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Showing entries 1 to 22

Displaying posts with tag: innovation (reset)

MongoDB in 2013 -- A Year in Review
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It's again that time of the year. Analysts are spending oceans of words to predict the future, companies are making plans for the next year and people are resting and enjoying the break with their families. To me, this is the perfect time to reflect on my choices, the direction I'm headed to and consider if I still love what I do.

At the beginning of the year I decided to join MongoDB (formerly 10gen). The more I think about it, the more I realize I've been wrong. Yes, it's been the worst decision in my life not to join MongoDB when I was first offered the opportunity years ago. At that time an

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MongoDB in 2013 -- A Year in Review
+0 Vote Up -1Vote Down
It's again that time of the year. Analysts are spending oceans of words to predict the future, companies are making plans for the next year and people are resting and enjoying the break with their families. To me, this is the perfect time to reflect on my choices, the direction I'm headed to and consider if I still love what I do.

At the beginning of the year I decided to join MongoDB (formerly 10gen). The more I think about it, the more I realize I've been wrong. Yes, it's been the worst decision in my life not to join MongoDB when I was first offered the opportunity years ago. At that time an

  [Read more...]
MySQL BLOB meets Amazon S3: Weblobs explained
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Cloud-powered BLOB type provides ACID guarantees and fast direct access to blobs via Web URLs.

Storing unstructured data

Typically unstructured data (such as pictures, media files, documents)

a) Is either stored on the file system, unlike the related with it relational data which is stored in the database. This is well known, “convenient” practice that allows fast access to files but offers no transactional story and no unified data management (for db and filesystem)

b) Or is stored in BLOBs. This ensures transactional consistency and reduces management complexities, but is really bad for performance and scalability.

We took advantage of the cloud, and came up with an upgrade to the BLOB – a solution that combines the benefits of the two.

Weblob data type

Weblob is a new data type that is


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Interview with Tomas Ulin at the MySQL Innovation Day
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MySQL Innovation Day (http://www.mysql.com/news-and-events/events/innovation-day/) held on June 5, 2012 was a great event for the MySQL engineers, users and customers to gather, share and network. I was able to get a few minutes with Tomas Ulin, Vice President of MySQL Engineering at Oracle, to ask him some questions. Here are the highlights of my interview with Tomas.


Monica: This was the first MySQL Innovation Day, correct?  Why now, what was the strategy behind hosting this kind of event?

Tomas: In the last year, we have rolled out an incredible number of MySQL events worldwide – some targeted at developers that are new to MySQL and others for the MySQL savvy. At the MySQL Innovation Day, our first event of this kind,, we had a number of


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Mixed signals in IT’s great war over IP
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Recent news that Microsoft and Barnes & Noble agreed to partner on the Nook e-reader line rather than keep fighting over intellectual property suggests the prospect of more settlement and fewer IP suits in the industry. However, the deal further obscures the blurry IP and patent landscape currently impacting both enterprise IT and consumer technology.

It is good to see settlement — something I’ve been calling for, while also warning against patent and IP aggression. However, this settlment comes from the one conflict in this ongoing war that was actually shedding some light on the matter, rather than further complicating it.

See the full article at TechNewsWorld.

Replication stars
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Working with replication, you come across many topologies, some of them sound and established, some of them less so, and some of them still in the realm of the hopeless wishes. I have been working with replication for almost 10 years now, and my wish list grew quite big during this time. In the last 12 months, though, while working at Continuent, some of the topologies that I wanted to work with have moved from the cloud of wishful thinking to the firm land of things that happen. My quest for star replication starts with the most common topology. One master, many slaves.

Fig 1. Master/Slave topology

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Economy up or down, can open source come out on top?
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We’ve written about how a bad economy is indeed good for open source software. We’ve also recognized that with open source software’s maturity and place at the enterprise software table, a bad economy can be a double-edged sword for open source since the failure or fade of large enterprise customers, say big banks, hurts open source vendors right alongside traditional software providers.

