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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 72 Next 30 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: patents (reset)

Mixed signals in IT’s great war over IP
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Recent news that Microsoft and Barnes & Noble agreed to partner on the Nook e-reader line rather than keep fighting over intellectual property suggests the prospect of more settlement and fewer IP suits in the industry. However, the deal further obscures the blurry IP and patent landscape currently impacting both enterprise IT and consumer technology.

It is good to see settlement — something I’ve been calling for, while also warning against patent and IP aggression. However, this settlment comes from the one conflict in this ongoing war that was actually shedding some light on the matter, rather than further complicating it.

See the full article at TechNewsWorld.

So how does OIN help MySQL, really?
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With apologies to Planet MySQL readers. This post is about MySQL, but it is not technical, and probably not at all interesting to many of my usual readers. But it didn't fit in a tweet...

The Open Invention Network announced that its members have agreed to broaden the scope of the "protection" that it offers its members against software patent attacks against "The Linux System". Simon Phipps, a former Sun collague whom I follow on Twitter, covered the OIN in a very informative InfoWorld piece:

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451 CAOS Links 2011.10.25
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Microsoft: “more than half your Android devices are belong to us”. And more

# Microsoft claimed that more than half of the world’s ODM industry for Android and Chrome devices is now under license to Microsoft’s patent portfolio following its agreement with Compal Electronics.

# Hadapt expanded its board of directors and confirmed its $9.5m series A funding round.

# Appcelerator entered into an

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Intellectual property gone mad
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Friday night, I tweeted a link to a Guardian article stating that app developers were withdrawing apps from Apple's app store and Google's Android market (and presumably also Amazon's app store), because they feared becoming victims of a patent trolling lawsuit. That tweet elicited some interesting responses that I'd like to discuss.

The insurance solution?

One option might be to rely on the insurance industry to solve the problem. "Isn't this what insurance is supposed to be for? Couldn't all these developers set up a fund for their common defense?" wrote @qckbrnfx. An interesting idea, and one I've considered. But that's a cure that seems worse than the disease. First,

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Four short links: 28 June 2011
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  • Networks Blocking Google TV -- the networks are carrying over their old distribution models: someone aggregates eyeballs and pays them for access. In their world view, Google TV is just another cable company. They're doubling down on this wholesale model, pulling out of Hulu and generally avoiding dealing with the people who ultimately watch their shows except through ad-filled shows on their corporate sites. (via Gina Trapani)
  • Mobile Market Snippets -- lots of numbers collected by Luke Wroblewski. After the Verizon iPhone launched in
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    Developer Week in Review: Apple devs cry "gimme shelter"
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    Another week of industry hijinks has passed, which means it must be time for another edition of the Developer Week in Review.

    Apple offers some cover

    After developer complaints that Apple was leaving them out to dry, in regards to the Lodsys patent threats being aimed their way, the House of Jobs stepped up to the plate and announced that they considered iOS developers to be covered by the existing licenses granted to Apple by Lodsys for in-game purchases.

    This is a bit of a good-news, bad-news story from an intellectual property perspective, as it doesn't offer any relief to non-Apple developers from the patents themselves. Apple paid off Lodsys,

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    Developer Week in Review
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    Spring came in like a lion here in the Northeast, with an April Fools' Day mini-blizzard, even though Lion itself isn't due to be released until summer at the earliest. While I waited for more hospitable weather to emerge, I've been huddled indoors working on a Kickstarter project with my son, and I will now shamelessly plug it: It's a high-powered replacement for the Wii sensor bar, designed to let you sit comfortably at the other end of a room while you use your Wii. You can read more about it here if you're interested.

    Meanwhile, there were the usual interesting developments in the developer world.

    Google: Now promoting gray as a  [Read more...]

    451 CAOS Links 2011.03.22
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    Paranoid Android. Canonical and Gnome. A new OSI. And more.

