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Displaying posts with tag: postgresql (reset)

Disproving the CAP Theorem
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Since the famous conjecture by Eric Brewer and proof by Nancy Lynch et al., CAP has given the world countless learned discussions about distributed systems and many a well-funded start-up.  Yet who truly understands what CAP means?  Even a cursory survey of the blogosphere shows profound disagreement about the meaning of terms like CP, AP, and CA in real systems.  Those who disagree on CAP include some of the most illustrious personages of the database community.

We can therefore state with some confidence that CAP is confusing. Yet this observation itself raises deeper questions.  Is CAP merely confusing?  Or is it the case that as with other initially accepted but

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Black-Box Performance Analysis with TCP Traffic
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This is a cross-post from the MySQL Performance Blog. I thought it would be interesting to users of PostgreSQL, Redis, Memcached, and $system-of-interest as well.

For about the past year I’ve been formulating a series of tools and practices that can provide deep insight into system performance simply by looking at TCP packet headers, and when they arrive and depart from a system. This works for MySQL as well as a lot of other types of systems, because it doesn’t require any of the contents of the packet. Thus, it works without knowledge of what the server and client are conversing about. Packet headers contain only information that’s usually regarded as non-sensitive (IP address, port, TCP flags, etc), so it’s

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On datatypes, domains and why I think it's time we reconsidered
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What's in a datatype then? A MySQL SMALLINT? A C int? An Oracle BLOB? One thing is for sure, they are not very well standardized, not even within the same environment, and much less so across them. And what does it means, really? When should I use a BLOB, when a BINARY VARCHAR and when to use a long long?

A datatype defines many attributes:
  • What data I can store in it: Only numbers? Printable alaphanumeric characters? Unicode? Binary data? An object?
  • What I can do with a value of that particular type and how does it behave? Can I concatenate two values? Add them (that is NOT the same as concatenate! The same operator (+) may be used, but it's not the same thing!)? Save it to a file?
  • How is it stored and represented in technical terms. And this can be argued, a C int doesn't define how it is stored on disk, but a MySQL INT



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Continuent Partners With VNC To Collaborate in DACH
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Continuent is increasing its presence in Europe to offer our solutions and services for the open source database business sector in the region. VNC is Continuent's new partner in Germany, Austria and Switzerland (DACH). Read the entire press release here.Continuent and VNC are hosting a live webcast demonstrating advanced MySQL and PostgreSQL replication and clustering with Continuent Tungsten
MySQL and PostgreSQL Cloud Offerings – linux.conf.au 2012 miniconf talk by myself and Selena
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Selena and I gave a talk on the various issues of running databases “in the cloud” at the recent linux.conf.au in Ballarat. Video is up, embedded below:

German webinar Feb 7th at 15:00 CET: Hochverfügbarkeit und Performance von MySQL und PostgreSQL
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Zahlreiche Unternehmen verlassen sich auf MySQL und PostgreSQL für die Datenverwaltung. Aber was passiert, wenn die Datenbank abstürzt oder eine Wartung benötigt? Wie können Sie sicherstellen, dass Ihre Datenbank Höchstleistung bringt mit minimalem Arbeitsaufwand für den Administrator und maximaler Auslastung der vorhandenen Hardware? Erfahren Sie, wie VNC und Continuent Tungsten Enterprise
I Really Dislike Anonymous Attacks
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If you are interested in NoSQL databases (or maybe not) perhaps you have seen the anonymous "warning" about using MongoDB.   It concludes with the following pious request:

  Please take this warning seriously.

Now there are a lot of great resources about data management on the web but the aforementioned rant is not one of them.  If you plan to write technical articles and have people take them seriously, here are a few tips.
  • Sign your name.  Readers are more impressed when they see you are not afraid to stand behind your words. 
  • Explain what problem you were trying to solve.  Otherwise uncharitable readers might think you just started pumping information into a new database without thinking about possible consequences and now





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    MariaDB Statistics and Surveys
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    I just finished reading a couple of interesting, and somewhat related, blog posts which I think are worth sharing (apologies to anyone who has already seen them). One is from Jelastic and the other is from Michal Hrušecký.

