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Displaying posts with tag: Normalization (reset)
Normalization and smoking



An interesting question came yesterday at the end of the MySQL workshop in Athens. An user has a server with about 40,000 tables, and the performance is not brilliant (oh really?). The reason is that there is an application that requires one or more new tables for any user, and the tables are of about ten different structures.
The user asked the wrong question: "will the performance improve if I change the storage engine from InnoDB to MyISAM?"


Salle gave the first answer. Converting the tables to MyISAM would only exacerbate the problem. Instead of having one file per table, the …

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Common wrong Data Types compilation

During my work with companies using MySQL, I have encountered many issues with regard to schema design, normalization and indexing. Of the most common errors are incorrect data types definition. Many times the database is designed by programmers or otherwise non-expert DBAs. Some companies do not have the time and cannot spare the effort of redesigning and refactoring their databases, and eventually face poor performance issues.

Here’s a compilation of “the right and the wrong” data types.

  • INT(1) is not one byte long. INT(10) is no bigger than INT(2). The number in parenthesis is misleading, and only describes the text alignment of the number, when displayed in an interactive shell. All mentioned types are the same INT, have the same storage capacity, and the same range. If you want a one-byte …
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Speaking at OSCON 2008

I’ll be speaking at OSCON 2008 in Portland, delivering my Normalization Session. More details as I get them.

Speaking at the 2008 MySQL Conference & Expo

I’ve had one session accepted at the 2008 MySQL Conference & Expo (which is a good thing since I only submitted one session for nomination).

This year’s session is titled How to be Normal, a Guide for Developers. I decided to return to my old Normalization talk, but lean more towards the practical than the theoretical this year and work on common scenarios faced by developers rather than walk a person through the normal forms like I have previously done.

Here’s the abstract I’ll be sending in to replace the ugly one I submitted with:

At some point in every software project involving a database it becomes necessary for the developers who created (or inherited) the project to step back and take a look at their database. Many projects have a database schema that has evolved over time, with columns added here and tables added …

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