    Paranoid Android
    If you are interested in the potential violation of the GPL by the Android kernel you have probably already immersed yourself in the numerous blog posts published on the topic. If not, start with Sean Hogle’s analysis or Bradley M Kuhn’s overview of the original allegations and work backwards from there, not forgetting a detour for the obligatory Microsoft connection. Linus Torvalds said claim “seems totally bogus”. In the

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    451 CAOS Links 2010.09.21
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    Oracle launches Unbreakable Kernel, updates MySQL and Java plans. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca, and daily at Paper.li/caostheory
    “Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

    # Oracle launched its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel.

    # Oracle announced the release candidate of MySQL 5.5.

    # Oracle outlined its plans for Java platform. JavaWorld has the details.

    # Novell and SAP have collaborated on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP applications.

    # Mozilla


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    Why software startups decide to patent ... or not
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    Guest blogger Pamela Samuelson is the Richard M. Sherman Distinguished Professor of Law and Information at the University of California, Berkeley. She teaches courses on intellectual property, cyberlaw, and information privacy, and she has written and spoken extensively about the challenges that new information technologies pose for traditional legal regimes. A version of this material is scheduled to appear in the November 2010 issue of Communications of the ACM.

    Two-thirds of the approximately 700 software entrepreneurs who participated in the 2008 Berkeley Patent Survey report that they neither have nor are seeking patents for innovations embodied in their products and services. These entrepreneurs rate patents as the least important mechanism among seven options for attaining

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    My IFCLA banquet note about forking and IPR law
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    Below is my talk from the International Federation of Computer Law Associations conference banquet that took place in Helsinki last week. (It is post-edited to match what was actually said.)

    I have to say I was quite honored to be asked to speak. I was preceded by Finlands Minister of Justice Tuija Brax and later in the evening followed by imho Finlands funniest magician Martti Vannas. The dinner was set in the old stock market building of Helsinki, an exquisite restaurant now. I'm happy to say the talk was well received and many of the lawyers came to thank me afterwards.

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    Software patents are a bad legacy to leave behind
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    Glyn Moody has an interesting piece on Why Patents are Like Black Holes where he looks at the situation when a large patent holder goes bankrupt - or is about to. His point is that even if a company otherwise can go out of business cleanly, the patents often remain as a piece of "IPR" that can come back and haunt us like a zombie.

    Also Matt Asay recently weighed in on the subject:

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    Tilting at Windows. Why rejecting Microsoft’s OSS contributions is counter-productive
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    Or: “Don’t be a Cnut.”

    Yesterday I had a look at the response of the Joomla! community to the news that Microsoft had signed the Joomla! Contributor Agreement and was contributing code to the content management project.

    You probably won’t be surprised to find that some people don’t like the idea. The speed and vehemence of their rejection of Microsoft’s involvement in the project is entirely predictable, but none the less depressing for that.

    The usual complaints were rolled out:

  • you can’t trust Microsoft
  • when Microsoft contributes a major product to open source, we’ll listen
  • Microsoft is only doing this to sell more proprietary software
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    451 CAOS Links 2010.04.09
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    Perspectives on the IBM patent hoo-ha. Karmasphere lands funding. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
    “Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

    # IBM denied breaking its open source patent promise, claimed TurboHercules a member of organizations founded and funded by Microsoft, other competitors. Perspectives on the IBM patent hoo-ha: Florian Mueller, Simon Phipps, Matt Asay, Jim Zemlin, Eric Raymond.

    # Oracle will outline its strategy for MySQL at The


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    Four short links: 31 March 2010
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  • ZeroMQ -- bold claim of "Fastest. Messaging. Ever." LGPL, C++ with bindings for many languages, past version 2 already. (via edd on Twitter)
  • Prediction Market News (David Pennock) -- HSX is going to be a real marketplace with real $. The real HSX will of course say goodbye to the virtual specialist and the opening weekend adjust, two facets of the game that make it fun to play, but that create significant amounts of (virtual) wealth out of thin air. The Cantor Gaming group is engaged in other interesting initiatives. They are taking over a sportsbook in Las Vegas and turning it into more of a derivatives exchange with live in-game betting, a step toward my dream of a geek-friendly
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    How do we measure innovation?
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    In response to the IEEE's report on Patent Power, which lists the top companies ranked by number of patents, Ari Shahdadi and Brad Burnham made trenchant comments in email that I thought were worth sharing (with their permission):


    Ari wrote:


    The main article is sad to read, with choice quotes like this: "Clearly, the global recession seriously hampered innovation in the United States." If I'd like to do anything, it's end the use of patenting statistics as a metric for innovative activity, especially by groups like the IEEE.





