Showing entries 1 to 10 of 27
10 Older Entries »
Displaying posts with tag: orchestrator (reset)
Orchestrator and ProxySQL

In this blog post, I am going to show you how can you use Orchestrator and ProxySQL together.

In my previous blog post, I showed how to use bash scripts and move virtual IPs with Orchestrator. As in that post, I assume you already have Orchestrator working. If not, you can find the installation steps here.

In the case of a failover, Orchestrator changes the MySQL topology and promotes a new master. But who lets the application know about this change? This is where ProxySQL helps us.

ProxySQL

You can find the ProxySQL install steps  …

[Read more]
Orchestrator: Moving VIPs During Failover

In this post, I’ll discuss how to moving VIPs during a failover using Orchestrator.

In our previous post, we showed you how Orchestrator works. In this post, I am going to give you a proof-of-concept on how Orchestrator can move VIPs in case of failover. For this post, I’m assuming the Orchestrator is already installed and able to manage the topology.

Hooks

Orchestrator is a topology manager. Nothing less nothing more. In the case of failover, it will reorganize the topology, promote a new master and connect the slaves to it. But it won’t do any DNS changes, and it won’t move VIPs (or anything else).

However, Orchestrator supports hooks. Hooks are external scripts …

[Read more]
How We Made MySQL Great Again, or Upgrading MySQL with Orchestrator

In this blog post, we’ll discuss upgrading MySQL with Orchestrator.

I recently had a client, Life360, that wanted to upgrade from Percona Server 5.5 to Percona Server 5.6, and implement GTID in their high transaction environment. They had co-masters and multiple read slaves.

Orchestrator made this job much easier for us. My colleague, Tibi, recently posted about Orchestrator here and here.

Daniel from Life360 saw Orchestrator and was very interested. So here is how he setup Orchestrator in his own words:

[Read more]
Orchestrator-agent: How to recover a MySQL database

In our previous post, we showed how Orchestrator can handle complex replication topologies. Today we will discuss how the Orchestrator-agent complements Orchestrator by monitoring our servers, and provides us a snapshot and recovery abilities if there are problems.

Please be aware that the following scripts and settings in this post are not production ready (missing error handling, etc.) –  this post is just a proof of concept.

What is Orchestrator-agent?

Orchestrator-agent is a sub-project of Orchestrator. It is a service that runs on the MySQL servers, and it gives us …

[Read more]
Orchestrator: MySQL Replication Topology Manager

This blog post discusses Orchestrator: MySQL Replication Topology Manager.

What is Orchestrator?

Orchestrator is a replication topology manager for MySQL.

It has many great features:

  • The topology and status of the replication tree is automatically detected and monitored
  • Either a GUI, CLI or API can be used to check the status and perform operations
  • Supports automatic failover of the master, and the replication tree can be fixed when servers in the tree fail – either manually or automatically
  • It is not dependent on any specific version or flavor of MySQL (MySQL, Percona Server, MariaDB or even MaxScale binlog servers)
  • Orchestrator supports many different types of topologies, from a single …
[Read more]
State of automated recovery via Pseudo-GTID & Orchestrator @ Booking.com

This post sums up some of my work on MySQL resilience and high availability at Booking.com by presenting the current state of automated master and intermediate master recoveries via Pseudo-GTID & Orchestrator.

Booking.com uses many different MySQL topologies, of varying vendors, configurations and workloads: Oracle MySQL, MariaDB, statement based replication, row based replication, hybrid, OLTP, OLAP, GTID (few), no GTID (most), Binlog Servers, filters, hybrid of all the above.

Topologies size varies from a single server to many-many-many. Our typical topology has a master in one datacenter, a bunch of slaves in same DC, a slave in another DC acting as an …

[Read more]
Orchestrator & Pseudo-GTID for binlog reader failover

One of our internal apps at Booking.com audits changes to our tables on various clusters. We used to use tungsten replicator, but have since migrated onto our own solution.

We have a binlog reader (uses open-replicator) running on a slave. It expects Row Based Replication, hence our slave runs with log-slave-updates, binlog-format='ROW', to translate from the master's Statement Based Replication. The binlog reader reads what it needs to read, audits what it needs to audit, and we're happy.

However what happens if that slave dies?

In such case we need to be able to point our binlog reader to another slave, and it needs to be able to pick up auditing from the same point.

This sounds an awful lot like slave repointing in case of master/intermediate master failure, and …

[Read more]
Thoughts on MaxScale automated failover (and Orchestrator)

Having attended a talk (as part of the MariaDB Developer Meeting in Amsterdam) about recent developments of MaxScale in executing automated failovers, here are some (late) observations of mine.

I will begin by noting that the project is stated to be pre-production, and so of course none of the below are complaints, but rather food for thought, points for action and otherwise recommendations.

Some functionality of the MaxScale failover is also implemented by orchestrator, which I author. Orchestrator was built in production environments by and for operational people. In this respect it has gained many insights and had to cope with many real-world cases, special cases …

[Read more]
Speaking at Percona Live Amsterdam: Orchestrator

In a week's time I'll be speaking at Percona Live Amsterdam. I will be presenting:

Managing and Visualizing your replication topologies with Orchestrator
23 September 4:20PM

This talk will present orchestrator, on which I've been working for the last year and a half, originally at Outbrain and now at Booking.com.

I …

[Read more]
Orchestrator visual cheatsheet, TL;DR the "smart" way

Orchestrator is really growing. And the amount of users (DBAs, sys admins) using it is growing. Which gives me a lot of immediate feedback in the form of "Look, there's just too many options to move slaves around! Which ones should we use?"

TL;DR look at the two visualized commands below

They are enough

The "smart" commands to end all commands

So all relocation commands are important, and give you fine-grained, pin-pointed control of the method of topology refactoring. However, most of the time you just want to move those servers around. Which is why there's a new "smart" mode which support these two commands, which you should be happy using:

  • relocate: move a single slave to another position
  • relocate-slaves: move …
[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 10 of 27
10 Older Entries »