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Displaying posts with tag: dynomite (reset)
Netflix Data Benchmark: Benchmarking Cloud Data Stores

The Netflix member experience is offered to 83+ million global members, and delivered using thousands of microservices. These services are owned by multiple teams, each having their own build and release lifecycles, generating a variety of data that is stored in different types of data store systems. The Cloud Database Engineering (CDE) team manages those data store systems, so we run benchmarks to validate updates to these systems, perform capacity planning, and test our cloud instances with multiple workloads and under different failure scenarios. We were also interested in a tool that could evaluate and compare new data store systems as they appear in the market or in the open source domain, determine their performance characteristics and limitations, and gauge whether they could be used in production for relevant use cases. For these purposes, we wrote Netflix Data Benchmark

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Dynomite-manager: Managing Dynomite Clusters


Dynomite has been adopted widely inside Netflix due to its high performance and low latency attributes. In our recent blog, we showcased the performance of Dynomite with Redis as the underlying data storage engine. At this point (Q2 2016), there are almost 50 clusters with more than 1000 nodes, centrally managed by the Cloud Database Engineering (CDE) team. CDE team has a wide experience with other data stores, such as Cassandra, ElasticSearch and Amazon RDS.Dynomite is used at Netflix both as a:

  1. Cache, …
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Liveblogging at Confoo: Blending NoSQL and SQL

Persistence Smoothie: Blending NoSQL and SQL – see user feedback and comments at http://joind.in/talk/view/1332.

Michael Bleigh from Intridea, high-end Ruby and Ruby on Rails consultants, build apps from start to finish, making it scalable. He’s written a lot of stuff, available at http://github.com/intridea. @mbleigh on twitter

NoSQL is a new way to think about persistence. Most NoSQL systems are not ACID compliant (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability).

Generally, most NoSQL systems have:

  • Denormalization
  • Eventual Consistency
  • Schema-Free
  • Horizontal Scale

NoSQL tries to scale (more) simply, it is starting to go mainstream – NY …

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Showing entries 1 to 3