    I’ve written about MariaDB and the Jelastic cloud before (see MariaDB now available as a hosted database via Jelastic cloud platform). Now Jelastic has published statistics on the relative popularity of the various databases they offer. The good news is MariaDB is currently the database of choice for 14% of their customers. The bad news is that we’re in fourth place behind their other three database choices

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    When systems scale better than linearly
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    I’ve been seeing a few occasions where Neil J. Gunther’s Universal Scalability Law doesn’t seem to model all of the important factors in a system as it scales. Models are only models, and they’re not the whole truth, so they never match reality perfectly. But there appear to be a small number of cases where systems can actually scale a bit better than linearly over a portion of the domain, due to what I’ve been calling an “economy of scale.” I believe that the Universal Scalability Law might need a third factor (seriality, coherency, and the new factor, economy of scale). I don’t think that the results I’m seeing can be modeled adequately with only two parameters.

    Here are two publicly available cases that appear to demonstrate this phenomenon: Robert Haas’s

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    Open Source Hardware
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    Back in 2010 I stopped buying test servers from Dell and began building them from components using Intel i7 processors, X58-based mother boards, and modular power supplies from Ultra.  It was a good way to learn about hardware.  Besides, it was getting old to pay for Dell desktop systems with Windows, which I would then wipe off when installing Linux.  Between the educational value of understanding the systems better, selecting the exact components I wanted, and being able to fix problems quickly, it has been one of the best investments I have ever made.  And it didn't cost any more than equivalent Dell servers.

    For this reason, a couple of recent articles about computer hardware caught my attention.  First, Dell is losing business

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    451 CAOS Links 2011.09.23
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    Red Hat revenue up 28% in Q2. Funding for NoSQL vendors. And more.

    # Red Hat reported net income of $40m in the second quarter on revenue up 28% to $281.3m.

    # 10gen raised $20m in funding, while DataStax closed an $11m series B round, while also releasing its DataStax Enterprise and Community products. Additionally Neo Technology

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    Blog Summary for Week of September 5
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    1. Apache and MySQL Logging with Syslog-ng
    This article shows how to use the popular system logging tool Syslog-ng to log Apache and MySQL events. Apache does not log via syslog-ng by default so we go over two methods of easily remedying this. We also show how to use SQL queries to view syslog-ng data.

    2. Using M3 to take System Monitors to the Next Level
    Monitis provides built in functionality to monitor a wide variety of system statistics as well as the ability to create custom system monitors. Monitis Monitor Manager, or M3 for short, allows you


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    What's Next for Tungsten Replicator
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    As Giuseppe Maxia recently posted we released Tungsten Replicator 2.0.4 this week.  It has a raft of bug fixes and new features of which one-line installations are the single biggest improvement.  I set up replicators dozens of times a day and having a single command for standard cluster topologies is a huge step forward.  Kudos to Jeff Mace for getting this nailed down.

    So what's next?  You can get see what we are up to in general by looking at our issues list.  We cannot do everything at once, but here are the current priorities for Tungsten Replicator 2.0.5.
    • Parallel replication speed



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    451 CAOS Links 2011.08.31
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    MapR and Funambol raise funding. VMware virtually supports PostgreSQL. And more.

    # MapR raised $20m series B for its Hadoop distribution from Redpoint Ventures, Lightspeed Venture Partners and NEA.

    # Funambol raised $3m in funding from previous investors HIG Ventures, Pacven Walden Ventures and Nexit Infocom.

    # VMware launched vFabric Postgres as part of vFabric Data Director database-as-a-service launch.

    # Citrix released a new edition of CloudStack, making the

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    Mobile Internet Access in Germany for Open Source Road Warriors
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    Reliable Internet access is a long-standing problem for road warriors visiting foreign countries.  Open source developers in particular have problems reconciling travel with addiction to high-bandwidth network access from laptop computers.  Wi-Fi hotspots are scarce, costly, often slow, and in some cases complicated by inconvenient local laws like Italy's Pisanu Decree.  International mobile network access plans are ridiculously expensive or like DROAM have download limits that make them useless for serious programming.

