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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 30

Displaying posts with tag: GNU/Linux (reset)

Moved to a new hosting provider
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Again, I have moved to a new hosting provider after my free-tier with Amazon EC2 expired.  As usual I was looking for a good VPS provider with a decent price, providing good support and in particular a provider supporting FreeBSD, my favorite OS for server (for desktop I still prefer GNU/Linux.)

This time I have carefully reviewed many options and have finally settled with RootBSD, one of the reputed VPS hosting providers if you are choosing FreeBSD as your server OS.  One of the prime reasons for choosing FreeBSD is its performance, stability and the

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Downloading, compiling, and installing MySQL Server from source code
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This content has been updated and moved to a new place.


If you are running any GNU/Linux server operating system like RHEL 5 or CentOS 5, you may probably install MySQL server that comes with the operating system packages either during the initial setup or later using yum(8). The advantage being addition/removal of packages either using the GUI package manager or rpm(8), yum(8). Fair enough. But unfortunately the MySQL package (mysql-server) that comes bundled with RHEL 5.5 or CentOS 5.5 is fairly old (5.0.77). What if you want to install the latest stable version of MySQL yet have the advantage of removing/re-installing the software using rpm(8)?


In this blog post, I will guide you with compiling MySQL from source code yet installing the software through rpm(8) so that we tune and



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How to read Linux’s /proc/diskstats easily
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These days I spend more time looking at /proc/diskstats than I do at iostat. The problem with iostat is that it lumps reads and writes together, and I want to see them separately. That’s really important on a database server (e.g. MySQL performance analysis).

It’s not easy to read /proc/diskstats by looking at them, though. So I usually do the following to get a nice readable table:

  • Grep out the device I want to examine.
  • Push that through “rel” from the Aspersa project.
  • Add column headers, then format it with “align” from the same project.

Here’s a recipe. You might want to refer to the kernel iostat documentation too.

wget http://aspersa.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/rel
wget
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How Linux iostat computes its results
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iostat is one of the most important tools for measuring disk performance, which of course is very relevant for database administrators, whether your chosen database is Postgres, MySQL, Oracle, or anything else that runs on GNU/Linux. Have you ever wondered where statistics like await (average wait for the request to complete) come from? If you look at the disk statistics the Linux kernel makes available through files such as /proc/diskstats, you won’t see await there. How does iostat compute await? For that matter, how does it compute the average queue size, service time, and utilization? This blog post will show you how that’s computed.

First, let’s look at the fields in /proc/diskstats. The order and location varies between kernels, but the following

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Version 1.1.2 of improved Cacti templates released
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I’ve packaged up and released version 1.1.2 of the Cacti templates I’ve written for MySQL, Apache, memcached, nginx etc.

Anyone who would like to help write documentation (or do anything else, for that matter) is welcomed to participate. I’ll give commit access at the drop of a hat.

Changelog:

2009-05-07: version 1.1.2

	* The parsing code did not handle InnoDB plugin / XtraDB (issue 52).
	* The servername was hardcoded in ss_get_by_ssh.php (issue 57).
	* Added Handler_ graphs (issue 47).
	* Config files can be used instead of editing the .php file (issue 39).
	* binary log space is now calculated without a MySQL query (issue 48).
	* There was no easy way to force inputs to be filled (issue 45).
	* Some graphs were partially hidden without
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Why MySQL might not benefit from having a mother ship
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As I was driving with a colleague in California a couple of weeks ago during the conference, the topic of conversation turned to the notion that Percona and the rest of the MySQL community really need the presence of a central entity that provides a recognized home for the MySQL server. The conversation went something like “I was talking to so-and-so, and he said, you know, you guys really need Sun/MySQL, because without the mother ship, things will fall apart and your own business will fail.”

I happen to believe this is FUD, and that the reverse might actually be true. (This is one reason why we’re competing head-on with MySQL.) Having a “mother ship” is in the long run, a very complex scenario to fully understand.

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Secure, easy Cacti graphing without SNMP
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Cacti is a great tool for collecting information about systems and graphing it. However, it likes to use SNMP, and SNMP is often not desirable. Instead, I often see the need for a method that is:

  • Secure. Use trusted, well-known, encrypted communication. Do not open up new ports.
  • Zero install on the monitored system.
  • As little installation or modification on the monitoring system as possible.

Over the last several years, I’ve slowly created more and more software to create Cacti graphs via standard POSIX command-line utilities over SSH with key-pair authentication. (I’ve also created similar software for Nagios, but that’s another matter.) The major problem with the work I’ve done is that it’s totally un-publicized.

The system works by

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iopp: a tool to print I/O operations per-process
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Mark Wong’s entry titled “Following up a couple questions from the presentation at PSU on January 8, 2009” just caught my eye: What is ‘iopp’? It’s a custom tool to go through the Linux process table to get i/o statistics per process. It is open source and can be downloaded from: http://git.postgresql.org/?p=~markwkm/iopp.git;a=summary If you know me, you know I [...]
How to set up host interface networking for VirtualBox on Ubuntu
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VirtualBox is really nice, but if you’re like me, maybe you found the networking confusing. There are three ways to do it, as explained by the manual, and the best way is with host interfaces, which don’t have limitations like the inability to ping and so on. I found what I think is [...]
Off to DebConf 8 and Argentina
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I'm off in few hours to attend DebConf 8 in lovely Mar del Plata, Argentina.  The only bummer is that its winter down there so this seaside resort is going to be a bit chlly and as a result Im not able to pack as light as I usually do.  That being said, getting away from the string of 100 degree days that we've been having here in Austin isn't such a bad thing.

