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Showing entries 1 to 10 of 22 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: Good practice / Bad practice (reset)

Motivation to Migrate RDBMS
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Companies that use a standard edition of Oracle’s database software should be aware that a rapidly approaching deadline could mean increased licensing costs.

Speaking from experience (at both MySQL AB and Open Query), typically, licensing/pricing changes such as these act as a motivator for migrations.

Migrations are a nuisance (doesn’t matter from/to what platform) and are best avoided as they’re intrinsically …

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Slow Query Log Rotation
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Some time ago, Peter Boros at Percona wrote this post: Rotating MySQL slow logs safely. It contains good info, such as that one should use the rename method for rotation (rather than copytruncate), and then connect to mysqld and issue a FLUSH LOGS (rather than send a SIGHUP signal).

So far so good. What I do not agree with is the additional construct to prevent slow queries from being written during log rotation. The author’s rationale is that if too many items get written while the rotation is in process, this can block threads. I understand this, but let’s …

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Hint of the day: Warning level in Error Log to see Aborted Connections
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log_warnings = 2

Yields useful information in the MariaDB or MySQL error log file (or syslog on Debian/Ubuntu) you don’t want to miss out on.

You will know about aborted connections, which are otherwise only visible through global status as Aborted_connects (lost connection before they completed authentication) and Aborted_clients (cut fully authenticated connection).

It looks like

130523 2:14:05 [Warning] Aborted connection 173629 to db: 'unconnected' user: 'someapp' host: '' (Unknown error)

You will know when, where from, and if for instance a wrong …

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InnoDB without PRIMARY KEY
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Having an InnoDB table without a PRIMARY KEY is not good. Many have known this for years, but exact opinions as to why have differed. From observation, it was clear to me that it impacted performance.

InnoDB stores its row data in the leaf nodes of the primary key B+tree structure, that means that it can’t work without… so if you don’t specify a PK, it makes one up. Seems pretty innocuous and shouldn’t actually perform any worse than an auto-inc field. Except that in reality the performance can be much much worse. Annoying. Naturally we recommend clients to always have a PK (auto-inc, a composite of foreign keys, or if need be a natural key) but production …

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Serving Clients Rather than Falling Over
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Dawnstar Australis (yes, nickname – but I know him personally – he speaks with knowledge and authority) updates on The Real Victims Of The Click Frenzy Fail: The Australian Consumer after his earlier post from a few months ago.

Colourful language aside, I believe he rightfully points out the failings of the organising company and the big Australian retailers. From the Open Query perspective we can just review the situation where sites fall over under load. Contrary to what they …

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One-way Password Crypting Flaws
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I was talking with a client and the topic of password crypting came up. From my background as a C coder, I have a few criteria to regard a mechanism to be safe. In this case we’ll just discuss things from the perspective of secure storage, and validation in an application.

  1. use a digital fingerprint algorithm, not a hash or CRC. A hash is by nature lossy (generates evenly distributed duplicates) and a CRC is intended to identify bit errors in transmitted data, not compare potentially different data.
  2. Store/use all of the fingerprint, not just part (otherwise it’s lossy again).
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What a Hosting Provider did Today
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I found Dennis the Menace, he now has a job as system administrator for a hosting company. Scenario: client has a problem with a server becoming unavailable (cause unknown) and has it restarted. MySQL had some page corruption in the InnoDB tablespace.

The hosting provider, being really helpful, goes in as root and first deletes ib_logfile* then ib* in /var/lib/mysql. He later says “I am sorry if I deleted it. I thought I deleted the log only. Sorry again.”  Now this may appear nice, but people who know what they’re doing with MySQL will realise that deleting the iblogfiles actually destroys data also. MySQL of course screams loudly that while it has …

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On Password Strength
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XKCD (as usual) makes a very good point – this time about password strength, and I reckon it’s something app developers need to consider urgently. Geeks can debate the exact amount of entropy, but that’s not really the issue: insisting on mixed upper/lower and/or non-alpha and/or numerical components to a user password does not really improve security, and definitely makes life more difficult for users.

So basically, the functions that do a “is this a strong password” should seriously reconsider their approach, particularly if they’re used to have the app decide whether to accept the password as “good enough” …

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MySQL data backup: going beyond mysqldump
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A user on a linux user group mailing list asked about this, and I was one of the people replying. Re-posting here as I reckon it’s of wider interest.

> [...] tens of gigs of data in MySQL databases. > Some in memory tables, some MyISAM, a fair bit InnoDB. According to my > understanding, when one doesn’t have several hours to take a DB > offline and do dbbackup, there was/is ibbackup from InnoBase.. but now > that MySQL and InnoBase have both been ‘Oracle Enterprised’, said > product is now restricted to MySQL Enterprise customers.. > > Some quick searching has suggested Percona XtraBackup as a potential > FOSS alternative. > …

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Challenge: identify this pattern in datadir
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You take a look at someone’s MySQL (or MariaDB) data directory, and see

bar -> foo

  1. What’s the issue? Identify pattern.
  2. What does it mean?  Consequences.
  3. Is there any way it can be safe and useful/usable? Describe.

Good luck!

Showing entries 1 to 10 of 22 10 Older Entries

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