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Displaying posts with tag: vcs (reset)
Log Buffer #431: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

This Log buffer edition covers Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL blog posts about new features, tips, tricks and best practices.


  • Traditionally, assigning specific processes to a certain set of CPUs has been done by using processor sets (and resource pools). This is quite useful, but it requires the hard partitioning of processors in the system. That means, we can’t restrict process A to run on CPUs 1,2,3 and process B to run on CPUs 3,4,5, because these partitions overlap.
  • Parallel_Degree_Limit, Parallel_Max_Degree, Maximum DOP? Confused?
  • JDeveloper 12c – …
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Adopting RAD in the Enterprise: The 14 Biggest Misconceptions

Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a way of developing computer software applications with less effort than the traditional means.

RAD tools focus on providing code generation and automated testing capabilities with the use of convention over configuration to provide a streamlined workflow to create applications.

Even with the most advanced and easiest to use RAD tools, there are times which the traditional enterprise and the business software development vendors which are having their own implementations and in-house built frameworks are continuously refusing to adopt them.

Most of the misconceptions on the RAD are based on FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) which has been created around the internal complexity of the RAD tools.

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InnoDB Revision History

This is a brief overview of the history of InnoDB with respect to the Version Control Systems (VCS) that were used for developing. It could be useful to people who want to trace back in time to find the origins of bugs or features.

Early days
InnoDB was born in the mid 1990s when Heikki Tuuri started developing this masterpiece. Heikki was a lone developer at that time and he did not use any VCS. There is no InnoDB revision history before 2001.

2001 – 2005
Then in 2001 InnoDB was imported into MySQL’s BitKeeper repository and development continued, recording the history there.

2005 – 2010
Later on in Oct 2005 when Oracle acquired Innobase, InnoDB developers had to move away from MySQL’s BitKeeper repository and Subversion was chosen for InnoDB development. The latest sources from BitKeeper were imported into SVN without preserving the history …

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