I had a great time at DebConf 7 in Edinburgh, particularly since it was a homecoming of sorts for me.  This time its exciting since I've never been to Argentina before and have heard great things.

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Off to DebConf 8 and Argentina
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I'm off in few hours to attend DebConf 8 in lovely Mar del Plata, Argentina.  The only bummer is that its winter down there so this seaside resort is going to be a bit chlly and as a result Im not able to pack as light as I usually do.  That being said, getting away from the string of 100 degree days that we've been having here in Austin isn't such a bad thing.

I had a great time at DebConf 7 in Edinburgh, particularly since it was a homecoming of sorts for me.  This time its exciting since I've never been to Argentina before and have heard great

  [Read more...]
Off to DebConf 8 and Argentina
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I'm off in few hours to attend DebConf 8 in lovely Mar del Plata, Argentina.  The only bummer is that its winter down there so this seaside resort is going to be a bit chlly and as a result Im not able to pack as light as I usually do.  That being said, getting away from the string of 100 degree days that we've been having here in Austin isn't such a bad thing.

I had a great time at DebConf 7 in Edinburgh, particularly since it was a homecoming of sorts for me.  This time its exciting since I've never been to Argentina before and have heard

  [Read more...]
How I hacked the HP Media Vault to support OGG and FLAC files
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Let me begin by saying “I am so not a gadget guy.” I don’t have an iPhone. Heck, I didn’t have a cellphone at all until April when I joined Percona as a consultant. I don’t ooh and aah over other people’s gadgets most of the time. I don’t have, you know, that kind of envy. I’m sure you see where this is going: I got a gadget and I think it’s really cool.

Anyway, my wife and I have a bunch of computers (desktops and laptops) and we had been feeling the pain for a long time: the files were only on one computer, and we wanted them available. I built a file server and then realized that it was going to be really expensive in terms of power alone, so I went back to USB drives for backups, and kept thinking about it.

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Back From Boston and the Red Hat Summit and FUDCON
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The second half of last week I attended the Red Hat Summit and FUDCon which Sun and MySQL were silver sponsors of.  The events were co-located at the Hynes convention center in Boston. 

Although both events featured an impressive list of topics and tracks, other than the keynotes I spent the majority of my time meeting and talking to people.   One of my goals was to figure out how Sun can better work with Fedora to get more of our software into their distro. 


A few key Fedorans: Max Spevak, Dennis Gilmore, Tom "Spot" Callaway, Jeremy Katz, Paul Frields, Jesse


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Back From Boston and the Red Hat Summit and FUDCON
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The second half of last week I attended the Red Hat Summit and FUDCon which Sun and MySQL were silver sponsors of.  The events were co-located at the Hynes convention center in Boston. 

Although both events featured an impressive list of topics and tracks, other than the keynotes I spent the majority of my time meeting and talking to people.   One of my goals was to figure out how Sun can better work with Fedora to get more of our software into their distro. 


A few key Fedorans: Max Spevak, Dennis Gilmore, Tom "Spot" Callaway, Jeremy Katz, Paul Frields, Jesse


  [Read more...]
Back From Boston and the Red Hat Summit and FUDCON
+0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

The second half of last week I attended the Red Hat Summit and FUDCon which Sun and MySQL were silver sponsors of.  The events were co-located at the Hynes convention center in Boston. 

Although both events featured an impressive list of topics and tracks, other than the keynotes I spent the majority of my time meeting and talking to people.   One of my goals was to figure out how Sun can better work with Fedora to get more of our software into their distro. 


A few key Fedorans: Max Spevak, Dennis Gilmore, Tom "Spot" Callaway, Jeremy Katz, Paul Frields, Jesse


  [Read more...]
Ubuntu Developer Summit - Prague
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On Monday this week I attended the first day of the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Prague.  The summit which just ended today, was intended to drive plans and decisions for the next Ubuntu release "Intrepid Ibex" which is due out on October 30th.  (Check out the reports from the summit here.)


Mark welcomes the masses while Jono scans the crowd for hecklers.

Sun had about 12 folks there representing GlassFish, Open JDK, NetBeans,



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Maatkit in RHEL and CentOS
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Update: Karanbir says “Just one thing to keep in mind is that we dont want too many people using it from the Testing repository - we only need enough feedback to move it from testing to stable ( and to be honest, there are already 8 people who have said yes it works - so move to stable should happen within the next 24 - 48 hrs ). Once the package is in stable, users on CentOS4 and 5 wont need to do anything more than just ‘yum install maatkit’ and it will install for them.”

