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Displaying posts with tag: CATALOG (reset)
Hibernate database catalog multitenancy

Introduction As I explained in this article, multitenancy is an architectural pattern which allows you to isolate customers even if they are using the same hardware or software components. There are multiple ways you can achieve multitenancy, and in this article, we are going to see how you can implement a multitenancy architecture using the … Continue reading Hibernate database catalog multitenancy →

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A beginner’s guide to database multitenancy

Introduction In software terminology, multitenancy is an architectural pattern which allows you to isolate customers even if they are using the same hardware or software components. Multitenancy has become even more attractive with the widespread adoption of cloud computing. A relational database system provides a hierarchy structure of objects which, typically, looks like this: catalog … Continue reading A beginner’s guide to database multitenancy →

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Multi-tenancy Drizzle

My previous post focused on some of the problems of doing multi-tenant MySQL.

One of the reasons why I started hacking on Drizzle was that the multi-tenancy options for MySQL just weren’t very good (this is also the reason why I run my blog in a VM and not a shared hosting solution).

What you really want is to be able to give your users access to a virtual database server. What you don’t want is to be administering a separate database server for each of your users. What you want are CATALOGs.

A CATALOG is a collection of SCHEMAs (which have TABLEs in them). Each CATALOG is isolated from all the others. Once you connect to a catalog, that’s it. They are entirely separate units. There are no cross-catalog queries or CHANGE CATALOG commands. It is as if each catalog is its own database server.

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