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Displaying posts with tag: scaling (reset)
Progress report on High Performance MySQL, Second Edition

It's been a while since I've written about progress on the book. I actually stopped working on it as much at the beginning of the month, because on October 31(st) I managed to finish a first draft of the last big chapter! Now I'm back to full-time work at my employer, and I'm working on the book in the evenings and weekends only. Read on for details of what I've been working on and what's next in the pipeline.

Scaling Drupal

John Quinn writes about Scaling Drupal he is taking a one step at a time approach and is still writing his 4th and 5 stages.

His first step obviously is separating the drupal from a separate database server, and he chooses mysql for this purpose, moving your DB to a different machine is a good thing to do.

However then he gets this crazy idea of using NFS to share his his drupal shared files :(
(he even dares to mention that the setup ease is good) Folks, we abandonned NFS in the late nineties. NFS is still a recipe for disaster, it has performance issues , it as stability issues (stale locks), and no security admin in his right mind will tolerate portmap to be running in his DMZ.
(Also think about the IO path that …

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High Performance MySQL, Second Edition: Replication, Scaling and High Availability

Continuing in the tradition, which I hope has been as helpful to you as it has been to me, I'm opening the floor for suggestions on chapter 9 of the upcoming High Performance MySQL, Second Edition. Unlike the other chapters for which I've listed outlines, this one isn't substantially written yet. It's in detailed outline form at this point (a tactic that has worked very well for us so far -- I'll write about that someday).

I'm trying to get feedback much earlier in this chapter's lifecycle, for several reasons. Two of the most important are that this is one of the first chapters I've had a chance to really take from scratch, and the chapters I haven't written from scratch have been harder to organize, as you've probably seen from the last few outlines I posted. There's a lot of value in working top-down on this deep encyclopedia-style material.

Read on for the outline and more thoughts I just can't keep to myself.

Coming soon: High Performance MySQL, Second Edition

We've begun writing the second edition of the now-classic High Performance MySQL. "We" means co-authors Arjen Lentz, Baron Schwartz, Vadim Tkachenko, and Peter Zaitzev. O'Reilly is still the publisher, and Andy Oram is still the editor. With a team like this, I think the second edition will be a book you don't want to miss. Though in theory we're revising the first edition, the truth is we're starting from scratch and re-writing the book, and significantly expanding it at the same time. A lot has changed since Jeremy and Derek wrote the first edition. Today's MySQL deployments push the limits further than many people thought possible a few years ago. We'll teach you how they do it.

BLOB locators + BLOB streaming + Replication = Yeah!

On the MySQL Conference & Expo 2007, I had the chance of meeting up with Paul (the author of PBXT) and Mikael. We briefly touched the topic of the BLOB Streaming Protocol that Paul is working on, which I find really neat. On the way back home, I traveled with Anders Karlsson (one of MySQL:s Sales Engineers), who is responsible for the BLOB Locator worklog and he described the concepts from his viewpoint.

Since I work with replication, these things got me thinking on what the impact is for replication and how it affects usability, efficiency, and scale-out. Being a RESTful guy, I started thinking about URIs both when …

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Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 3

In the first two articles in this series, I discussed archiving basics, relationships and dependencies, and specific archiving techniques for online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers. This article covers how to move the data from the OLTP source to the archive destination, what the archive destination might look like, and how to un-archive data. If you can un-archive easily and reliably, a whole new world of possibilities opens up.

Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 2

In the first article in this series on archiving strategies for online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers, I covered some basics: why to archive, and what to consider when gathering requirements for the archived data itself. This article is more technical. I want to help you understand how to choose which rows are archivable, and how to deal with complex data relationships and dependencies. In that context, I'll also discuss a few concrete archiving strategies, their strengths and shortcomings, and how they can satisfy your requirements, especially requirements for data consistency, which as you will see is one of the most difficult problems in archiving.

Archive strategies for OLTP servers, Part 1

In May 2005, I wrote a widely-referenced article about how to efficiently archive and/or purge data from online transaction processing (OLTP) database servers. That article focused on how to write efficient archiving SQL. In this article I'll discuss archiving strategy, not tactics. OLTP servers tend to have complex schemas, which makes it important and sometimes difficult to design a good archiving strategy.

Slides from PHP Vancouver

From the keynote presentation this past Tuesday:
http://krow.net/talks/ScalingVancouver2007.pdf

I have an audio recording of the talk as well but it is in poor shape. If I can clean it up I will post it as well.

Genesis: Application Clustering

In the previous article I discussed using Read Replication Clustering to scale out reads for a website. What I will now do is describe a refined approach to the problem of scaling by creating "Application Clusters with Replication".

A common approach to website design is that a web designer creates a website and decides that search is a feature that they want to implement. If they use the MyISAM engine this means that they can add fulltext indexes to their tables and then make use of them in queries. I will ignore the case where the developer decides that an unanchored LIKE clause is an appropriate solution, since this developer will quickly hit a wall on performance and will need to learn what a fulltext index is.

So the developer adds a fulltext and is good to go? Sounds like an easy solution?

If the site the developer has written begins to see significant traffic then one of three things will occur. …

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