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Showing entries 1 to 13

Displaying posts with tag: Datacenter (reset)

Building a MySQL Private Cloud: Step 1
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Building clusters is usually a fun time. Here’s one of my setups at the Equinix LAX1 facility that is being used for VPN services, OpenVZ clustering, and general RADIUS and MySQL clustering integration. Once the clustering design is finalized, it’s still in flux state while I try out different setups, I’ll post some physical+logical architecture diagrams to show “How to Build a Fault Tolerant Infrastructure for Virtualized MySQL NDB Cluster + Python-based VPN systems.” Stay tuned for more.

MySQL 5.5.4 looks awesome.
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Been at the MySQL conference the last few days, and I have to say, I’m really blown away by MySQL 5.5.4‘s improvements.  Last year I keynoted and I begged Oracle on stage to realize that MySQL and InnoDB under one roof represented opportunity.  It’s clear they heard the community – this is some serious progress, and right when we needed it.

Jeremy Zawodny’s blog post covers most of the stuff I’m really excited about, and there are some great detailed technical slides

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My MySQL keynote slides and video
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Been asked a few times in the last few days about where my slides are from my MySQL keynote from *last* year.

Ooops.

Um, yeah.  Sorry about that.  Here’s a link to ‘The SmugMug Tale’ slides, and you can watch the video below:

Sorry for the extreme lag.  I suck.

The important highlights go something like this:

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Web roundup
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Ian Bullard asserts that you should never use the RAND() function. The Ayn Rand Google Ad is pretty funny. The new Zend Server is coming out as a web stack. Although it can be easier to install a Xampp style … Continue reading →
Great things afoot in the MySQL community
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tl;dr: The MySQL community rocks. Percona, XtraDB, Drizzle, SSD storage, InnoDB IO scalability challenges.

For anyone who lives and dies by MySQL and InnoDB, things are finally starting to heat up and get interesting. I’ve been banging the “MySQL/InnoDB scales poorly” drums for years now, and despite having paid Enterprise licenses, I haven’t been able to get anywhere. I was pretty excited when Sun

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On Why Auto-Scaling in the Cloud Rocks
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In high school, I had a great programmable calculator. I’d program it to solve complicated math and science problems “automatically” for me. Most of my teachers got upset if they found out, but I’ll always remember one especially enlightened teacher who didn’t. He said something to the effect of “Hey, if you managed to write software to solve the equation, you must thoroughly understand the problem. Way to go!”.

George Reese wrote up a blog post over at O’Reilly the other day called On Why I Don’t Like Auto-Scaling in the Cloud. His main argument seems to be that auto-scaling is bad and reflects poor capacity planning. In the comments, he specifically calls

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Sweet new Sun storage stuff on Monday, Nov 10th
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FYI, Sun is announcing some sweet new storage stuff on Monday at 3:30pm PT.

I’m reviewing a few of the things they’re announcing, and hope to publish my thoughts here soon (one of them joins my production network tonight if all goes well). However, I’m at Disneyland with my kids (first trip!) from Monday through Thursday, so I don’t know (yet) when I’ll be able to write them up. Bear with me if it takes a few days.

But the gear is exciting, and the direction Sun is headed is even more exciting!

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ZFS & MySQL/InnoDB Compression Update
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Network.com setup in Vegas, Thumper disk bay, green by Shawn Ferry

As I expected it would, the fact that I used ZFS compression on our MySQL volume in my little OpenSolaris experiment struck a chord in the comments. I chose gzip-9 for our first pass for a few reasons:

  • I wanted to see what the “best case” compression ratio was for our dataset (InnoDB tables)
  • I wanted to see what the “worst case” CPU usage was for our workload
  • I don’t have a lot of time. I need to try something quick & dirty.
  • I got both

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    Success with OpenSolaris + ZFS + MySQL in production!
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    Pimp My Drive by Richard and Barb

    There’s remarkably little information online about using MySQL on ZFS, successfully or not, so I did what any enterprising geek would do: Built a box, threw some data on it, and tossed it into production to see if it would sink or swim.

    I’m a Linux geek, have been since 1993 (Slackware!). All of SmugMug’s datacenters (and

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    MySQL and the Linux swap problem
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    Ever since Peter over at Percona wrote about MySQL and swap, I’ve been meaning to write this post. But after I saw Dathan Pattishall’s post on the subject, I knew I’d better actually do it.

    There’s a nasty problem with Linux 2.6 even when you have a ton of RAM. No matter what you do, including setting /proc/sys/vm/swappiness = 0, your OS is going to prefer swapping stuff out rather than freeing up system cache. On a single-use machine, where the application is better at utilizing RAM than the system is, this is incredibly

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    Death of MySQL read replication highly exaggerated
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    I know I’m a little late to the discussion, but Brian Aker posted a thought-provoking piece on the imminent death of MySQL replication to scale reads.  His premise is that memcached is so cool and scales so much better, that read replication scaling is going to become a think of the past.  Other MySQL community people, like Arjen and Farhan, chimed in too.

    Now, I love memcached.  We use it as a vital layer in our datacenters, and we couldn’t live without it.  But it’s not a total solution to

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    The Sky is Falling! MySQL charging for features!
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    There’s quite a bit of buzz on the blogosphere from people I respect a great deal, like Jeremy Cole at Proven Scaling and Vadim at Percona, about MySQL’s new Enterprise backup plans.  

    The big deal?  They’re releasing a Community version that doesn’t have all the same features as the Enterprise version of Online Backup, including compression and encryption.  The Community version is open-sourced under GPL, the Enterprise version is not.

    Personally, I think this is awesome. Don’t get me wrong – I love open source.  We couldn’t have built our business without it, and we love it when we get a chance

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    ?Gatekeepers of the Datacenter? vs. Freedom of choice in IT
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    I’ve written in the past about how enterprise management vendors can act as “Gatekeepers of the Datacenter” by virtue of what technologies they do or don’t support as part of their management solutions. This rather lame dynamic is a big part of the reason why a lot of otherwise great technologies dont make it all the way into the traditional enterprise.

    The problem gets further compounded when one of these “Gatekeepers” is also a platform or stack vendor. See, it’s hard to resist the temptation of delivering the absolute best management for IBM products from a Tivoli solution while shortchanging non-IBM ones. Or, to lay this on one of the aspiring members of the big 4… how about getting support for SQL Server on Oracle’s Enterprise Manager. Hmmm… I’m gonna guess it sucks

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    Showing entries 1 to 13

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