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Displaying posts with tag: Percona (reset)
Update the Signing Key for Percona Debian and Ubuntu Packages

In this blog post, we’ll explain how to update the signing key for Percona Debian and Ubuntu packages.

Some of the users might have already noticed following warning on Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus):

W: Signature by key 430BDF5C56E7C94E848EE60C1C4CBDCDCD2EFD2A uses weak digest algorithm (SHA1)

when running apt-get update.

Percona .deb packages are signed with a key that uses an algorithm now considered weak. Starting with the next release, Debian and Ubuntu packages are signed with a new key that uses the much stronger SHA-512 algorithm. All future package release will also contain the new algorithm.

You’ll need to do one of the …

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Speaking in October 2016
  • I’m thrilled to naturally be at Percona Live Europe Amsterdam from Oct 3-5 2016. I have previously talked about some of my sessions but I think there’s another one on the schedule already.
  • LinuxCon Europe – Oct 4-6 2016. I won’t be there for the whole conference, but hope to make the most of my day on Oct 6th.
  • MariaDB Developer’s meeting – Oct 6-8 2016 – skipping the first day, but will be there all day 2 and 3. I even have a session on day 3, focused on compatibility with MySQL, a topic I deeply care about ( …
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PerconaLive Amsterdam 2016 - Talks and shows

With Oracle Open World behind us, we are now getting ready for the next big event, i.e. the European edition of PerconaLive. I am going to be a presenter three times:

  • MySQL operations in Docker is a three-hour tutorial, and it will be an expansion of the talk by the same title presented at OOW. Attendees who want to play along can do it, by coming prepared with Docker 1.11 or later and the following images already pulled (images with [+] are mandatory, while [-] are optional):

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Speaking in September 2016

A few events, but mostly circling around London:

  • Open collaboration – an O’Reilly Online Conference, at 10am PT, Tuesday September 13 2016 – I’m going to be giving a new talk titled Forking Successfully. I’ve seen how the platform works, and I’m looking forward to trying this method out (its like a webminar but not quite!)
  • September MySQL London Meetup – I’m going to focus on MySQL, a branch, Percona Server and the fork MariaDB Server. This will be interesting because one of the reasons you don’t see a huge Emacs/XEmacs push after about 20 years? Feature parity. And the work that’s going into MySQL 8.0 is mighty interesting.
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Fun with Bugs #45 - On Some Bugs Fixed in MySQL 5.7.15

Oracle released MySQL 5.7.15 recently, earlier than expected. The reason for this "unexpected" release is not clear to me, but it could happen because of a couple of security related internal bug reports that got fixed:

  • "It was possible to write log files ending with .ini or .cnf that later could be parsed as option files. The general query log and slow query log can no longer be written to a file ending with .ini or .cnf. (Bug #24388753)
  • Privilege escalation was possible by exploiting the way REPAIR TABLE used temporary files. (Bug #24388746)"

Let me concentrate on the most important fixes to bugs and problems reported by Community users. …

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Speaking at Percona Live Europe Amsterdam

I’m happy to speak at Percona Live Europe Amsterdam 2016 again this year (just look at the awesome schedule). On my agenda:

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Top Most Overlooked MySQL Performance Optimizations: Q & A

Thank you for attending my 22nd July 2016 webinar titled “Top Most Overlooked MySQL Performance Optimizations“. In this blog, I will provide answers to the Q & A for that webinar.

For hardware, which disk raid level do you suggest? Is raid5 suggested performance-wise and data-integrity-wise?
RAID 5 comes with high overhead, as each write turns into a sequence of four physical I/O operations, two reads and two writes. We know that RAID 5s have some write penalty, and it could affect the performance on spindle disks. In most cases, we advise using alternative RAID levels. Use RAID 5 when disk capacity is more important than performance (e.g., archive databases …

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Basically Shitty License

Monty announced that he has created a new non-open source license called the "Business Source License" or BSL.  I think it should have a different name...

You see, Monty has fundamentally crafted a straw man to stand in for the general Open Source model by applying his experience in the dog-eat-dog world of forked software, in particular, the "ecosystem" of MySQL.  The software that MariaDB draws the majority of their income from is MariaDB, which is a fork of MySQL.  If you don't know the history, well, you see, SUN bought MySQL, Oracle bought Sun, and Monty, in an environment of nearly Biblical levels of FUD, forked MySQL into MariaDB (both products are named after his daughters).

While MariaDB was originally envisioned as a "drop in/drop out" replacement, it has diverged so far from the Oracle product that it is no longer even "drop in" with the latest versions of MySQL. Oracle is adding amazing new …

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What’s next

I received an overwhelming number of comments when I said I was leaving MariaDB Corporation. Thank you – it is really nice to be appreciated.

I haven’t left the MySQL ecosystem. In fact, I’ve joined Percona as their Chief Evangelist in the CTO Office, and I’m going to focus on the MySQL/Percona Server/MariaDB Server ecosystem, while also looking at MongoDB and other solutions that are good for Percona customers. Thanks again for the overwhelming response on the various social media channels, and via emails, calls, etc.

Here’s to a great time at Percona to focus on open source databases and solutions around them!

My first blog post on the Percona blog – I’m Colin Charles, and I’m here to evangelize …

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Webinar Thursday 8/11 at 10 am: InnoDB Troubleshooting

Join Sveta Smirnova Thursday, August 11 at 10 am PDT (UTC-7) for a webinar on InnoDB Troubleshooting.

InnoDB is one of the most popular database engines. This general-purpose storage engine is widely used, has been MySQL’s default engine since version 5.6, and holds MySQL system tables since 5.7. It is hard to find a MySQL installation that doesn’t have at least one InnoDB table.

InnoDB is not a simple engine. It has its own locks, transactions, log files, monitoring, options and more. It is also under active development. Some of the latest features introduced in 5.6 are read-only transactions and multiple buffer pools (which now can persist on the disk between restarts). In 5.7, InnoDB …

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