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Showing entries 1 to 30 of 861 Next 30 Older Entries

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MySQL Workbench 6.2.1 BETA has been released
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Dear MySQL Users,

The MySQL Workbench team is announcing availability of the first beta
release of its upcoming major product update, MySQL Workbench 6.2.

MySQL Workbench 6.2 focuses on support for innovations released in MySQL
5.6 and MySQL 5.7 DMR (Development Release) as well as MySQL Fabric 1.5,
with features such as:

* A new spatial data viewer, allowing graphical views of result sets
containing GEOMETRY data and taking advantage of the new GIS
capabilities in MySQL 5.7.
* Support for new MySQL 5.7.4 SQL syntax and configuration options.
* Metadata Locks View shows the locks connections are blocked or waiting
on.
* MySQL Fabric cluster connectivity – Browsing, view status, and connect
to any MySQL instance in a Fabric Cluster.
* MS Access migration Wizard – easily










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Upgrade MySQL to a new version with a fresh installation & use shell scripts and mysqldump to reload your data
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There are several ways to upgrade MySQL (http://mysql.com). In this post, we will use a combination of shell scripts and the mysqldump application to export our MySQL (http://mysql.com) data, and then re-import it back into the upgraded version of MySQL (http://mysql.com).

In this example, we will be doing a minor version upgrade. We will be going from 5.6.17 to 5.6.19. This method may not work if you are upgrading from one major release to another – from 5.1 to 5.5, or 5.5 to 5.6. You will want to check each version and review the new features/functions and also what features/functions have been deprecated. We are also assuming that no one will be using the database during the time it takes

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New! MySQL Utilities release-1.4.4 GA
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The MySQL Utilities Team is pleased to announce the latest GA release of MySQL Utilities, release-1.4.4. This release includes improvements in terms of usability, stability, security and an overall improvement regarding the comprehensibility of the provided error messages.

Improvements

The following highlights a few of the more significant improvements.

  • mysqlrpladmin errant transactions for switchover have been improved. Note : The errant transactions check requires all servers in the topology to have GTID’s enabled.
  • Failed MySQL server connection error messages now display the actual error returned from the failed connection.
  • Error messages that occur during automatic slave discovery (–discover-slaves-login) have been improved. Now the –verbose option generates specific information for each slave, including their
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New! MySQL Utilities Now Supports SSL and Configuration Files
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The MySQL Utilities Team is pleased to announce a new release that contains our newest features – SSL and configuration file support. These were added to release-1.5.0-alpha.

How can I make a secure connection to my server via Utilities?

Use the new SSL command-line options that are available for all utilities:

–ssl-ca : The path to a file that contains a list of trusted SSL certificate authorities.
–ssl-cert : The name of the SSL certificate file to use for establishing a secure connection.
–ssl-key : The name of the SSL key file to use for establishing a secure connection.

Then just specify the appropriate values on the command-line with any other parameters.

How can I use configuration files?

If typing all of those SSL options seems tedious, you can specify this



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MySQL Workbench 6.1.7 GA has been released
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Dear MySQL users,

The MySQL Workbench team announces availability of version 6.1.7 of its
flagship product. MySQL Workbench 6.1.7 is a periodic maintenance release
including 17 bug fixes. Additionally, the supported Linux distribution list has been
refreshed. Users of the product are recommended to upgrade to this version.

MySQL Workbench 6.1

With over 30 new features, this version has many significant
enhancements focusing on real-time performance assessment and analysis
from the SQL statement level to server internals and file IO. You can
see this from additions to the SQL Editor as well as new dashboard
visualization and reporting that take advantage of MySQL Server 5.6
and 5.7 Performance Schema, and enhancements to the MySQL Explain Plans.

Additionally Workbench 6.1 is leveraging work from









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MySQL backup and cleanup bash scripts with mydumper
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1. Backup script

#!/bin/sh
# Fri Jun 27 10:44:49 2014
# done by dragkh
# usage: 
# cat /etc/cron.d/backupmysql 
# 0  3  *  *  *       root    /root/bin/clean.backup.hyperion.mysql.mydumper.daily.sh >>  /var/log/clean.backup.${HOSTNAME}.mysql.mydumper.daily.log 2>&1
# 35  3  *  *  *       root    /root/bin/backup.hyperion.mysql.mydumper.daily.sh >> /var/log/backup.${HOSTNAME}.mysql.mydumper.daily.log 2>&1

ROOT_BACKUP_DIR="/home/mydumper"

seik_date () {
if [ -z $1 ]
then
# cdate=`date +%Y-%m-%d\ %H:%M:%S\ %Z`; export cdate; echo $cdate
cdate=`date -R`; export cdate; echo $cdate
else

if [ -z ${2} ]
then
cdate=`date +%Y-%m-%d.%H.%M.%S`; export cdate; echo $cdate
else
cdate=`date "+%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S"`; export cdate; echo $cdate
fi

fi
}


function check_dir {
 test ! -d
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On PostgreSQL. Interview with Bruce Momjian.
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“There are four things that motivate open source development teams:
1. The challenge/puzzle of programming, 2. Need for the software, 3. Personal advancement, 4. Belief in open source”
— Bruce Momjian.

