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Showing entries 1 to 10 of 19 9 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: Software and tools (reset)

Munin graphing of MySQL
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While there are many graphing tools out there and we’ve used Munin for a while now.

The MySQL plugin for Munin had fallen out of date and the show engine innodb status output changed in 5.5 making some bits of the plugin simply not work any more. Also the show global status has some extra variables so there was a need to create new graphs.

All of these are now in the 2.1.8+ development releases of Munin.

Here are samples of the new/updated graphs.

Tables

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MySQL Connector/Arduino
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Chuck Bell, one of my former colleague from MySQL AB, has created a connector for Arduino to MySQL. So this allows Arduino code to be a direct client of a MySQL or MariaDB server, with Ethernet and WiFi shields supported.

With Arduino boards being used more and more, this can come in really handy – not only for retrieving (for instance) centralised configuration data, but also for logging. Useful stuff. Thanks Chuck!

Links

 Introducing MySQL Connector/Arduino 1.0.0 beta

Storage caching options in Linux 3.9 kernel
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dm-cache is (albeit still classified “experimental”) is in the just released Linux 3.9 kernel. It deals with generic block devices and uses the device mapper framework. While there have been a few other similar tools flying around, since this one has been adopted into the kernel it looks like this will be the one that you’ll be seeing the most in to the future. It saves sysadmins the hassle of compiling extra stuff for a system.

A typical use is for an SSD to cache a HDD. Similar to a battery backed RAID controller, the objective is to insulate the application from latency caused by the mechanical device, the most laggy part of which is seek time (measured in milliseconds). Giventhe  relatively high storage capacity of an SSD (in the hundreds of GBs), this allows you to mostly disregard the mechanical latency for writes and that’s very useful for

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Optimising Web Servers
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I was lucky enough to attend PyCon-AU recently and one talk in particular highlighted the process of web server optimisation.

Graham Dumpleton’s add-in talk Web Server Bottlenecks And Performance Tuning available on YouTube (with the majority of PyCon-AU talks)

The first big note at the beginning is that the majority of the delay in user’s perception of a website is caused by the browser rendering the page. Though not covered in the talk for those that haven’t used the tool YSlow (for Firefox and Chrome) or Google’s Developer

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Jetpants: a toolkit for huge MySQL topologies
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From a Tumblr engineering blog post:

Tumblr is one of the largest users of MySQL on the web. At present, our data set consists of over 60 billion relational rows, adding up to 21 terabytes of unique relational data. Managing over 200 dedicated database servers can be a bit of a handful, so naturally we engineered some creative solutions to help automate our common processes.

Today, we’re happy to announce the open source release of Jetpants, Tumblr’s in-house toolchain for managing huge MySQL database topologies. Jetpants offers a command suite for easily cloning replicas,

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MySQL Cluster on Raspberry Pi
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Earlier this week, Andrew Morgan wrote a piece on running MySQL Cluster on Raspberry Pi. Since the term “Cluster” is hideously overloaded, I’ll note that we’re talking about the NDB cluster storage engine here, a very specific architecture originally acquired by MySQL AB from Ericsson (telco).

Raspberry Pi is a new single-board computer based on the ARM processor series (same stuff that powers most mobile phones these days), and it can run Linux without any fuss. Interfaces include Ethernet, USB, and HDMI video, and the cost is $25-50. I’m looking

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Green HDs and RAID Arrays
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Some so-called “Green” harddisks don’t like being in a RAID array. These are primarily SATA drives, and they gain their green credentials by being able reduce their RPM when not in use, as well as other aggressive power management trickery. That’s all cool and in a way desirable – we want our hardware to use less power whenever possible! – but the time it takes some drives to “wake up” again is longer than a RAID setup is willing to tolerate. First of all, you may wonder why I bother with SATA disks at all for RAID. I’ve written about this before, but they simply deliver plenty for much less money. Higher RPM doesn’t necessarily help you for a db-related (random access) workload, and for tasks like backups which do have a lot of speed may not be a primary concern. SATA disks have a shorter command queue than SAS, so that means they might need  [Read more...]
HDlatency – now with quick option
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I’ve done a minor update to the hdlatency tool (get it from Launchpad), it now has a –quick option to have it only do its tests with 16KB blocks rather than a whole range of sizes. This is much quicker, and 16KB is the InnoDB page size so it’s the most relevant for MySQL/MariaDB deployments. However, I didn’t just remove the other stuff, because it can be very helpful in tracking down problems and putting misconceptions to rest. On SANs (and local RAID of course) you have things like block sizes and stripe sizes, and opinions on what might be faster. Interestingly, the real world doesn’t always agree with the opinions. We Mark Callaghan correctly pointed out when I first published it, hdlatency does not provide anything new in terms of functionality, the db IO tests of sysbench cover it all. A key advantage of hdlatency is  [Read more...]
MySQL data backup: going beyond mysqldump
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A user on a linux user group mailing list asked about this, and I was one of the people replying. Re-posting here as I reckon it’s of wider interest. > [...] tens of gigs of data in MySQL databases. > Some in memory tables, some MyISAM, a fair bit InnoDB. According to my > understanding, when one doesn’t have several hours to take a DB > offline and do dbbackup, there was/is ibbackup from InnoBase.. but now > that MySQL and InnoBase have both been ‘Oracle Enterprised’, said > product is now restricted to MySQL Enterprise customers.. > > Some quick searching has suggested Percona XtraBackup as a potential > FOSS alternative. > What backup techniques do people employ around these parts for backups > of large mixed MySQL data sets where downtime *must* be minimised? > > Has your backup plan ever been put to the test? You  [Read more...]
Importing a file dumped from MySQL with mysqldump into drizzle
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As a big fan of new technology, we try to keep up to date with what’s happening in the industry. As such, I decided to start using drizzle on my development machine since they announced GA this week. First exercise: import a file dumped from a MySQL server I don’t have access to into drizzle. Normally, you can use drizzledump on the mysql server and make it dump a drizzle compatible file. Not in this case, so I decided to sed my way through the various errors. Not pretty, and I hope that at some point we’ll have a tool that can convert a mysqldump into a drizzle compatible file, but it works for now. Here’s what I had to do. Note that this is by no means complete or comes with any guarantees, it’s just a starting  [Read more...]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 19 9 Older Entries

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