Showing entries 1 to 10 of 25
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: Good practice / Bad practice (reset)
On Open Source and Business Choices

Open Source is a whole-of-process approach to development that can produce high-quality products better tailored to users’ real world needs.  A key reason for this is the early feedback cycle built into that complete process.

Simply publishing something under an Open Source license (while not applying Open Source development processes) does not yield the same quality and other benefits.  So, not all Open Source is the same.

Publishing source of a product “later” (for instance when the monetary benefit has diminished for the company) is meaningless.  In this scenario, there is no “Open Source benefit” to users whatsoever, it’s simply a proprietary product. There is no opportunity for the client to make custom modifications or improvements, or ask a third party to work on such matters – neither is there any third party opportunity to verify and validate either code …

[Read more]
Choosing Whether to Migrate to Another Database: Uber

Uber Engineering explains the technical reasoning behind its switch in database technologies, from Postgres to MySQL:

These things are always an interesting read, because it looks at one company’s decision making process and operational steps.

At Open Query we’re not a fan of migrations – it doesn’t matter from what brand to what brand, migrations tend to be expensive and painful.  Any application tends to be more suited to a particular brand – because of design and implementation choices. This is neither good nor bad, it’s just a fact that has to be acknowledged when considering these things.

Similarly, infrastructure (what hardware there is and how it’s set up and connected) tends to be dependent on the brand choice, as different databases have different needs in that space, …

[Read more]
Web Security: SHA1 SSL Deprecated

You may not be aware that the mechanism used to fingerprint the SSL certificates that  keep your access to websites encrypted and secure is changing. The old method, known as SHA1 is being deprecated – meaning it will no longer be supported. As per January 2016 various vendors will no longer support creating certificates with SHA1, and browsers show warnings when they encounter an old SHA1 certificate. Per January 2017 browsers will reject old certificates.

The new signing method, known as SHA2, has been available for some time. Users have had a choice of signing methods up until now, but there are still many sites using old certificates out there. You may want to check the security on any SSL websites you own or run!

To ensure your users’ security and privacy, force https across your entire website, not just e-commerce or other sections. You may have noticed this move on major websites over the last …

[Read more]
Motivation to Migrate RDBMS

Companies that use a standard edition of Oracle’s database software should be aware that a rapidly approaching deadline could mean increased licensing costs.

Speaking from experience (at both MySQL AB and Open Query), typically, licensing/pricing changes such as these act as a motivator for migrations.

Migrations are a nuisance (doesn’t matter from/to what platform) and are best avoided as they’re intrinsically painful, costly and time-consuming. Smart companies know this.

When asked in generic terms, we generally recommend against migrations (even to MySQL/MariaDB) for the above-mentioned practical and business reasons. There are also technical reasons. I’ll list a …

[Read more]
Slow Query Log Rotation

Some time ago, Peter Boros at Percona wrote this post: Rotating MySQL slow logs safely. It contains good info, such as that one should use the rename method for rotation (rather than copytruncate), and then connect to mysqld and issue a FLUSH LOGS (rather than send a SIGHUP signal).

So far so good. What I do not agree with is the additional construct to prevent slow queries from being written during log rotation. The author’s rationale is that if too many items get written while the rotation is in process, this can block threads. I understand this, but let’s review what actually happens.

Indeed, if one were to do lots of writes to the slow query log in a short space of time, a write could block while waiting.

Is the risk of this occurring greater during a logrotate operation? I doubt it. A FLUSH LOGS has to …

[Read more]
Hint of the day: Warning level in Error Log to see Aborted Connections
log_warnings = 2

Yields useful information in the MariaDB or MySQL error log file (or syslog on Debian/Ubuntu) you don’t want to miss out on.

You will know about aborted connections, which are otherwise only visible through global status as Aborted_connects (lost connection before they completed authentication) and Aborted_clients (cut fully authenticated connection).

It looks like

130523 2:14:05 [Warning] Aborted connection 173629 to db: 'unconnected' user: 'someapp' host: '' (Unknown error)

You will know when, where from, and if for instance a wrong password was used you’ll see the username. Basically you’ll get as much info as the server has available at that point. Useful.


InnoDB without PRIMARY KEY

Having an InnoDB table without a PRIMARY KEY is not good. Many have known this for years, but exact opinions as to why have differed. From observation, it was clear to me that it impacted performance.

InnoDB stores its row data in the leaf nodes of the primary key B+tree structure, that means that it can’t work without… so if you don’t specify a PK, it makes one up. Seems pretty innocuous and shouldn’t actually perform any worse than an auto-inc field. Except that in reality the performance can be much much worse. Annoying. Naturally we recommend clients to always have a PK (auto-inc, a composite of foreign keys, or if need be a natural key) but production systems cannot always be quickly changed, depending on the app code adding a column is not something you can just do at the DBA level.

Recently my good friend and former colleague Jeremy Cole, who has been delving into the depths of InnoDB, asked me if I had any …

[Read more]
Serving Clients Rather than Falling Over

Dawnstar Australis (yes, nickname – but I know him personally – he speaks with knowledge and authority) updates on The Real Victims Of The Click Frenzy Fail: The Australian Consumer after his earlier post from a few months ago.

Colourful language aside, I believe he rightfully points out the failings of the organising company and the big Australian retailers. From the Open Query perspective we can just review the situation where sites fall over under load. Contrary to what they say, that’s not a cool indication of popularity. Let’s compare with the real world:

  1. Brick & Mortar store does something that turns out popular and we see a huge queue outside, people need to wait for hours. The people in the queue can chat, and overall …
[Read more]
One-way Password Crypting Flaws

I was talking with a client and the topic of password crypting came up. From my background as a C coder, I have a few criteria to regard a mechanism to be safe. In this case we’ll just discuss things from the perspective of secure storage, and validation in an application.

  1. use a digital fingerprint algorithm, not a hash or CRC. A hash is by nature lossy (generates evenly distributed duplicates) and a CRC is intended to identify bit errors in transmitted data, not compare potentially different data.
  2. Store/use all of the fingerprint, not just part (otherwise it’s lossy again).
  3. SHA1 and its siblings are not ideal for this purpose, but ok. MD5 and that family of “message digests” has been proven flawed long ago, they can be “freaked” to create a desired outcome. Thus, it is possible to …
[Read more]
What a Hosting Provider did Today

I found Dennis the Menace, he now has a job as system administrator for a hosting company. Scenario: client has a problem with a server becoming unavailable (cause unknown) and has it restarted. MySQL had some page corruption in the InnoDB tablespace.

The hosting provider, being really helpful, goes in as root and first deletes ib_logfile* then ib* in /var/lib/mysql. He later says “I am sorry if I deleted it. I thought I deleted the log only. Sorry again.”  Now this may appear nice, but people who know what they’re doing with MySQL will realise that deleting the iblogfiles actually destroys data also. MySQL of course screams loudly that while it has FRM files it can’t find the tables. No kidding!

Then, while he’s been told to not touch anything any more, and I’m trying to see if I can recover the deleted files on ext3 filesystem (yes there are tools for that), he goes in again and puts an ibdata1 file back. No, …

[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 25
10 Older Entries »