On PostgreSQL and the challenges of motivating and managing open source teams, I have interviewed Bruce Momjian, Senior Database Architect at EnterpriseDB, and Co-founder of the PostgreSQL Global Development Group and Core Contributor.

RVZ

Q1. How did you manage to transform PostgreSQL from an abandoned academic project into a commercially viable, now enterprise relational database?


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Fabric Webinar with Andrew Morgan June 19th.
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MySQL Fabric – High Availability & Automated Sharding for MySQL

MySQL Fabric is built around an extensible and open source framework for managing farms of MySQL Servers. Currently two features have been implemented – High Availability (built on top of MySQL Replication) and scaling out using data sharding. These features can be used in isolation or in combination. MySQL Fabric aware connectors allow transactions and queries to be routed to the correct servers without the need for a proxy node, so operations run as quickly as ever. In this webinar you will learn what MySQL Fabric is, what it can achieve and how it is used – by DBAs, Dev-Ops and developers. You’ll also be exposed to what is happening under the covers.

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A New Home for Tungsten in the UK
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I was suitably heartened to hear about the new mine opening up in the Devon here in the UK to mine the element Tungsten.

I comment on this to my associates at Continuent, where comments were made by Csaba as to the appropriate quotes in the article:

“Tungsten is an extraordinary metal.”

“It’s almost as hard as a diamond and has one of the highest melting points of any mineral.”

“Adding a small amount to steel makes it far harder, far more resistant to stress and heat. The benefits to industry are obvious.”

Leading to him to suggest Adding a small amount of Tungsten to MySQL makes it far harder, far more resistant to stress and failures. The benefits to industry are obvious.

I

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Using MySQL Sandbox to setup a MySQL Fabric cluster in development
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With Fabric's official GA release this week, I thought I would post a spin on how to setup a development environment loosely based on the Fabric Quick Start guide in the manual.

The notable change, is the use of MySQL Sandbox for bootstrapping each of the MySQL instances.

Step 1: Install the MySQL Utilities + Python Connector

In my case, I downloaded:

The GUI install in both cases works as

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MySQL Enterprise Monitor 3.0: viewing Query Analyzer for 5.5.x servers.
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So, the good thing about MEM 3.0 is that it’s agentless, i.e. you don’t need an agent to use Query Analyzer data and see when performance is at it’s worst and dive into the offending SQL’s and explain plans to see what’s happening.

That’s great, however, sometimes it’s not always an easy road to migrate to 5.6 and even if you’re doing so, there’s nearly always a time when you want to continue viewing things in 5.5.x and compare performance between the 2.

The thing is, that in order to see the Explain Plans we need 5.6.14 or upwards (and setting “UPDATE performance_schema.setup_consumers SET enabled = ‘YES’ WHERE name = ‘events_statements_history_long’;” ).

So, here’s how to do it:

- Use the MEM 2.3 Agent &

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Introducing the MySQL High Availability Blog
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Welcome to the MySQL High Availability Blog. This blog is maintained by the High Availability team at Oracle to give our readers a bit of inside information regarding various topics around the MySQL high availability features.

MySQL 5.7 & Fabric in Sunnyvale May 22nd
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MySQL Fabric and 5.7 will be the topics of presentations this Thursday (5/22) at the Plug and Play Tech Center in Sunnyvale, California. Lee Stigile is presenting: What’s new in MySQL 5.7, and Sastry Vendantam is presenting MySQL Fabric.

Agenda is as follows:

5:00-5:30 Networking/Socialize over food and drinks
5:30-6:00 Lee will present MySQL 5.7
6:00-6:30 Sastry will present Fabric
6:30-7:00 Q&A and Socialize over food and drinks

Here is the link to register/RSVP

Plug and Play Tech Center
Thursday, May 22, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM (PDT)
440 N Wolfe Rd
Sunnyvale, CA 94085









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Triggers — MySQL 5.6 and 5.7
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MySQL Triggers are changing in 5.7 in a big way. Triggers have been around since 5.0 and have not changed much up to 5.6 but will gain the ability to have multiple triggers on the same event. Previously you had ONE trigger maximum on a BEFORE UPDATE, for example, and now you can have multiple triggers and set their order.

