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Displaying posts with tag: ssd (reset)
Don’t Spin Your Data, Use SSDs!

This blog post discussed the advantages of SSDs over HDDs for database environments.

For years now, I’ve been telling audiences for my MySQL Performance talk the following: if you are running an I/O-intensive database on spinning disks you’re doing it wrong. But there are still a surprising number of laggards who aren’t embracing SSD storage (whether it’s for cost or reliability reasons).

Let’s look at cost first. As I write this now (September 2016), high-performance server-grade spinning hard drives run for about $240 for 600GB (or $0.40 per GB).  Of course, you can get an 8TB archive drive at about same price …

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Small innodb_page_size as a performance boost for SSD

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how a small innodb_page_size can create a performance boost for SSD.

In my previous post Testing Samsung storage in tpcc-mysql benchmark of Percona Server I compared different Samsung devices. Most solid state drives (SSDs) use 4KiB as an internal page size, and the InnoDB default page size is 16KiB. I wondered how using a different innodb_page_size might affect the overall performance.

Fortunately, MySQL 5.7 comes with the option innodb_page_size, so you can set different InnoDB page sizes than the standard 16KiB. This option is still quite inconvenient to use, however. You can’t change innodb_page_size for the existing database. Instead, you need to create a brand new database with a …

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Application data caching using SSDs

The Moneta project: Next generation EVCache for better cost optimizationWith the global expansion of Netflix earlier this year came the global expansion of data. After the Active-Active project and now with the N+1 architecture, the latest personalization data needs to be everywhere at all times to serve any member from any region. Caching plays a critical role in the persistence story for member personalization as detailed in this earlier blog post.

There are two primary components to the Netflix architecture. The first is the control plane that runs on the AWS cloud for generic, scalable …

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Using Persistent Memory in RDBMS

People at Intel started the pmem library project some time ago, it’s open to the broader community at GitHub and  other developers, including Linux kernel devs, are actively involved.

While the library does allow interaction with an SSD using a good-old-filesystem, we know that addressing SSD through SATA or SAS is very inefficient. That said, the type of storage architecture that SSD uses does require significant management for write levelling and verifying so that the device as a whole actually lasts, and your data is kept safe: in theory you could write to an NVRAM chip, and not know when it didn’t actually store your data properly.

But there are other technologies, such as Memristor (RRAM) and Phase Change Memory

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MySQL 5.6 Benchmarks with Haswell CPUs, SSDs and PCIe Flash


The purpose of this test is to benchmark MySQL 5.6 performance on hardware with Haswell CPUs, SSDs and PCIe Flash storage devices.



  • SysBench OLTP workload installed on the database machine
  • MySQL 5.6.24 distribution from Percona
  • jemalloc used for MySQL Server and Sysbench test client
  • Charts are plotted using MySQL Performance Analyzer


  • Data and software on server was wiped out post every test run.
  • Predefined number of tables - 16 or 64
  • Predefined size of rows - 20M per table

Read Only
Read Write
Concurrencies vary from 1 to 512 with incremental increase

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Did MySQL & Mongo have a beautiful baby called Aurora?

Amazon recently announced RDS Aurora a new addition to their database as a service offerings. Here’s Mark Callaghan’s take on what’s happening under the hood and thoughts from Fusheng Han. Amazon is uniquely positioned with RDS to take on offerings like Clustrix. So it’s definitely worth reading Dave Anselmi’s take on Aurora. Join 28,000 others […]

Hard Drive Reliability

Cloud service provider Backblaze has updated its earlier study of hard drive failure rates (Nov 2013) in its own infrastructure – from 27,000 to more than 34,000 drives, and the new report (Sep 2014) is quite informative. Hitachi comes out pretty high, Western Digital has produced some good drives, but Seagate tends to come out worst. Each brand does have good and not-so-good models so there’s no single right answer, and for any new model you’ll always be dealing with an unknown factor.

Backblaze also found that consumer drives actually perform well compared to enterprise grade drives, and once price is taking into account the enterprise drives just …

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How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write buffer is, it is a disk buffer were pages are written before being written to the actual data file. Upon restart, pages in the double write buffer are rewritten to their data files if complete. This is to avoid data file corruption with half written pages. I knew it has an impact on performance, on ZFS since it is transactional I always disable it, but I never realized how important the performance impact could be. Back from PLMCE, a friend had dropped home a Dell R320 server, asking …

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Significant performance boost with new MariaDB page compression on FusionIO

The MariaDB project is pleased to announce a special preview release of MariaDB 10.0.9 with significant performance gains on FusionIO devices. This is is a beta-quality preview release.

Download MariaDB 10.0.9-FusionIO preview


The latest work between MariaDB and FusionIO has focused on dramatically improving performance of MariaDB on the high-end SSD drives produced by Fusion-IO and at the same time delivering much better endurance for the drives themselves. Furthermore, FusionIO flash memory solutions increase transactional database performance. MariaDB includes specialized improvements for FusionIO devices, leveraging a feature of the NVMFS filesystem on these popular, high performance solid state disks. Using this feature, MariaDB 10 can eliminate some of the overhead within the InnoDB storage engine …

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Luxbet, MariaDB and Melbourne Cup

Yesterday was Melbourne Cup day in Australia – the biggest annual horse race event in the country, and in the state of Victoria it’s even a public holiday.

Open Query does work for Luxbet (part of Tabcorp), and Melbourne Cup day is by far their biggest day of the year in terms of traffic. It’s not just a big spike, there’s orders of magnitude difference so you can really say that the rest of the year is downright quiet (in relative terms). So, a very interesting load pattern.

Since last year Luxbet has upgraded from stock MySQL to MariaDB, and with our input made some other infrastructure modifications including moving to a pure solid state storage (FusionIO) solution as a SAN just won’t deliver the resilience and performance required. This may seem odd, but remember that a) …

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