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Displaying posts with tag: oltp (reset)
MariaDB 10.1 and MySQL 5.7 performance on commodity hardware

When you have read my previous blog post about MariaDB 10.1 GA performance, you have probably wondered why I didn’t include any numbers for MySQL 5.7. There are two reasons: first MySQL wasn’t GA at that time and secondly MySQL is not running stable on Power8. Today I will come up with a comparison benchmark. […]

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MariaDB 10.1 can do 1 million queries per second

MariaDB 10.1 not only contains tons of new features, it has also been polished to deliver top performance. The biggest improvement has been achieved for scalability on massively multithreaded hardware.

The following numbers show the throughput for a simplified sysbench OLTP benchmark on MariaDB-10.1.8 compared to MariaDB-10.0.21:

OLTP clients MariaDB-10.0.21 MariaDB-10.1.8 increase
160 398124 930778 135%
200 397102 1024311 159%
240 395661 1108756 181%
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Log Buffer #431: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

This Log buffer edition covers Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL blog posts about new features, tips, tricks and best practices.


  • Traditionally, assigning specific processes to a certain set of CPUs has been done by using processor sets (and resource pools). This is quite useful, but it requires the hard partitioning of processors in the system. That means, we can’t restrict process A to run on CPUs 1,2,3 and process B to run on CPUs 3,4,5, because these partitions overlap.
  • Parallel_Degree_Limit, Parallel_Max_Degree, Maximum DOP? Confused?
  • JDeveloper 12c – …
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Using Lua-enabled sysbench

A quite common benchmark for MySQL is sysbench. It was written nearly 10 years ago by Alexey Kopytov.

Sysbench has modes to benchmark raw CPU performance, mutex speed, scheduler overhead and file IO performance. The probably most often used sysbench mode is OLTP. This benchmark mimics a OLTP scenario with small transactions hitting an optimized database. There are many variables to play with, most important is the number of simulated application threads (option --num-threads). The OLTP benchmark can be run read-only, then it does 14 SELECT queries per transaction. Or it can be run read-write which adds 2 UPDATEs and one INSERT and DELETE.

The latest release of this official sysbench tree is 0.4.12. Many Linux distributions ship a package for this.

However there is also a newer version of sysbench, that comes as version number 0.5.

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Scale Up, Partitioning, Scale Out

On the 8/16 I conducted a webinar titled: "Scale Up vs. Scale Out" (

ScaleBase Webinar 8.16: ScaleUp vs. ScaleOut from ScaleBase
The webinar was successful, we had many attendees and great participation in questions and answers throughout the session and in the end. Only after the webinar it only occurred to me that one specific graphic was missing from the webinar deck. It was occurred to me after answering several audience questions about "the difference between …

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ARM based data center. Inspiring.

In a previous post I wrote ARM based servers. Since then, and thanks to all the comments and responses I got, I looked more into this ARM thing and it's absolutely fascinating...

Look at this beauty (taken from the site of Calxeda, the manufacturer):

What is it? A chip? A server? No, it's a cluster of 4 servers...

And this:

is HP Redstone Server, 288 chips, 1,152 cores (Calxeda quad-core SoC) in a 4U server “Dramatically reducing the cost and complexity of cabling and …

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The catch-22 of read/write splitting

In my previous post I covered the shard-disk paradigm's pros and cons, but the conclusion that is that it cannot really qualify as a scale-out solution, when it comes to massive OLTP, big-data, big-sessions-count and mixture of reads and writes.

Read/Write splitting is achieved when numerous replicated database servers are used for reads. This way the system can scale to cope with increase in concurrent load. This solution qualifies as a scale-out solution as it allow expansion beyond the boundaries of one DB, DB machines are shared-nothing, can be added as a slave to the replication "group" when required.

And, as a fact, read/write …

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Why shared-storage DB clusters don't scale

Yesterday I was asked by a customer for the reason why he had failed to achieve scale with a state-of-the-art "shared-storage" cluster. "It's a scale-out to 4 servers, but with a shared disk. And I got, after tons of work and efforts, 130% throughput, not even close to the expected 400%" he said.

Well, scale-out cannot be achieved with a shared storage and the word "shared" is the key. Scale-out is done with absolutely nothing shared or a "shared-nothing" architecture. This what makes it linear and unlimited. Any shared resource, creates a tremendous burden on each and every database server in the cluster.

In a previous post, I identified database engine activities such as buffer management, locking, thread locks/semaphores, and recovery tasks - as the main bottleneck in the OLTP …

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Scale-out your DB on ARM-based servers

Today, I think we witnessed a small sign for a big revolution...
"Dell announced a prototype low-power server with ARM processors, following a growing demand by Web companies for custom-built servers that can scale performance while reducing financial overhead on data centers"In short, ARM (see Wikipedia definition here) is an architecture standard for processors. ARM processors are slower compared to good old x86 processors from Intel and AMD, but have power-efficiency, density and price attributes that intrigue customers, especially in our days of green data centers where carbon emissions is …

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Scale differences between OLTP and Analytics

In my previous post,, I reviewed the differences between OLTP and Analytics databases.

Scale challenges are different between those 2 worlds of databases.

Scale challenges in the Analytics world are with the growing amounts of data. Most solutions have been leveraging those 3 main aspects: Columnar storage, RAM and parallelism.
Columnar storage makes scans and data filtering more precise and focused. After that – it all goes down to the I/O - the faster the I/O is, the faster the query will finish and bring results. Faster disks and also SSD can play good role, but above all: RAM! …

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