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Displaying posts with tag: ssd (reset)

How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads
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During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write buffer is, it is a disk buffer were pages are written before being written to the actual data file. Upon restart, pages in the double write buffer are rewritten to their data files if complete. This is to avoid data file corruption with half written pages. I knew it has an impact on performance, on ZFS since it is transactional I always disable it, but I never realized how important the performance

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Significant performance boost with new MariaDB page compression on FusionIO
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The MariaDB project is pleased to announce a special preview release of MariaDB 10.0.9 with significant performance gains on FusionIO devices. This is is a beta-quality preview release.

Download MariaDB 10.0.9-FusionIO preview

Background

The latest work between MariaDB and FusionIO has focused on dramatically improving performance of MariaDB on the high-end SSD drives produced by Fusion-IO and at the same time delivering much better endurance for the drives themselves. Furthermore, FusionIO flash memory solutions increase transactional database performance. MariaDB includes specialized improvements for FusionIO devices, leveraging a feature of the NVMFS filesystem on these popular, high performance solid state disks. Using this feature, MariaDB 10 can

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Luxbet, MariaDB and Melbourne Cup
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Yesterday was Melbourne Cup day in Australia – the biggest annual horse race event in the country, and in the state of Victoria it’s even a public holiday.

Open Query does work for Luxbet (part of Tabcorp), and Melbourne Cup day is by far their biggest day of the year in terms of traffic. It’s not just a big spike, there’s orders of magnitude difference so you can really say that the rest of the year is downright quiet (in relative terms). So, a very interesting load pattern.

Since last year Luxbet has upgraded from stock MySQL to MariaDB, and with our input made some other infrastructure modifications including moving to a pure solid state storage (FusionIO) solution as a SAN just won’t deliver the resilience and performance required. This

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After 10 Years, MySQL Still the Right Choice for ScienceLogic's "Best Network Monitoring System on the Planet"
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ScienceLogic has a pretty fantastic network monitoring appliance.  So good in fact that InfoWorld gave it their "2013 Best Network Monitoring System on the Planet" award.  Inside their "ultraflexible, ultrascalable, carrier-grade" enterprise appliance, ScienceLogic relies on MySQL and has since their start in 2003.  Check out some of the things they've been able to do with MySQL and their reasons for continuing to use MySQL in these highlights from our new MySQL ScienceLogic case study (http://www.mysql.com/why-mysql/case-studies/mysql-best-for-sciencelogic.html).
  • Science Logic's larger customers use their appliance to monitor and manage  20,000+ devices, each of which generates a steady stream of data and

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Considering TokuDB as an engine for timeseries data
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I am working on a customer’s system where the requirement is to store a lot of timeseries data from different sensors.

For performance reasons we are going to use SSD, and therefore there is a list of requirements for the architecture:

  • Provide high insertion rate
  • Provide a good compression rate to store more data on expensive SSDs
  • Engine should be SSD friendly (less writes per timeperiod to help with SSD wear)
  • Provide a reasonable response time (within ~50 ms) on SELECT queries on hot recently inserted data

Looking on these requirements I actually think that TokuDB might be a good fit for this task.

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Virident vCache vs. FlashCache: Part 1
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(This is part one of a two part series) Over the past few weeks I have been looking at a preview release of Virident’s vCache software, which is a kernel module and set of utilities designed to provide functionality similar to that of FlashCache. In particular, Virident engaged Percona to do a usability and feature-set comparison between vCache and FlashCache and also to conduct some benchmarks for the use case where the MySQL working set is significantly larger than the InnoDB buffer pool (thus leading to a lot of buffer pool disk reads) but still small enough to fit into the cache device. In this post and the next, I’ll present some of those

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Some LSI 9211-8i issues on Windows and Linux
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tl;dr:
Make sure you flash an LSI-9211 to IT firmware rev#14 to get it to work 
with Linux and SSD trim.  You may have to downgrade from newer firmware
to older firmware to get the card to work.


Finding a SATA III controller with more than one PCI-e lane
After a recent hardware issue I decided to upgrade my computer to use new Intel 520 120MB SSD drives in RAID for improved performance.  The motherboard I use (an ASUS Rampage III extreme) has a Marvel SATA III controller with two ports, but I discovered that it is connected via only a single PCI-e lane (each lane can do at most 400MB/sec*).  This means that it can't effectively support even a single Intel 520 because one device can saturate the SATA III bus (An Intel 520 is rated at up to 550MB/sec sequential write).

So I went on a quest for a new SATA 3 controller.   To




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Storage caching options in Linux 3.9 kernel
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dm-cache is (albeit still classified “experimental”) is in the just released Linux 3.9 kernel. It deals with generic block devices and uses the device mapper framework. While there have been a few other similar tools flying around, since this one has been adopted into the kernel it looks like this will be the one that you’ll be seeing the most in to the future. It saves sysadmins the hassle of compiling extra stuff for a system.

A typical use is for an SSD to cache a HDD. Similar to a battery backed RAID controller, the objective is to insulate the application from latency caused by the mechanical device, the most laggy part of which is seek time (measured in milliseconds). Giventhe  relatively high storage capacity of an SSD (in the hundreds of GBs), this allows you to mostly disregard the mechanical latency for writes and that’s very useful for

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MariaDB Introduces Atomic Writes
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Sysbench OLTP, transactions per second

When dealing with high performance, low latency storage devices, such as SSD cards, one finds bottlenecks in new places. This is a story about such a bottle neck and how to work around it.

One unique feature of InnoDB is the double write buffer. This buffer was implemented to recover from half-written pages. This can happen in case of a power failure while InnoDB is writing a page (16KB = 32 sectors) to disk. On reading that page, InnoDB would be able to discover the corruption from the mismatch of the page checksum. However in order to recover, an intact copy of the page would be needed.

The double write buffer provides such a copy. Whenever InnoDB flushes a page to disk, it is first written to the double write buffer. Only when the buffer is

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Testing the Micron P320h
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The Micron P320h SSD is an SLC-based PCIe solid-state storage device which claims to provide the highest read throughput of any server-grade SSD, and at Micron’s request, I recently took some time to put the card through its paces, and the numbers are indeed quite impressive.

For reference, the benchmarks for this device were performed primarily on a Dell R720 with 192GB of RAM and two Xeon E5-2660 processors that yield a total of 32 virtual cores. This is the same machine which was used in my previous benchmark run. A small handful of additional tests were also performed using the Cisco UCS C250. The operating system in use was CentOS 6.3, and for the sysbench fileIO tests, the EXT4 filesystem was used. The card itself is the 700GB model.

So let’s take

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Showing entries 1 to 10 of 68 10 Older Entries

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