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Displaying posts with tag: drizzle (reset)
30 configuration options and counting

While Domas may have rather effictively trolled the discussion with his post on howto configure table/user statistics (which gave me a good chuckle I do have to say), it’s at least incorrect for Percona Server as you have to enable the “userstat” server option :)

That being said, once enabled there are no extra configuration variables to think about. This is a huge advantage over configuring PERFORMANCE_SCHEMA - which has a total of THIRTY configuration options (31 if you include the global enable/disable option).

Some of these thirty odd configuration variables are only going to matter if you’re loading your own plugins, and even then, it’s probably only going to matter if they use the MySQL mutex implementations rather than, …

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Refactoring Internal temporary tables (another stab at it)

A few weekends ago, I started to again look at the code in Drizzle for producing internal temporary tables. Basically, we have a few type of tables:

  • Standard
  • Temporary (from CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE)
  • Temporary (from ALTER TABLE)
  • Internal temporary (to help with query execution)

If you’re lucky enough to be creating one of the first three types, you go through an increasingly lovely pile of code that constructs a nice protobuf message about what the table should look like and hands all responsibility over to the storage engine as to how to do that. The basic idea is that Drizzle gets the heck out of the way and lets the storage engine do its thing. This code path looks rather different than what we inherited from MySQL. For a start, we actually have a StorageEngine object rather than just lumping everything into the handler (which we correctly name a Cursor). However… the final …

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MySQL and the forks in the road

There's a lot of activity in the MySQL ecosystem currently. I've written an article for The H which takes a look at MySQL and the various forks and spinoffs to give an overview of where MySQL's community and close competition is currently at.
http://www.h-online.com/open/features/MySQL-and-the-forks-in-the-road-1829242.html

Which is bigger: MySQL or PostgreSQL?

From my previous posts, we have some numbers (excluding NDB) for the size of MySQL, so what about PostgreSQL? Here, I used PostgreSQL git trunk and classing things in the contrib/ directory as plugins. I put the number of lines of code in the src/backend/storage directory down as storage engines LoC but did not count it as non-kernel code.

Version Total LoC Plugin LoC Storage Engines LoC Remaining (kernel)
MySQL 5.5.30 858,441 2,706 171,009 684,726 (79% kernel)
MySQL 5.6.10 1,049,344 29,122 236,067 …
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MySQL modularity, are we there yet?

MySQL is now over four times the size than it was with MySQL 3.23. This has not come in the shape of plugins.

Have we improved modularity over time? I decided to take LoC count for plugins and storage engines (in the case of Drizzle, memory, myisam and innobase are storage engines and everything else comes under plugin). I’ve excluded NDB from these numbers as it is rather massive and is pretty much still a separate thing.

Version Total LoC Plugin LoC Storage Engines LoC Remaining (kernel)
MySQL 3.23.58 371,987 0 (0%) 176,276 195,711 (52% kernel)
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Other MySQL branch code sizes

Continuing on from my previous posts, MySQL code size over releases and MariaDB code size I’ve decided to also look into some other code branches. I’ve used the same methodology as my previous few posts: sloccount for C and C++ code only.

There are also other branches around in pretty widespread use (if only within a single company). I grabbed the Google, Facebook and Twitter patches and examined them too, along with Percona Server 5.1 and 5.5.

Codebase LoC (C, C++) +/- from MySQL
Google v4 patch 5.0.37 970,110
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unireg.h is finally gone

I got rid of unireg.cc way back in 2009 as I rewrote all the FRM related code inside Drizzle to instead use a nice protobuf based structure. If you’re wondering what was there, I just quote this part of pack_screens() from unireg.cc in MySQL 5.6:

start_row=4; end_row=22; cols=80; fields_on_screen=end_row+1-start_row;

We have gradually pulled things out of unireg.h over the years too. But, let’s go back to ask the question “What is UNIREG?”. To answer that, I’m going to quote from something that was current back when MySQL 3.22 was the latest and greatest:

In 1979, he developed an in-house database tool called UNIREG for managing databases. Since 1979, UNIREG has been rewritten in several different languages and extended to handle big databases.

No doubt the definition of big has changed for most people since then. If we …

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First version of Drizzle Tools for MySQL servers released

Today marks the first release of Drizzle Tools for MySQL servers.  Drizzle Tools aims to be a collection of useful utilities to use with MySQL servers based around the work on the Libdrizzle Redux project.

In this first version there is one utility in the tree called 'drizzle-binlogs'.  If you've seen me talk about this tool before it is because it used to be included in the Libdrizzle 5.1 source but has now been moved here to be developed independently.  For those who haven't 'drizzle-binlogs' is a tool which connects to a MySQL server as a slave, retrieves the binary log files and stores them locally.  This could be used as part of a backup solution or a rapid way to help create a new MySQL master server.

Due to the API changes before the Libdrizzle API became stable Drizzle Tools requires a minimum of Libdrizzle 5.1.3 to be …

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Fun with Coverity found bugs (Episode 1)

Taking the inspiration of Valeriy Kravchuk great series of blog posts “Fun with Bugs” (and not http://funwithbugs.com/ which is about both caring for and eating bugs), and since I recently went and run Coverity against Drizzle, I thought I’d have a small series of posts on bugs that it has found (and I’ve fixed).

An idea that has been pervasive in the Drizzle project (and one that I rather subscribe to) is that there is two types of correct: correct and obviously correct. Being obviously correct is much, much better than merely being correct.

The first category of problems that Coverity …

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Coverity scan for Drizzle

Coverity is a static analysis tool, which although proprietary itself does offer a free scanning service for free and open source software (which is great by the way, I totally owe people who make that happen a frosty beverage).

Prompted by someone volunteering to get MariaDB into the Coverity Scan, I realized that I hadn’t actually followed through with this for Drizzle. So, I went and submitted Drizzle. As a quick overview, this is the number of problems of each severity both projects got back:

Severity MariaDB Drizzle
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