At least one person (Karanbir Singh) is working to get Maatkit into the CentOS repositories, and I believe there might be movement towards RHEL also. From an email to the Maatkit discussion list a little while ago,

I am in

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Summary of beCamp 2008
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Yesterday I went to beCamp 2008 along with four roomfuls of other people interested in technology (perhaps close to 100 people total). The conference was a lot of fun. Not everything went as planned, but that was as planned. This was an Open Spaces conference and I thought it worked very well. From an email Eric Pugh sent:

Basically it all boils down to:

Open Space is the Law of Two Feet: if anyone finds themselves in a place where they are neither learning nor contributing they should move to somewhere more productive. And from the law flow four principles:

  • Whoever comes are the right people
  • Whatever happens is the only thing that could have
  • Whenever it starts
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pre-compiled binaries in your PATH
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I prefer to install mySQL using the pre-compiled binaries. Depending on the environment, these usually go in either /opt or /usr/local. When you choose this type of install, chances are you are going to need to ensure that you somehow configure your system so that the mysql binaries end up in your PATH. If you are [...]
A different angle on the MySQL Conference
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There are quite a few business angles you might see only if you’re here at the conference, and you won’t get from blogs. For example, let’s take a look at the contents of the shoulder bags they hand out with your registration. (This is only a partial list.)

  • SnapLogic’s flyer gets it right: their system is compatible with “GNU Linux.” Hooray, a commercial company acknowledging the GNU operating system for what it is!
  • MySQL Enterprise’s flyer has three big bullet points: MySQL Load Balancer, MySQL Connection Manager, and MySQL Enterprise Monitor Query Analyzer. The first two look like they’re probably built on MySQL Proxy. The last has a visual explain plan feature, which according to an elevator conversation is not yet built. I’ll stop by their booth and see. As you may know,
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The Linux Foundation Summit: Of Maddogs and Englishmen (and Sharks)
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Earlier this week I attended the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, serendipitously held here Austin.  It was a fantastic opportunity to meet a lot of the people in the community whom I hadn't met before as well as to catch up with old friends.

 
Maddog (R) helping Executive Director Jim "Led" Zemlin to Flourish 

Great Speakers
(and I'm not talking Bose, which really aren't great speakers anyway)

There was an




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Henceforth, I dub thee GLAMP
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I've decided to start replacing L with GL in acronyms where L supposedly stands for Linux.

I'm not a big user of acronyms, because I think they are exclusionist and they obscure, rather than revealing. (This wouldn't matter if I wrote for people who already knew what I meant and agreed with me, but that's a waste of time). However, LAMP is one that I've probably used a few times, without thinking that it is supposed to stand for Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP/Perl/Python. In fact, it doesn't refer to Linux, it refers to GNU/Linux. Therefore, it should be GLAMP.

Why does this matter? I try not to say Linux, unless I'm referring to a kernel, because a kernel is not an operating system. I try to be pretty careful about saying GNU/Linux when I'm talking about an operating system. An

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How I built the NOW_USEC() UDF for MySQL
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Last week I wrote about my efforts to measure MySQL's replication speed precisely. The most important ingredient in that recipe was the user-defined function to get the system time with microsecond precision. This post is about that function, which turned out to be surprisingly easy to write.

Review of Pro Nagios 2.0 and Nagios System and Network Monitoring
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Last week I read two books on Nagios. I found one easy to use and the other difficult.

Why I (still) like Gentoo
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I wrote a post recently that focused only on things I see as shortcomings or problems with Gentoo GNU/Linux. That was the intent of the article, to explain why I switched to Ubuntu for my personal systems. On the flip side, nothing's perfect, but nothing's perfectly flawed, either. There are still many things I like about Gentoo.

More GnuCash to MySQL tools and queries
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I wrote a while ago about a program I wrote to export GnuCash data into a MySQL database, including a couple of queries against the resulting schema. I've made some improvements since then to allow a simple overlay of my wife's expense categories onto the GnuCash hierarchy. This article explains the improved schema, and includes some more useful tools and queries.

To Gentoo or not to Gentoo?
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Some people who know I've used Gentoo asked me my thoughts on using it for MySQL servers. Here are my opinions and experiences using Gentoo, both for desktop systems and for servers.

A review of the Glom graphical database front-end
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Glom is an interesting graphical database front-end I've been meaning to try out for some time. Someone asked about graphical database front-ends on the #mysql IRC channel recently, and that prompted me to install Glom and learn how to use it. My overall impressions? It lands squarely in the middle of its target audience's needs, but still has a quirk here and there. With a bit of polish it will be a fine product, and it's already a winner over Microsoft Access and Filemaker, two similar programs with which you might be familiar. In this article I'll walk through installing and configuring Glom, a simple database design, a quick peek under the hood, an archaeologist's experiences using it, and give my opinions about Glom in detail.

How we enabled threading in MySQL
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MySQL on GNU/Linux appears to be able to either run multiple processes, or one process and multiple threads. We've noticed a significant CPU penalty for multiple processes, probably from the context switching overhead. The trouble was, one of our servers wouldn't use threads; it wanted to use multiple processes. This article explains how we got it to use threads instead.

Showing entries 1 to 30 of 30

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