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    451 CAOS Links 2009.10.06
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    Patents. M&A. Adoption. Business strategies. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
    “Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

    This bumper edition of 451 CAOS Links is brought to you courtesy of the Open World Forum’s temperamental wireless connection.

    Patents
    # Red Hat urged the Supreme Court to to make clear that it excludes software from patentability, while the SFLC and the FSF also filed briefs with the US Supreme Court arguing against software patents.

    Investment and M&A
    # The WSJ reported



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    451 CAOS Links 2009.08.07
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    Monty Widenius dissects MySQL’s dual license. Intuit moves to the EPL. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory on Twitter and Identi.ca
    “Tracking the open source news wires, so you don’t have to.”

    # Monty Widenius blogged about the apparent changes to the dual licensing of MySQL.

    # Intuit announced that its code.intuit.com will be moving from CPL to EPL.

    # Matt Asay asked whether Google’s open source advocacy might be a scheme to lower the value of patents.

    # Vision Mobile’s Andreas Constantinou explained the differences between open source licenses and governance models.


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    Microsoft contributes to Linux kernel: a CAOS Theory Q&A
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    Microsoft has announced that it is to contribute code to the Linux kernel development effort under the GNU General Public License (GPL) v2. What on earth does it all mean? Here’s our take on the situation. With thanks to Jay Lyman for his contribution to the following:

    Q. This is a joke, right?

    A. Not at all, although if any announcement is better suited to the image above, we can’t think of one. Microsoft has announced that it is going to contribute code to Linux under the GPLv2.

    Q. What code is Microsoft

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    451 CAOS Links 2009.03.17
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    Cloudera debuts Hadoop support with $5m in funding. The financial value of open source. More patent problems for Red Hat. Government open source projects on both sides of the pond. Symbian’s release plan. And more.

    Follow 451 CAOS Links live @caostheory

    Cloudera makes it official
    We previously reported the launch of Cloudera a new vendor set up to provide support for Apache Hadoop and related projects back in October. The company made its official debut in not-so polite open source society with the launch of its distribution for Hadoop and

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    Stop stupid Software Patents
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    If you read this blog, you should probably sign the petition !

    This site will go offline at the end of next month (July 2007)
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    At the end of next month (July 2007), this blog (and actually the entire site) will go offline.

    About eight months ago, I announced that I discontinued my work related to patent policy, but that I would keep this blog online for some more time as an archive of former postings. In the meantime, I became involved with football policy and confirmed that fact in this blog. Other than that, I have not made any new postings.

    I am glad to see that there was still a significant number of downloads of my electronic book as well as visits to this blog. However, if a blog ceases to deliver news, it becomes somewhat pointless after a while, and that’s why this site will be taken off the net within a little more than month. There will be no further announcements: at some point around the end of July (or maybe in early August), the site will simply be

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    Hacking Business Models
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    This weekend, Monty and I got together for a different kind of hacking session.

    Instead of developing software, we were working on developing a set of rough principles and rules for running a Free Software/Open Source business. We both have a good amount of experience working with various FLOSS projects (like Mozilla, MySQL, PHP, etc.) and FLOSS companies (like eZ Systems, Mozilla, MySQL, Zend, etc.) and hope that we can put this experience to good use.

    For me, this was a tremendous help - I’ve been putting off working on this for Foo Associates for some months now. It is much easier to work on meeting the needs of customers than it is to work on planning for the future.