    The best solution in many cases is to look for a local pre-paid mobile access plan in each country you visit.   Mobile networks are widely available and fast in developed regions, and there are cheap

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    I’ll be presenting at Postgres Open 2011
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    I’ve been accepted to present at the brand-new and very exciting Postgres Open 2011 about system scaling, TCP traffic, and mathematical modeling. I’m really looking forward to it — it will be my first PostgreSQL conference in a couple of years! See you there.

    Related posts:

  • Postgres folks, consider the 2011 MySQL conference
  • O’Reilly MySQL 2011 conference CfP is open
  • My sessions at the O’Reilly MySQL Conference 2011
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    PostGIS 1.5 in Postgresql 9.0 install on CentOS 5.6
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    I love short and consist install instructions. I know this is a MySQL blog but our good friend PostGreSQL has a great GIS library. This is what I learned upgrading our PostGIS system to GIS 1.5. Much thanks to Jeremy Tunnell for give this document it’s start.

    Start with CentOS 5.6 x86_64 basic install.

    Add the PostgreSQL Yum repository to your system.

     $ wget http://yum.pgrpms.org/reporpms/9.0/pgdg-centos-9.0-2.noarch.rpm
     $ rpm -i pgdg-centos-9.0-2.noarch.rpm

    Another location for these is DAG. I have to tried these so your results may very.

    You will need to exclude the packages CentOS provide by added two lines to the BASE and UPDATE sections of /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-Base.repo. They are:

    exclude=postgresql*
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    OSS-DB Database certification
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    What will be first? The new and updated MySQL certification or the new OSS-DB exam which is announced by LPI in Japan?

    The OSS-DB is only for PostgreSQL for now, but will cover more opensource databases in the future.

    There seem to be two levels:

    • Silver: Management consulting engineers who can improve large-scale database

    • Gold: Engineers who can design, development, implementation and operation of the database


    The google translate version can be found here. I found this info on Tatsuo Ishii's blog
    Open Database Camp 2011 opens today!
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    The Open Database Camp 2011 opens today with the Welcome Party, starting today at 7pm CEST. The party (with good Italian food and drinks) is open to all the ones who have registered in the Attendees list.
    By car you have to reach Pula, take Via Nora (Nora Street), than Via Sant'Efisio (Sant'Efisio Street), until the end, directly to the party location.
    Organisers will also make a bus available on Friday 6 May, leaving from Pula Hotels (Nora Club Hotel - Villa Madau - Baia Di Nora - Is Molas - Marin Hotel - Is Morus Hotel) around 18:30 and reaching

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    Advanced Logical Replication for PostgreSQL (1/3)
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    Intro

    Open source Tungsten Replicator for MySQL enables multi-master, parallel and even heterogeneous replication, together with zero-down time schema upgrades, transaction filtering and more, but all these features are hardly available for another elephant in the room - i.e. PostgreSQL. At least, that was true until now.

    These article series present my recent extension to Tungsten Replicator, which enables logical replication for PostgreSQL and, effectively, opens up all the advanced




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    Tungsten Supports Logical Replication on PostgreSQL
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    Thanks to my colleague Linas Virbalas, Tungsten Replicator has just taken the next step to support full logical replication for PostgreSQL.  Linas posted an article today on his new blog describing PostgreSQL logical replication using SLONY triggers.  I saw a demo of his implementation and was really impressed.   For more information you should read the article, which provides an excellent description of how Tungsten replicates from SLONY logs.

    It is pretty exciting whenever Tungsten replicates data to or from a new DBMS type, but PostgreSQL logical replication is really special.  Tungsten Replicator has been able to manage native

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    Introducing the Flying Clusters, and more than MySQL replication
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    My Colleague Linas Virbalas has just crossed the boundary between real and virtual and has started a blog, titled Flying Clusters.
    Linas is a gifted developer who is taking care of the special projects. One of such projects is replication between MySQL and PostgreSQL, which works quite well.Another project, which has just started, is about providing PostgreSQL with Advanced Logical Replication using Tungsten replicator. As you probably know, recent versions of PostgreSQL can do physical
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    GreenSQL May Webinars invitation
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    GreenSQL invites you to participate in our May Webinars
    MAY 18- Securing Databases in Minutes with GreenSQL Express
    MAY 24 – Unified Database Security, the Next Generation of Database Security
    Press here to sign
    http://hosted.verticalresponse.com/579426/4aa0167718/316941501/bdea25b57a/

    Replication : different points of view
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    The following quotes are the first sentences in the replication chapter of two similar books. Both are admin cookbooks. One is for PostgreSQL, one for MySQL.