What is interesting is that after a couple of years of economic rebuilding, we’ve seen recently how open source is being driven by innovation,

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Usability improvements in Tungsten Replicator 2.0.4
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If you love a software product, you should try to improve it, and not be afraid of criticizing it. This principle has guided me with MySQL (where I have submitted many usability bugs, and discussed interface with developers for years), and it proves true for Tungsten Replicator as well. When I started working at Continuent, while I was impressed by the technology, I found the installation procedure and the product logs quite discouraging. I would almost say disturbing. Fortunately, my colleagues have agreed on my usability focus, and we can enjoy some tangible improvements. I have already mentioned the new installation procedure, which requires just one command to install a full master/slave cluster. I would like to show how you can  [Read more...]
Software patents, prior art, and revelations of the Peer to Patent review
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A href="http://us1.campaign-archive1.com/?u=33d934c165e69e4b507504c2b&id=8771dc3ae5&e=77c352ede8#mctoc1">report
from the Peer to Patent initiative shows
that the project is having salutary effects on the patent system.
Besides the greater openness that Peer to Patent promotes in
evaluating individual patent applications, it is creating a new
transparency and understanding of the functioning of the patent system
as a whole. I'll give some background to help readers understand the
significance of Manny Schecter's newsletter item, which concerns prior
art that exists outside of patents. I'll add my own comments about
software patents.


Let's remind ourselves of the basic rule of patenting: no one












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Why software startups decide to patent ... or not
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Guest blogger Pamela Samuelson is the Richard M. Sherman Distinguished Professor of Law and Information at the University of California, Berkeley. She teaches courses on intellectual property, cyberlaw, and information privacy, and she has written and spoken extensively about the challenges that new information technologies pose for traditional legal regimes. A version of this material is scheduled to appear in the November 2010 issue of Communications of the ACM.

Two-thirds of the approximately 700 software entrepreneurs who participated in the 2008 Berkeley Patent Survey report that they neither have nor are seeking patents for innovations embodied in their products and services. These entrepreneurs rate patents as the least important mechanism among seven options for attaining

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How do we measure innovation?
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In response to the IEEE's report on Patent Power, which lists the top companies ranked by number of patents, Ari Shahdadi and Brad Burnham made trenchant comments in email that I thought were worth sharing (with their permission):


Ari wrote:


The main article is sad to read, with choice quotes like this: "Clearly, the global recession seriously hampered innovation in the United States." If I'd like to do anything, it's end the use of patenting statistics as a metric for innovative activity, especially by groups like the IEEE.





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Web Based Seminars (aka Webinars), why not?
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On Thursday the 8th, we delivered the most successful italian MySQL webinar ever. We had about 350 registrations, thanks for your support and constant participation!
We also awarded a wonderful MySQL t-shirt to the one who first answered correctly to a trivia question, congratulations to the winner.

Looking into the story of italian webinars, here is the ranking in terms of registrations:
  • Getting Started with MySQL on Windows
  • Scalable MySQL High Availability Architectures
  • A guide to Scaling MySQL
  • MySQL Performance Tuning - Top 5 Tips
  • Introducing MySQL 5.0
  • If you were unable to participate you can click here (http://www.mysql.it/news-and-events/on-demand-webinars/) and listen



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    Oracle buys Sun, but does it buy open source?
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    The big news to kick off this week was Oracle’s announced acquisition of Sun Microsystems. There is already a lot of discussion of the integration challenges, how Oracle is getting into hardware (or as Matt Asay describes it, having an ‘iPod moment’) and of course, the implications for open source software. What stands out to me is the fact that the world’s biggest proprietary database player — one of few software giants that still sells and supports primarily proprietary software — will own the world’s most popular open source database, MySQL. It is unclear how significantly MySQL figures into the deal, but given Sun spent $1b acquiring it and further

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    Golden Rules for Contribution-based Communities
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    There are some basic, golden rules when it comes to having a vibrant community of contributors.

    The following are rules I have extracted and learned based on my experience managing and working with engineers actively involved and participating in the Apache/Derby, PostgreSQL and MySQL open-source communities. These rules are also based on extensive discussions with many folks involved with the MySQL community, with the PostgreSQL community and with the Apache/Derby (Java DB) community, over many years.

    Before I go through these rules, I would like to thank Marten Mickos for having suggested some of the headings for these rules. (I originally had much longer headings for all of them.) I would also like to thank many of MySQL, PostgreSQL and Java DB colleagues, as well as to many other colleagues involved in open-source development, for having

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    Golden Rules for Contribution-based Communities
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    There are some basic, golden rules when it comes to having a vibrant community of contributors.

    The following are rules I have extracted and learned based on my experience managing and working with engineers actively involved and participating in the Apache/Derby, PostgreSQL and MySQL open-source communities. These rules are also based on extensive discussions with many folks involved with the MySQL community, with the PostgreSQL community and with the Apache/Derby (Java DB) community, over many years.

