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Displaying posts with tag: parallel (reset)
Data distribution in MySQL Cluster

MySQL Cluster distributes rows amongst the data nodes in a cluster, and also provides data replication. How does this work? What are the trade offs?

Table fragments

Tables are 'horizontally fragmented' into table fragments each containing a disjoint subset of the rows of the table. The union of rows in all table fragments is the set of rows in the table. Rows are always identified by their primary key. Tables with no primary key are given a hidden primary key by MySQLD.

By default, one table fragment is created for each data node in the cluster at the time the table is created.

Node groups and Fragment replicas

The data nodes in a cluster are logically divided into Node groups. The size of each Node group is controlled by the NoOfReplicas parameter. All data nodes in a Node group store the same data. In other words, where the NoOfReplicas parameter is two or greater, each …

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How fast is parallel replication? See it live today

I talked about parallel replication last month. Since then, there has been a considerable interest for this feature. As far as I know, Tungsten's is the only implementation of this much coveted feature, so I can only compare with MySQL native replication.
The most compelling question is "how fast is it?"
That's a tricky one. The answer is the same that I give when someone asks me "how fast is MySQL". I always say: it depends.
Running replication in a single thread is sometimes slower than the operations in the master. Many users complain that the single thread can't keep up with the master, and the slave lags behind. True. There is, however, a hidden benefit of single threaded replication: it requires less resources. There is no contention for writing on disk, no need to worry about several users blocking a …

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Advanced replication for the masses - Part II - Parallel replication
I hope you liked the first part of this series of lessons. And I really hope that you have followed the instructions and got your little replication cluster up and working.

If you haven't done that, thinking that you would spare your energies for more juicy matters, I have news for you. What I explained in the previous part is exactly what you need to do to set up parallel replication. With just a tiny additional detail.
For the sake of the diligent readers who have followed the instructions with the first lessons, I won't repeat them, but I'll invite you to set the environment as explained in the first part.
Once you have a cluster up and …

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Advanced replication for the masses - Part I - Getting started with Tungsten Replicator
MySQL DBAs and developers: oil your fingers and get ready to experience a new dimension of data replication. I am pleased to announce that Continuent has just released Tungsten Replicator 2.0, an open source data replication engine that can replace MySQL native replication with a set of advanced features.
A note about the source code. The current version of Tungsten Replicator available in the web site is free to use, but it is not yet the open source version. We need a few weeks more to extract the code from the enterprise tree and make a new build. But we did not want to delay the user experience. So everything …
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Low latency distributed parallel joins

When MySQL AB bought Sun Microsystems in 2008 (or did Sun buy MySQL?), most of the MySQL team merged with the existing Database Technology Group (DBTG) within Sun. The DBTG group had been busy working on JavaDB, Postgres and other DB related projects as well as 'High Availability DB' (HADB), which was Sun's name for the database formerly known as Clustra.

Clustra originated as a University research project which spun out into a startup company and was then acquired by Sun around the era of dot-com. A number of technical papers describing aspects of Clustra's design and history can be found online, and it is in many ways similar to Ndb Cluster, not just in their shared Scandinavian roots. Both are shared-nothing parallel databases originally aimed at the Telecoms market, supporting high availability and horizontal scalability. Clustra has an impressive feature set and …

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Some MySQL projects I think are cool - Spider Storage Engine

One thing that has puzzled me about MySQL Server is that it became famous for sharded scale-out deployments in well known web sites and yet has no visible support for such deployments. The MySQL killer feature for some time has been built-in asynchronous replication and gigabytes of blogs have been written about how to setup, use, debug and optimise replication, but when it comes to 'sharding' there is nothing built in. Perhaps to have attempted to implement something would have artificially constrained user's imaginations, whereas having no support at all has allowed 1,000 solutions to sprout? Perhaps there just wasn't MySQL developer bandwidth available, or perhaps it just wasn't the best use of the available time. In any case, it remains unclaimed territory to this day.

On first hearing of the Federated storage engine some years ago, …

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Ndb software architecture

I'm sure that someone else can describe the actual history of Ndb development much better, but here's my limited and vague understanding.

  • Ndb is developed in an environment (Ericsson AXE telecoms switch) where Ericsson's PLEX is the language of choice
    PLEX supports multiple state machines (known as blocks) sending messages (known as signals) between them with some system-level conventions for starting up, restart and message classes. Blocks maintain internal state and define signal handling routines for different signal types. Very little abstraction within a block beyond subroutines is supported. (I'd love to hear some more detail on PLEX and how it has evolved). This architecture maps directly to the AXE processor design (APZ) …
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Sorting a Terabyte in 197 seconds

Sorting a Terabyte in 197 seconds

I just returned from The 21st ACM Symposium on Parallelism in Algorithms and Architectures (SPAA), held in Calgary, where I gave a talk about my entry to the sorting contest.  I sorted 1TB in 197s on a 400-node machine at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, a record which still stands today.  (And it will likely remain standing, since terabyte sorting is now deprecated because it’s too fast.  Now the challenge is to sort 100TB.)

For many years Jim Gray ran a sorting contest to see how fast anyone could sort a terabtye worth of 100-byte records, how much data could be sorted in one minute, and how much data could be sorted for a penny.  After Jim’s disappearance at sea in January …

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