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Showing entries 1 to 17

Displaying posts with tag: graph (reset)

On Dolphins, Panda's and Bugs
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MySQL Bugs On Dolphins, Panda's and Bugs

Like any good OpenSource project the MySQL Bugs website is open for anyone to search through. This ofcourse doesn't include the security bugs.

There is a second collection of bugs in the My Oracle Support and these bugs are only accesseble by customers with a support contract. Even when I have access to MOS I still prefer to use the community bugs site. For service requests etc. I would use MOS.

The openness of the bugs database is one of the topic the IOUG MySQL Council discusses with Oracle.

The bugs database has more to offer than just information about initial bugs:

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The Data Day, A few days: January 17-22 2013
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DataStax and VoltDB launch their version 3.0s. And more

For 451 Research clients: DataStax adds security and manageability to distributed NoSQL database bit.ly/Vb1IiT

— Matt Aslett (@maslett) January 18, 2013

For 451 clients: LogiXML serves up fresh cut of BI stack with an eye to more embedded analytics deals bit.ly/SppzsH By Krishna Roy

— Matt Aslett (@maslett) January 21, 2013

Inside H-P’s Missed Chance To Avoid a Disastrous Deal – WSJ.com on.wsj.com/Td7wrh via @

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MySQL version history (updated)
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I've created a graph about the MySQL version history.

It's mysql-graph-history on github.


Please let me know if this is correct or if I'm forgetting some versions.
Find friends of friends using MySQL
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In a previous article, I've already talked about an optimized way to connect locations in a geographic point of view by using MySQL. In this manner, locations of pubs, drugstores, barbers or even users can be obtained. Communities, or perhaps I should use the newer term Social Networks, make use of the buddy network of indiviual members in addition to the geographical mapping. This has many psychological advantages, because new members can be integrated in an established network very easily and I'm more willing to become involved when I already know some of the members.

Read the rest »

Liveblogging at Confoo: Blending NoSQL and SQL
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Persistence Smoothie: Blending NoSQL and SQL – see user feedback and comments at http://joind.in/talk/view/1332.

Michael Bleigh from Intridea, high-end Ruby and Ruby on Rails consultants, build apps from start to finish, making it scalable. He’s written a lot of stuff, available at http://github.com/intridea. @mbleigh on twitter

NoSQL is a new way to think about persistence. Most NoSQL systems are not ACID compliant (Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability).

Generally, most NoSQL systems have:

  • Denormalization
  • Eventual Consistency
  • Schema-Free
  • Horizontal Scale

NoSQL tries to scale (more) simply, it is starting to go







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OpenSQLCamp Videos online!
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OpenSQLCamp was a huge success! I took videos of most of the sessions (we only had 3 video cameras, and 4 rooms, and 2 sessions were not recorded). Unfortunately, I was busy doing administrative stuff for opensqlcamp for the opening keynote and first 15 minutes of the session organizing, and when I got to the planning board, it was already full….so I was not able to give a session.

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OpenSQLCamp Lightning Talk Videos
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OpenSQLCamp was a huge success! Not many folks have blogged about what they learned there….if you missed it, all is not lost. We did take videos of most of the sessions (we only had 3 video cameras, and 4 rooms, and 2 sessions were not recorded).

All the videos have been processed, and I am working on uploading them to YouTube and filling in details for the video descriptions. Not all the videos are up right now….right now all the lightning talks are up.


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OQGRAPH at OpenSQL Camp 2009, Portland
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Antony is travelling up to Portland for this great event that’s about to start Fri evening and going over the weekend. He’ll be showing other devs and people more about the OQGRAPH engine, and gathering useful feedback.

Open Query is, together with many others (I see Giuseppe, Facebook, Gear6, Google, Infobright, Jeremy Cole, PrimeBase Technologies, Percona, Monty Program, and lots more), sponsoring the event so that it’s accessible for everybody – reducing the key factor to getting there rather than having to worry about high conf fees.

Having acquired the world’s biggest jetlag flying to Charlottesville VA for last year’s OpenSQL Camp, I can confirm from personal experience that it’s a great event. While I can’t be there this time, I’m looking forward to hearing all about it!

OQGRAPH update: speed, maze example, 5.0 packages
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Antony has done a bit of magic, considerably speeding up inserts. Since the base implementation does not have persistence, insert speed is particularly important. Copying the 2×89,051 edges for the Tree-of-Life example is now near-instant.

The delete bug has been fixed.

There’s a new Maze example in the OQGRAPH trunk on Launchpad, first introduced in my MySQL University session. I created/inserted a maze of 1 million rooms (that comes to about 3 million edges), and OQGRAPH found the shortest path (122330 steps for this particular maze) in abound one second. That’s pretty good, I

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OQGRAPH engine on MySQL University – 5 Nov 2009 10:00 UTC
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Only a few weeks after Walter’s session on Multi-Master Replication with MMM and thanks to the great gang at MySQL Docs (my colleagues from long ago!) I’ll be doing a MySQL University session in a few days, about the GRAPH computation engine. From talks/demos I’ve done about it so far, I’ve learnt that people love it but there are lots of interesting questions. After all, it’s a pretty new and in a way exotic thing.

