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Displaying posts with tag: high-availability (reset)
ProxySQL and Percona XtraDB Cluster (Galera) Integration

In this post, we’ll discuss how an integrated ProxySQL and Percona XtraDB Cluster (Galera) helps manage node states and failovers.

ProxySQL is designed to not perform any specialized operation in relation to the servers with which it communicates. Instead, it uses an event scheduler to extend functionalities and cover any special needs.

Given that specialized products like Percona XtraDB Cluster are not managed by ProxySQL, they require the design and implementation of good/efficient extensions.

In this article, I will illustrate how Percona XtraDB Cluster/Galera can be integrated with ProxySQL to get the best from both.

Brief digression

Before discussing their integration, we need to review a couple of very important concepts in ProxySQL. ProxySQL has a very important logical component: Hostgroup(s) (HG).

A hostgroup is a relation …

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ProxySQL and MHA Integration

This blog post discusses ProxySQL and MHA integration, and how they work together.

MHA (Master High Availability Manager and tools for MySQL) is almost fully integrated with the ProxySQL process. This means you can count on the MHA standard feature to manage failover, and ProxySQL to manage the traffic and shift from one server to another.

This is one of the main differences between MHA and VIP, and MHA and ProxySQL: with MHA/ProxySQL, there is no need to move IPs or re-define DNS.

The following is an example of an MHA configuration file for use with ProxySQL:

server default]
    user=mha
    password=mha
    ssh_user=root
    repl_password=replica
    manager_log=/tmp/mha.log
    manager_workdir=/tmp
    remote_workdir=/tmp
    master_binlog_dir=/opt/mysql_instances/mha1/logs …
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MHA Quick Start Guide

MHA (Master High Availability Manager and tools for MySQL) is one of the most important pieces of our managed services. When properly set up, it can check replication health, move writer and reader virtual IPs, perform failovers, and have its output constantly monitored by Nagios. Is it easy to deploy and follows the KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) philosophy that I love so much.

This blog post is a quick start guide to try it out and play with it in your own testing environment. I assume that you already know how to install software, deal with SSH keys and setup replication in MySQL. The post just covers MHA configuration.

Testing environment

Taken from /etc/hosts

192.168.1.116      mysql-server1
192.168.1.117   mysql-server2
192.168.1.118   mysql-server3
192.168.1.119   mha-manager

mysql-server1: Our master …

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MySQL Group Replication: A Quick Start Guide

With the new Group Replication Beta release—0.8 for MySQL 5.7.14—available for download on labs.mysql.com, I expect more and more people to begin engaging in various forms of proof-of-concept attempts. So I wanted to create a “quick start guide” (to replace this outdated getting started post) focused on an example/test Linux environment, that covers how to get started, what a full working example test setup can look like, and also include some best practice and operations advice along the way.…

Using Ceph with MySQL

Over the last year, the Ceph world drew me in. Partly because of my taste for distributed systems, but also because I think Ceph represents a great opportunity for MySQL specifically and databases in general. The shift from local storage to distributed storage is similar to the shift from bare disks host configuration to LVM-managed disks configuration.

Most of the work I’ve done with Ceph was in collaboration with folks from Red Hat (mainly Brent Compton and Kyle Bader). This work resulted in a number of talks presented at the Percona Live conference in April and the Red Hat Summit San Francisco at the end of June. I could write a lot about using Ceph with databases, and I hope this post …

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Webinar Thursday June 23: Choosing a MySQL High Availability Solution Today

Please join Percona, Technical Account Manager, Michael Patrick on Thursday, June 23, 2016 at 10 AM PDT (UTC-7) as he presents “Choosing a MySQL High Availability Solution Today.”

High availability (HA) is one of the solutions to improve performance, avoid data outages, and recover quickly from disasters. An HA environment helps guarantee that your database doesn’t have a single point of failure, accommodates rapid growth and exponentially increasing database size, and enables the applications that power your business.

Michael will discuss various topologies for achieving High Availability with MySQL.

Topics include:

  • Percona XtraDB Cluster
  • DRBD
  • MHA
  • MySQL Orchestrator

Each solution has advantages and …

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How We Made MySQL Great Again, or Upgrading MySQL with Orchestrator

In this blog post, we’ll discuss upgrading MySQL with Orchestrator.

I recently had a client, Life360, that wanted to upgrade from Percona Server 5.5 to Percona Server 5.6, and implement GTID in their high transaction environment. They had co-masters and multiple read slaves.

Orchestrator made this job much easier for us. My colleague, Tibi, recently posted about Orchestrator here and here.

Daniel from Life360 saw Orchestrator and was very interested. So here is how he setup Orchestrator in his own words:

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Docker MySQL Replication 101

In this blog post, we’ll discuss some of the basics regarding Docker MySQL replication. Docker has gained widespread popularity in recent years as a lightweight alternative to virtualization. It is ideal for building virtual development and testing environments. The solution is flexible and seamlessly integrates with popular CI tools.

 

This post walks through the setup of MySQL replication with Docker using Percona Server 5.6 images. To keep things simple we’ll configure a pair of instances and override only the most important variables for replication. You can add whatever other variables you want to override in the configuration files for each instance.

Note: the configuration described here is suitable for development or testing. We’ve also used the …

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How MaxScale monitors servers

In this post, we’ll address how MaxScale monitors servers. We saw in the

We saw in the previous post how we could deal with high availability (HA) and read-write split using MaxScale.

If you remember from the previous post, we used this section to monitor replication:

[Replication Monitor]
type=monitor
module=mysqlmon
servers=percona1, percona2, percona3
user=maxscale
passwd=264D375EC77998F13F4D0EC739AABAD4
monitor_interval=1000
script=/usr/local/bin/failover.sh
events=master_down

But what are we monitoring? We are monitoring the assignment of master and slave roles inside MaxScale according to the actual replication tree in the cluster using …

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High availability with asynchronous replication… and transparent R/W split

In this post, the first one of a Maxscale series, I describe how to use MariaDB’s MaxScale and MySQL-utilities with MySQL Asynchronous replication.

When we talk about high availability with asynchronous replication, we always think about MHA or PRM. But if we want to transparently use the slave(s) for READs, what can we use ?

Description:

  • Three MySQL servers, but one has very limited resources and will …
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