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Displaying posts with tag: Hardware and Storage (reset)
Using Ceph with MySQL

Over the last year, the Ceph world drew me in. Partly because of my taste for distributed systems, but also because I think Ceph represents a great opportunity for MySQL specifically and databases in general. The shift from local storage to distributed storage is similar to the shift from bare disks host configuration to LVM-managed disks configuration.

Most of the work I’ve done with Ceph was in collaboration with folks from Red Hat (mainly Brent Compton and Kyle Bader). This work resulted in a number of talks presented at the Percona Live conference in April and the Red Hat Summit San Francisco at the end of June. I could write a lot about using Ceph with databases, and I hope this post …

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Smallest MySQL Server in the World (under $60) which can even make you toast while fixing MySQL bug #2

In my last blog post, Internet of Things, Messaging and MySQL, I have showed how to start your own Internet of Things with Particle Photon board. That implementation is great, but requires constant internet (wi-fi) access as the Particle Photon board does not have any local storage. If you do not have a reliable network access (i.e. in some remote places) or need something really small to store your data you can now use Intel Edison. I’ve even install MySQL on Edison, which makes it the smallest (in size) MySQL server in the world! Other options include:

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The Q&A: Creating best-in-class backup solutions for your MySQL environment

Thank you for attending my July 15 webinar, “Creating Best in Class Backup solutions for your MySQL environment.” Due to the amount of content we discussed and some minor technical difficulties faced near the end of webinar we have decided to cover the final two slides of the presentation along with the questions asked by attendees during the webinar via this blog post.

The slides are available for download. And you can watch the webinar in it’s entirety here.

The final two slides were about our tips for having a …

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Update on the InnoDB double-write buffer and EXT4 transactions

In a post, written a few months ago, I found that using EXT4 transactions with the “data=journal” mount option, improves the write performance significantly, by 55%, without putting data at risk. Many people commented on the post mentioning they were not able to reproduce the results and thus, I decided to further investigate in order to find out why my results were different.

So, I ran sysbench benchmarks on a few servers and found when the InnoDB double-write buffer limitations occur and when they don’t. I also made sure some of my colleagues were able to reproduce the results. Basically, in order to reproduce the results you need the following conditions:

  • Spinning disk (no SSD)
  • Enough CPU power
  • A dataset that fits in the InnoDB buffer pool
  • A continuous high write …
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How to improve InnoDB performance by 55% for write-bound loads

During April’s Percona Live MySQL Conference and Expo 2014, I attended a talk on MySQL 5.7 performance an scalability given by Dimitri Kravtchuk, the Oracle MySQL benchmark specialist. He mentioned at some point that the InnoDB double write buffer was a real performance killer. For the ones that don’t know what the innodb double write buffer is, it is a disk buffer were pages are written before being written to the actual data file. Upon restart, pages in the double write buffer are rewritten to their data files if complete. This is to avoid data file corruption with half written pages. I knew it has an impact on performance, on ZFS since it is transactional I always disable it, but I never realized how important the performance impact could be. Back from PLMCE, a friend had dropped home a Dell R320 server, asking …

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Percona Live London 2013: an insider’s view of the schedule

With the close of call for papers earlier this month, the Percona Live London conference committee was in full swing this past week reviewing all of the many submissions for November’s Percona Live London MySQL Conference.

The submissions are far ranging and cover some really interesting topics, making the lineup for Percona Live London really strong! What the committee looks for in a submission is how much “value” a talk will bring to the conference – this is to say it needs to be far more that a product demo. As such, real-world experiences are receiving much more favorable reviews, along with talks that cover methodologies the attendees will …

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Let’s talk about Percona Server 5.6: Enterprise Grade MySQL (webinar)

The new Percona Server 5.6 is the most manageable, highest performance, and most scalable version of MySQL available. Percona Server 5.6 is the best open source MySQL choice for enterprise-grade applications because it combines new features with the best features of Percona Server 5.5 and MySQL 5.6 to provide unparalleled performance.

Join me tomorrow as I explain how Percona Server 5.6 takes MySQL performance to new heights. In this webinar, aptly titled “Percona Server 5.6: Enterprise Grade MySQL,” I’ll compare Percona Server 5.6 to …

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LVM read performance during snapshots

For the same customer I am exploring ZFS for backups, the twin server is using regular LVM and XFS. On this twin, I have setup mylvmbackup for a more conservative backup approach. I quickly found some odd behaviors, the backup was taking much longer than what I was expecting. It is not the first time I saw that, but here it was obvious. So I recorded some metrics, bi from vmstat and percent of cow space used from lvs during a backup. Cow space is the Copy On Write buffer used by LVM to record the modified pages like they were at the beginning of the snapshot. Upon reads, LVM must scan the list to verify that there’s no newer version. Here’s the other details about the backup:

  • Filesystem: 2TB, xfs
  • Snapsize: 60GB
  • Amount to backup: ~600GB
  • Backup tool: mylvmbackup
  • Compressor: pbzip2

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ZFS on Linux and MySQL

I am currently working with a large customer and I am involved with servers located in two data centers, one with Solaris servers and the other one with Linux servers. The Solaris side is cleverly setup using zones and ZFS and this provides a very low virtualization overhead. I learned quite a lot about these technologies while looking at this, thanks to Corey Mosher.

On the Linux side, we recently deployed a pair on servers for backup purpose, boxes with 64 300GB SAS drives, 3 raid controllers and 192GB of RAM. These servers will run a few slave instances each of production database servers and will perform the backups.  The write load is not excessive so a single server can easily handle the write load of all the MySQL instances.  The original idea was to configure them with raid-10 + LVM, making sure to …

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Virident vCache vs. FlashCache: Part 2

This is the second part in a two-part series comparing Virident’s vCache to FlashCache. The first part was focused on usability and feature comparison; in this post, we’ll look at some sysbench test results.

Disclosure: The research and testing conducted for this post were sponsored by Virident.

First, some background information. All tests were conducted on Percona’s Cisco UCS C250 test machine, and both the vCache and FlashCache tests used the same 2.2TB Virident FlashMAX II as the cache storage device. EXT4 is the filesystem, and CentOS 6.4 the operating system, although the pre-release modules I received from Virident required the use of the CentOS 6.2 kernel, 2.6.32-220, so that was the kernel in use for all of the benchmarks on both systems. The benchmark tool used was sysbench 0.5 and the version of MySQL used was …

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