MySQL University uses DimDim, an online presentation service. You’ll see slides, and hear my voice. You can also type questions in a live chat room. We actually even got desktop sharing working so a live demo is possible, we’ll see how that goes on the day (I’ll make sure to

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MySQL University: GRAPH computation engine for MySQL
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This Thursday (November 5th, 10:00 UTC - note the different time for this session!), Arjen Lentz of Open Query will present the brand new GRAPH computation engine for MySQL.

From the abstract: Most of us have had to deal with hierarchies (trees) and graphs (such as friend-of-a-friend style problems), and have thus learn that this is -at best- a bit of a monster to do in an SQL/RDBMS. Until now. The GRAPH engine (GPLv2 licensed) is a MySQL storage engine allowing hierarchies and more complex graph structures to be handled in a relational fashion. In a nutshell, tree structures and friend-of-a-friend style searches can now be done using standard

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MySQL University: GRAPH computation engine for MySQL
Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

This Thursday (November 5th, 10:00 UTC - note the different time for this session!), Arjen Lentz of Open Query will present the brand new GRAPH computation engine for MySQL.

From the abstract: Most of us have had to deal with hierarchies (trees) and graphs (such as friend-of-a-friend style problems), and have thus learn that this is -at best- a bit of a monster to do in an SQL/RDBMS. Until now. The GRAPH engine (GPLv2 licensed) is a MySQL storage engine allowing hierarchies and more complex graph structures to be handled in a relational fashion. In a nutshell, tree structures and friend-of-a-friend style searches can now be done using

  [Read more...]
MySQL University: GRAPH computation engine for MySQL
Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

This Thursday (November 5th, 10:00 UTC - note the different time for this session!), Arjen Lentz of Open Query will present the brand new GRAPH computation engine for MySQL.

From the abstract: Most of us have had to deal with hierarchies (trees) and graphs (such as friend-of-a-friend style problems), and have thus learn that this is -at best- a bit of a monster to do in an SQL/RDBMS. Until now. The GRAPH engine (GPLv2 licensed) is a MySQL storage engine allowing hierarchies and more complex graph structures to be handled in a relational fashion. In a nutshell, tree structures and friend-of-a-friend style searches can now be done using

  [Read more...]
OQGRAPH on Launchpad, graph examples
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The MySQL 5.0 and MySQL/MariaDB 5.1 source code is now also available through Launchpad. If you were waiting for a version for 5.1 and are ok with building the plugin from source, now you can!

The repo contains a subdir for examples, we’re hoping many people will contribute little snippets and scripts to import and use interesting datasets. To give you a hint, with graph capabilities you are able to deal with RDF data sources. You just need to transform the XML to say CSV, import into a suitable structure, and copy the edge information across to an OQGRAPH table.

Roland Bouman’s tree-of-life (which uses xslt stylesheets) are a good example of that approach, and was the first entry in the examples tree,

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Walking the Tree of Life in simple SQL
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Antony and I are busy getting the Open Query GRAPH Engine code ready so you all can play with it, but we needed to test with a larger dataset to make sure all was fundamentally well with the system.

We have some intersting suitable dataset sources, but the first we tried in ernest because it was easy to get in (thanks to Roland Bouman for both the idea and providing xslt stylesheets to transform the set), was the Tree of Life which is a hierarchy of 89052 entries showing how biological species on earth are related to eachother.

GRAPH engine operates in a directed fashion, so I inserted the connections both ways resulting in 178102 entries. So, I inserted A->B as well as B->A for each connection. So we now have a real graph, not just a simple tree.

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GRAPH engine – Mk.II
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The GRAPH engine allows you to deal with hierarchies and graphs in a purely relational way. So, we can find all children of an item, path from an item to a root node, shortest path between two items, and so on, each with a simple basic query structure using standard SQL grammar.

The engine is implemented as a MySQL/MariaDB 5.1 plugin (we’re working on a 5.0 backport for some clients) and thus runs with an unmodified server.

Demo time! I’ll simplify/strip a little bit here for space reasons, but what’s here is plain cut/paste from a running server, no edits

-- insert a few entries with connections (and multiple paths)
insert into foo (origid, destid) values (1,2), (2,3), (2,4), (4,5), (3,6), (5,6);
-- a regular table to join on to
insert into people values (1,"pearce"),(2,"hunnicut"),(3,"potter"),
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SQL graphics
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SQL is not meant to generate graphics, for sure; but I see some cases where generating non-tabular output can be desirable, as I will show in future posts.

I’d like to explain the basics of working SQL graphics: it is actually possible to do whatever you like. How?

Coordinates system

We’ll now develop a coordinates system using SQL. By producing this, I will have proven my point that anything is possible, and will provide an additional proof of concept.

To start with generating coordinates, I’ll need a helper table: a numbers table (tinyint_asc, example, with numbers ranging 0..255).

We’ll strive to produce a 10×10 coordinate matrix. To do this, we’ll self-join the numbers table against itself, and use a helper variable to set the size of the

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Showing entries 1 to 17

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