    The notes are still extremely rough, but both Monty and I want to post them so that people

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    Helped Real Madrid with respect to European Parliament?s football policy resolution
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    About six months ago, I discontinued my work in the area of patent policy and announced my reasons in this blog article. At the time, I had already mentioned the possibility of becoming involved with football policy. And that has actually happened: From early February on, I have been lobbying and campaigning again, independently but with the official support of Real Madrid, in Brussels and Strasbourg.

    In late March, the European Parliament voted on a resolution on “the future of professional football in Europe”, and the European Commission is still working on a comprehensive

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    Withdrawal from the EPLA debate
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    I have decided to withdraw definitively from the political debate on the European Patent Litigation Agreement (EPLA). The process itself may very well take several more years, but I will not do any more lobbying nor make any more public statements in this regard.

    This year I made a lot of effort to inform politicians, the media and the public of the shortcomings of the present EPLA proposal, and I had the chance to make my contribution in the build-up to the European Parliament’s October 13 resolution, but I kept rather silent in recent weeks and will not speak out on this particular issue again. Until there is a new patent policy process in which I might participate, I will not comment on any patent-related issues. Last year I returned to the fray after

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    NoSoftwarePatents Award: drawing attention to European software patents
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    I wish I could say that Europe is free from software patents, but it is not. In contravention of the existing statutory law, the European Patent Office (EPO) continues to bend and break the law every day by issuing European software patents. And if the EPLA were to be ratified in its current form or any form near the present proposal, tens of thousands of existing European software patents would become strongly enforceable overnight.

    Earlier this year, the NoSoftwarePatents Award campaign started in order to draw attention to the EPO’s unacceptable granting practice. That award is not linked to the original

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    European Parliament specifies some of its EPLA-related concerns
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    In today’s vote on its patent policy resolution, the European Parliament approved the compromise text I had previously reported on, but it also voted in favor of a few amendments.

    The most notable amendment was number 7. It inserted the subclause “which address concerns about democratic control, judicial independence and litigation costs” into article 1. Two of those three concerns (judicial independence and litigation costs) had been mentioned by commissioner McCreevy in his speech in the EP on September 28. But it was a

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    The making of a compromise
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    In my most recent blog entry, I reported on the pretty reasonable compromise the three largest groups in the European Parliament have reached on the upcoming resolution on future European patent policy.

    Meanwhile, Dow Jones has quoted Erika Mann MEP, a German social democrat who is very much in favor of software patents, as saying that the EP has, through this compromise, effectively “postponed” a decision on the EPLA. I would not contradict that assessment. The proposed resolution neither urges the Commission to drop its EPLA-related plans nor does it support the EPLA in its present form. It ends up saying very

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    European Parliament: sensible compromise on EPLA-related resolution
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    In this blog I have repeatedly mentioned the European Parliament’s upcoming resolution on future European patent policy in general and the European Patent Litigation Agreement (EPLA) in particular. After a long and intense debate, which went mostly unnoticed by the general public, the three largest groups (international-level parties) in the EP - the conservative EPP-ED, the social democratic PES and the libertarian ALDE - yesterday sealed a pretty reasonable compromise.  Since those three groups have about 550 of the chamber’s 732 seats, it’s a mere formality for that compromise proposal to be carried by a solid majority. The vote will take place in Brussels on Thursday of next week (October 12).

    Initially, the chief negotiators of EPP-ED and ALDE wanted the EP to say an unequivocal Yes to the Commission’s plans to

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    EuroOSCON presentation slides uploaded
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    At the recent EuroOSCON 2006 conference in Brussels, I was both a keynoter and a session speaker. I have meanwhile uploaded my presentation slides for my keynote, New Innovation Models, Policy-Making and Lobbying, and for my additional speech, EU Software Patents Reloaded, to this Web site (as PDF files).

    Unfortunately, there was some confusion on the part of the organizers, due to which I only had my slides available for the keynote but not for the session on software patents. The organizers had

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    Showing entries 1 to 30 of 72 Next 30 Older Entries

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