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Displaying posts with tag: datatypes (reset)
MySQL 8.0: Kana-sensitive collation for Japanese

In my previous post, I wrote about the new Japanese collation for utf8mb4 introduced in MySQL 8.0.1! This collation (utf8mb4_ja_0900_as_cs) implements accent / case sensitivity for Japanese as defined by CLDR 30.

Today, I am writing about our new utf8mb4_ja_0900_as_cs_ks collation which includes support for kana sensitivity.…

Debugging Character Set Issues by Example

In a world moving towards Unicode and UTF-8, a lot of applications still use some one-byte character set. And since one-byte characters usually accepts any byte in the range 0x00-0xFF it often works well to store and retrieve any data in such character strings, e.g.…

MySQL 8.0: When to use utf8mb3 over utf8mb4?

Long time MySQL users will recognize that there are two varieties of utf8 support in MySQL; utf8mb3 and utf8mb4.  Let me dig a little bit deeper in explaining the history between the two:

  • MySQL 4.1 (2004) was the first version to support character sets and collations.

MySQL 8.0 Collations: Migrating from older collations

From MySQL 8.0, utf8mb4 is the default character set, and the default collation for utf8mb4 is utf8mb4_0900_ai_ci. MySQL 8.0 is also coming with a whole new set of Unicode collations for the utf8mb4 character set.

This will allow use of the complete Unicode 9.0.0 character set in MySQL, and for new applications this is great news.…

MySQL 8.0.1: Accent and case sensitive collations for utf8mb4

In MySQL 8.0 we have been working to improve our support for utf8 as we make the transition to switch it to the default character set.  For more details see our earlier posts:

In today’s post I wanted to describe the improvements to support accent and case sensitive collations.…

New collations in MySQL 8.0.0

Since MySQL 5.5, MySQL has supported the utf8mb4 character set.  With the character-set defining the repertoire of characters that can be stored (utf8mb4 can present Unicode characters from U+0000 to U+10FFFF), a collation defines how sorting order and comparisons should behave.…

Upgrading JSON data stored in TEXT columns

One of the more frequently asked questions with MySQL 5.7 is “How can I upgrade my JSON data from using TEXT in an earlier version of MySQL to use the native JSON data type?”. Today I wanted to show an example of how to do so, using sample data from SF OpenData.…

Storing UUID Values in MySQL Tables

After seeing that several blogs discuss storage of UUID values into MySQL, and that this topic is recurrent on forums, I thought I would compile some sensible ideas I have seen, and also add a couple new ones.

Different techniques

Say we have a table of users, and each user has a UUID.…

Getting Started With MySQL & JSON on Windows

MySQL is getting native support for JSON.  This blog post will show you how to quickly get the MySQL server with these new features running on your Windows rig and how to write a small C# program in Visual Studio 2015 that stores a JSON document using the new native JSON data type.

Schema or Schemaless

The upcoming 5.7 version of MySQL introduces a ton of new features, some of which I am quite excited about—in particular the …

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How to Easily Identify Tables With Temporal Types in Old Format!

The MySQL 5.6.4 release introduced support for fractional values within the temporal datatypes: TIME, DATETIME, and TIMESTAMP. Hence the storage requirement and encoding differs for them in comparison to older (5.5 and earlier) temporal datatypes. The storage format for the temporal datatypes in the old format are not space efficient either, and recreating tables having both the new and old formats can be a long and tedious process. For these reasons, we wanted to make it easier for users to identify precisely which tables, if any, need to be upgraded.

In my previous blog post, where we looked at the process of upgrading old MySQL-5.5 format temporals to the MySQL-5.6 format, there was the …

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