modifications performed by queries in any InnoDB table. But they are a lot more than just an archive of transactions. The logs play important part in the process of handling writes. When a transaction commits, InnoDB synchronously makes a note of any changes into the log, while updating the actual table files happens asynchronously and may take place much later. Each log entry is assigned a Log Sequence Number – an incremental value that always uniquely identifies a change.

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The Problems of Managing MySQL’s Configuration

I want to keep a record of the configuration of the MySQL servers I manage. The configuration of some servers differs from others and over time the configuration may vary, partly as a result of upgrades in the mysql version or the use of the particular mysql instance, so tracking this is important.

Configuration items in MySQL can be thought of in 2 separate parts: the static configuration files which determine the behaviour of the server when it starts up (my.cnf) and the running configuration of the server in question. The latter information is usually obtained by running SHOW GLOBAL VARIABLES and SHOW SLAVE STATUS if the server is a slave.

I’d also like to compare the 2 sets of configuration so I can see if a local change has been made to the running server which is not reflected in its configuration file. I might want to correct this, or at least be aware of it.

However, collecting and …

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Showing entries 31 to 40 of 95
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