    Replication isn't magic, though it can be pretty cool. It's even cooler when it works, and that's what this chapter is all about.
    Replication requires understanding, effort, and patience. There are a significant number of points to get right. My emphasis here is on providing simple approaches to get you started, and some clear best practices on operational robustness
    PostgreSQL 9 Admin Cookbook

    Replication is an interesting feature of MySQL that can be used for a variety of purposes. It can help to balance server load across multiple machines, ease backups, provide a





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    Open Database camp 2011 - Travel logistics, and don't forget the party
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    The Open Database Camp 2011 is near. In 9 days, the welcome party starts, and then the conference itself gets going.
    If you are coming earlier than Friday, May 6th, you can either use public transportation or book a private seat with a volunteer in the car pooling page. Please help the organizers: post your arrival and departure dates and times, so we may be able to help you even outside the official conference days.
    About the conference itself, as everyone should know, it's a

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    Have you missed the MySQL Conference? Come to OpenDbCamp!
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    The MySQL Conference is over. There have been many new developments, and the ones who have missed it will probably want to get a summary of the excitement, possibly from the people who have contributed to shaping the news.
    The Open Database Camp will give users an opportunity to catch up. Especially to open source users in Europe.
    Come and share the fun. There will be talks on MySQL, PostgreSQL, several NoSQL products, and a bunch of other cool stuff.
    Open Database camp 2011 - Opportunities for sponsors, culture, and more
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    The Open Database Camp 2011 is barely one month away.

    Sponsorship

    Many thanks to all the sponsors! We very much appreciate your support.
    Speaking of what, here is some important information for sponsors: The venue owners, Sardegna Ricerche, has given us the availabilkity of an ample hall for sponsors, where they can showcase their products and services.
    Each sponsor will have a desk, and a double panel sized cm 195 x 75 (6.3 x 2.4 feet).

    Culture, fun, and more

    The Science park is something unique that geeks may want to visit. It is one of the biggest research centers in Europe, and the owners have graciously organized a guided tour before and after the conference.
    Near the conference there is Nora, an





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    PgEast 2011 Day The Second
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    Well day two here at PgEast has drawn to a close and it was another
    very informative day.

    Today I concentrated on the more common tasks of a Pg DBA so I attended three
    talks (four if you count mine) that where rather heavy on the technical side of being a Pg DBA

    Keven Kempter drew me back again with his excellent talk on Backup and recovery methods
    this time giving some very good advice on how to use and abuse of pg_Dump_all and
    PG_restore. He also touched on three different recipes PITR on ProstgreSQL and gave some handy
    advice on when and why to use it.

    I also caught another Mongo talk this time by Steve Francia it was on the application of Mongo
    in a real world web retail store. He presented a very convincing argument for the NoSQL side of things in
    the retail realm namely that RDBMS works great when you have but a few similar






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    Day One at PGEast 11
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    I guess I brought the snow with me to New York as I awoke to a nice 10cm dump. Anyway today would best be described as a day of ‘Disruptive Tech’

    I first attended Kevin Kempters intro into PorstgreSQL High Availability. A very well balanced presentation that gave a very good overview of what is available out of the box for both Warm Standbys and Hot Standbys how they can be very easily implemented. He also gave a quick overview of other tools that can be used including Slony for detailed fail-overs and PgPool for load balancing and relication. Not very disruptive but it does show that Pg is on par with most of the heavy hitters such as MySQL and Oracle.

    The keynote this year was by Ed Boyajian the CEO or EnerpriseDB and he gave an big picture of the DB in terms of market which is a whopping 26$ Billion a year in the US alone of which the the two five players have 90% of the

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    Benchmarking ORM tools and Object Databases.
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    “I believe that one should benchmark before making any technology decisions.” An interview with Pieter van Zyl creator of the OO7J benchmark. In August last year, I published an interesting resource in ODBMS.ORG, the dissertation of Pieter van Zyl, from the University of Pretoria:“Performance investigation into selected object persistence stores”. The dissertation presented the OO7J [...]
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