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Displaying posts with tag: master (reset)

MySQL replication in action - Part 3: all-masters P2P topology
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Previous episodes:

MySQL replication monitoring 101MySQL replication in action - Part 1: GTID & CoMySQL replication in action - Part 2 - Fan-in topology


In the …



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Introducing MySQL Performance Analyzer
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At Yahoo, we manage a massive number of MySQL databases spread across multiple data centers. 

In order to identify and respond to performance issues, we rely on an extremely lightweight and robust web based tool to proactively investigate the issues in them.

The tool has real time tracking features and continually gathers the most important performance metrics, provides visualization and statistical analysis for quickly identifying performance patterns, bottlenecks and possible tuning opportunities.

Features

Lightweight Agentless Java Web Application
Rich User Interface
Gather and Store performance …


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Multiple masters : attraction to the stars
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In the last 10 years I have worked a lot with replication systems, and I have developed a keen interest in the topic of multiple masters in a single cluster. My interest has a two distinct origins:

  • On one hand, I have interacted countless times with users who want to use a replication system as a drop-in replacement for a single server. In many cases, especially when users are dealing with applications that are not much flexible or modular, this means that the replication system must have several points of data entry, and such points must work independently and in symbiosis with the rest of the nodes.
  • On the other hand, I …
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tpm, the multi-master composer
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Multi master topologies blues

Tungsten Replicator is a powerful replication engine that, in addition to providing the same features as MySQL Replication, can also create several topologies, such as

  • all-masters: every master in the deployment is a master, and all nodes are connected point-to-point, so that there is no single point of failure (SPOF).
  • fan-in: Several masters can replicate into a single slave;
  • star: It’s an all-masters topology, where one node acts as hub which simplifies the deployment at the price of creating a SPOF.

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Replication stars
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Working with replication, you come across many topologies, some of them sound and established, some of them less so, and some of them still in the realm of the hopeless wishes. I have been working with replication for almost 10 years now, and my wish list grew quite big during this time. In the last 12 months, though, while working at Continuent, some of the topologies that I wanted to work with have moved from the cloud of wishful thinking to the firm land of things that happen. My quest for star replication starts with the most common topology. One master, many slaves.

Fig 1. Master/Slave topology

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Memory tuning fast paced ETL
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Dear Kettle friends,

on occasion we need to support environments where not only a lot of data needs to be processed but also in frequent batches.  For example, a new data file with hundreds of thousands of rows arrives in a folder every few seconds.

In this setting we want to use clustering to use “commodity” computing resources in parallel.  In this blog post I’ll detail how the general architecture would look like and how to tune memory usage in this environment.

Clustering was first created around the end of 2006.  Back then it looked like this.

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MySQL replication for demanding users
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I have been working with MySQL replication for quite a while. I have dealt with simple replication setups and I have experimented with complex ones. Five years ago I wrote an article about advanced MySQL replication, which was mostly a dream on what you could do with imagination and skill, but the matter from that article is still not even remotely ready for production. Yet, since that article, I have been approached by dozens of people who wanted to know how to make the multiple master dream become reality. To all of them, I had to say, "sorry, …

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Setting up Master-Slave Replication with MySQL
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Replication enables data from one MySQL server to be replicated on one or more other MySQL servers. Replication is mostly used as scale-out solution. In such a solution, all writes and updates take place on the master server, while reads take place on one or more slaves. This model is actually known as master-slave replication and this is the kind of replication that I will be setting up in this post.

A first look at delayed replication in MySQL 5.6
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If you like fresh features, you should not miss this one. MySQL 5.6.2 includes, among other improvements, the implementation of Time delayed replication, a feature that lets you tell the slave not to apply changes from the master immediately, but to wait N seconds.

The feature is documented in WL#344. (There was a …

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Statement-based vs Row-based Replication
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Replication as most people know it, has mostly been SQL statement propagation from master to slave. This is known as "statement-based" replication. But there is also another kind of replication that is available, "the row-based replication" and that has quite a lot of benefits. In this post I intend on highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of both the types of replication to help you choose the best one. I also follow up with my own recommendation.

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