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Displaying posts with tag: gzip (reset)
Which Compression Tool Should I Use for my Database Backups? (Part II: Decompression)

On my post last week, I analysed some of the most common compression tools and formats, and its compression speed and ratio. While that could give us a good idea of the performance of those tools, the analysis would be incomplete without researching the decompression. This is particularly true for database backups as, for those cases where the compression process is performed outside of the production boxes, you may not care too much about compression times. In that case, even if it is relatively slow, it will not affect the performance of your MySQL server (or whatever you are using). The decompression time, however, can be critical, as it may influence in many cases the MTTR of your whole system.

Testing …

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Which Compression Tool Should I Use for my Database Backups? (Part I: Compression)

This week we are talking about size, which is a subject that should matter to any system administrator in charge of the backup system of any project, and in particular database backups.

I sometimes get questions about what should be the best compression tool to apply during a particular backup system: gzip? bzip2? any other?

The testing environment

In order to test several formats and tools, I created a .csv file (comma-separated values) that was 3,700,635,579 bytes in size by transforming a recent dump of all the OpenStreetMap nodes of the European portion of Spain. It had a total of 46,741,126 rows and looked like this:

171773  38.6048402      -0.0489871      4       2012-08-25 00:37:46     12850816        472193  rubensd
171774  38.6061981      -0.0496867      2       2008-01-19 10:23:21     666916  9250 …
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What compression do you use?

The following is an evaluation of various compression utilities that I tested when reviewing the various options for MySQL backup strategies. The overall winner in performance was pigz, a parallel implementation of gzip. If you use gzip today as most organizations do, this one change will improve your backup compression times.

Details of the test:

  • The database is 5.4GB of data
  • mysqldump produces a backup file of 2.9GB
  • The server is an AWS t1.xlarge with a dedicated EBS volume for backups

The following testing was performed to compare the time and % compression savings of various available open source products. This was not an exhaustive test with multiple iterations and different types of data files.

Compression Time
Decompression Time
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ZFS & MySQL/InnoDB Compression Update setup in Vegas, Thumper disk bay, green by Shawn Ferry

As I expected it would, the fact that I used ZFS compression on our MySQL volume in my little OpenSolaris experiment struck a chord in the comments. I chose gzip-9 for our first pass for a few reasons:

  1. I wanted to see what the “best case” compression ratio was for our dataset (InnoDB tables)
  2. I wanted to see what the “worst case” CPU usage was for our workload
  3. I don’t have a lot of time. I need to try something quick & dirty.

I got both those data points with enough granularity to be useful: a 2.12X compression ratio over a …

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Success with OpenSolaris + ZFS + MySQL in production!

Pimp My Drive by Richard and Barb

There’s remarkably little information online about using MySQL on ZFS, successfully or not, so I did what any enterprising geek would do: Built a box, threw some data on it, and tossed it into production to see if it would sink or swim.

I’m a Linux geek, have been since 1993 (Slackware!). All of SmugMug’s datacenters (and our EC2 images) are built on Linux. But the current state of filesystems on Linux is awful, and …

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Showing entries 1 to 5