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Displaying posts with tag: user management (reset)
MySQL 8.0.13: Change Current Password Policy

We have introduced a new policy for you to enforce on your non-privileged users. It requires their current password at the time they set a new password. It is optional and off by default. You can control it globally (for all non-privileged users) or on a per-user basis.…

Password reuse policy in MySQL 8.0

MySQL has various kinds of password policy enforcement tools: a password can expire (even automatically), can be forced to be of a certain length, contain amounts of various types of characters and be checked against a dictionary of common passwords or the user account name itself.…

MySQL 8.0.4 : New Default Authentication Plugin : caching_sha2_password

Starting with MySQL 8.0.4, we are changing the default authentication plugin for MySQL server from mysql_native_password to caching_sha2_password. Correspondingly, libmysqlclient will now use caching_sha2_password as the default authentication mechanism, too.

Why did we do it?

The advantage of mysql_native_password is that it support challenge-response mechanism which is very quick and does not require encrypted connection.…

MySQL 8.0: Making User Management DDLs Atomic

With MySQL 8.0, we are bringing in an important change in the way user management DDLs are executed.

Background

User management DDLs cover following user management actions:

  • Creating user/role (CREATE USER [IF NOT EXISTS] / CREATE ROLE [IF NOT EXISTS])
  • Altering user account properties (ALTER USER [IF EXISTS])
  • Dropping user/role from database (DROP USER [IF EXISTS] / DROP ROLE [IF EXISTS])
  • Granting/Revoking privileges to/from a user/role (GRANT/REVOKE)

Each of these administrative action can handle multiple entities as a part of single command.…

Creating user accounts on a secured MySQL server

After installing a MySQL database server and securing that installation with the mysql_secure_installation tool, you are locked out from remote access to perform any operation on the server. Since we all like the 'R' in RDBMS to stand for remote as well as relational, let's see how we can configure user credentials to provide remote access to the database server but still keep those credentials

Showing entries 1 to 5