    Before I go through these rules, I would like to thank Marten Mickos for having suggested some of the headings for these rules. (I originally had much longer headings for all of them.) I would also like to thank many of MySQL, PostgreSQL and Java DB colleagues, as well as to many other colleagues involved in open-source development, for having

      [Read more...]
    Golden Rules for Contribution-based Communities
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    There are some basic, golden rules when it comes to having a vibrant community of contributors.

    The following are rules I have extracted and learned based on my experience managing and working with engineers actively involved and participating in the Apache/Derby, PostgreSQL and MySQL open-source communities. These rules are also based on extensive discussions with many folks involved with the MySQL community, with the PostgreSQL community and with the Apache/Derby (Java DB) community, over many years.

    Before I go through these rules, I would like to thank Marten Mickos for having suggested some of the headings for these rules. (I originally had much longer headings for all of them.) I would also like to thank many of MySQL, PostgreSQL and Java DB colleagues, as well as to many other colleagues involved in open-source development, for having

      [Read more...]
    Mozilla Foundation Report for 2009 Week 1
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    This is Zak Greant's weekly report on his activities for the Mozilla Foundation from December 29th, 2008 to January 4th, 2009.

    Overview

    Another week of the Christmas and New Year holidays with many of my Mozilla colleagues unavailable. As with the previous week, I focused on 2009 program development and engagement.

    The program development work was in the form of brainstorming, planning and research for upcoming 2009 Mozilla activities.

    The engagement work focused on participating in the Mozilla blogorama. I kept up with Planet Mozilla, commented on blog posts I found interesting and continued a series of lightweight blog posts.

    More details on both activities follow:

    Program Development

    I finished drafting a new statement of work and sent this

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    Reminder: MySQL User Conference CfP ends in two weeks!
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    Reminders work. At least on me. I try to Get Things Done (TM) efficiently, but slips do happen. And when they do, reminding me has a good chance to influence my priorities. I hope I’m not alone in this fallibility.

    And therefore I want to remind you that you’ve still got two weeks to reply to our Call for Participation in the MySQL Conference and Expo in Santa Clara, California on 20-23 April 2009.

    A few items to remember:

    • We have plenty already, but we’re looking for more proposals. It does make our selection process harder (that’s when the Program Committee sits down and asks itself “what’s right for the
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    30 terabyte per night
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    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is making news once more. Its projected data inflow of 30 Terabyte per night has caught to the imagination of slashdot readers. Why is this interesting? Because it was not news to me.

    You may recall that I was enthusiast about a Astronomy, Petabytes, and MySQL at the MySQL Users Conference 2008, and with reason. The engineers at Stanford have a plan of storing petabytes of data into a cluster of MySQL databases.
    The technical





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    MySQL UC2009 - Little innovation so far
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    MySQL Community, I am disappointed.

    Innovation Everywhere is the theme of the Users Conference and Expo 2009, and yet, in the proposals that I have received so far I have seen very little innovation. Few daring technical proposals. Few accounts of truly novel exploits.

    Instead, I've seen very similar topics to past years, without the spark of experimentation that we look for as an extra spice for the year where the topic is Innovation.

    If I look at Planet MySQL, I see plenty of movement. New projects, new releases of old projects, people trying exciting technologies, others combining old technologies with new platforms. And yet, some of the people who are posting these exciting news are proposing the same old story.

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    The MySQL Model
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    I have always considered MySQL (http://www.mysql.com/) as the best model for open source companies. Their approach to the market, the execution of different business models, their relation with the community or the way their work internally as a virtual organization have shown an innovative and successful example of how an IT company in the 21st century can be managed.

    The agreement with Sun, announced last January, was the crowning point of all the efforts put in the company since the beginning, proving the success of their innovative model. Since then I have been trying to put some order in my ideas about their model and summarize them in a few blocks that could serve as a quick guide to emulate their success. I discussed my

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    ZFS Puts Net App Viability at Risk?
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    About a month ago, Network Appliance sued Sun to try to stop the competitive impact of ZFS on their business.

    I can understand why they're upset - when Linux first came on the scene in Sun's core market, there were some here who responded the same way, asking "who can we sue?" But seeing the future, we didn't file an injunction to stop competition - instead, we joined the free software community and innovated.

    One of the ways we innovated was to create a magical file system called ZFS - which enables expensive, proprietary storage to be replaced with commodity disks and general purpose servers. Customers save a ton of money - and administrators save a ton of time. The economic impact is staggering - and understandably threatening to Net App and other proprietary companies. As is all free innovation, at some level.

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    Showing entries 1 to 22

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