So what is a trigger? Triggers run either BEFORE or AFTER an UPDATE, DELETE, or INSERT is performed. You also get access to the OLD.col_name and NEW.col_name variables for the previous value and the newer value of the column.

So how do you use a trigger? Let say you are updating the price of an inventory item in a product database with a simple UPDATE statement. But you also want to track when the

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Re-factoring some internals of prepared statements in 5.7
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When the MySQL server receives a SELECT query, the query goes through several consecutive phases:

  • parsing: SQL words are recognized, the query is split into different parts following the SQL grammar rules: a list of selected expressions, a list of tables to read, a WHERE condition, …
  • resolution: the output of the parsing stage contains names of columns and names of tables. Resolution is about making sense out of this. For example, in “WHERE foo=3“, “foo” is a column name without a table name; by applying SQL name resolution rules, we discover the table who contains “foo” (it can be complicated if subqueries or outer joins are involved).
  • optimization: finding the best way to read tables: the best order of tables, and for each
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MySQL EXPLAIN Explained
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In years past, MySQL was a bit of a black box when it came to understanding what was happening and why. In MySQL 5.6 and 5.7, we’ve added many new features that provide much needed transparency and insight into the inner workings of MySQL. The single biggest feature was the new Performance Schema, but some other examples are:

  • The ability to see what query generated a row based binary log event.
  • The ability to see a tremendous amount of data points for InnoDB.
  • The ability to
  •   [Read more...]
    Interview with John Partridge, President & CEO of Tokutek, Inc.
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    “As the database gets used, shards can grow at an uneven rate and one shard might carry a majority of the load. MongoDB corrects this by balancing shards, but because of MongoDB’s lack of concurrency this operation can stall the database unacceptably.”–John Partridge.

    I have interviewed John Partridge, President & CEO of Tokutek, Inc.

    RVZ

    Q1. Tokutek recently announced to have eliminated performance issues of MongoDB sharding. What was the problem?

    John Partridge: The problem occurs after a shard is created. As the database gets used, shards can grow at an uneven rate and one shard might carry a majority of the load. MongoDB corrects this by balancing

      [Read more...]
    Slides from PLMCE 2014 breakout session
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    As many of you already know, PLMCE is an annual MySQL
    community conference and Expo organized by Percona in the month of April
    (usually). It is a great conference, not only to meet new and eminent people in
    MySQL and related database fields, but also to attend interesting talks, and
    also to give some.

    This year I spoke about synchronous replication at a higher level. The talk was
    titled “ACIDic Clusters: Review of current relational databases with synchronous replication”. Having previously given talks with boring titles (but





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    MySQL file limit, table cache and max_connections
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    MySQL variables open_files_limit, table_open_cache and max_connections are
    inter-related, and this is for obvious reasons: all deal with file descriptors
    one way or another.

    If one of the value is provided but others are left out, mysqld calculates
    others using a formula and in some cases, emits a warning if not possible.

    The whole calculation behind obtaining the final file descriptor limit is a bit
    byzantine and is as follows (for Linux):

    EDIT: This applies to MySQL 5.5, in 5.6, as Daniël in comments





      [Read more...]
    Use MySQL to store NoSQL and SQL data in the same database using memcached and InnoDB
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    MySQL (http://mysql.com) is a great relational database, but at some point someone (management) in your company is probably going to say that they need to use NoSQL to store their data. After all, NoSQL is one of the latest buzzwords, so it must be good (correct?). Basically, NoSQL allows you to store data without all of the characteristics of a relational database. A very simple explanation is that you are storing all of a data set with just one primary key, and the primary key is how you also retrieve the data. While NoSQL may be good in some cases, it is hard to beat “old-fashioned” SQL relational databases – especially if that is what you know. But, with MySQL and InnoDB, you can have the best of both worlds.

      [Read more...]
    Using mysqldump and the MySQL binary log – a quick guide on how to backup and restore MySQL databases
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    Be sure to check out my other posts on mysqldump:
    Scripting Backups of MySQL with Perl via mysqldump
    Splitting a MySQL Dump File Into Smaller Files Via Perl
    Creating and restoring database backups with mysqldump and MySQL Enterprise Backup – Part 1 of 2
    Creating and restoring database



      [Read more...]
    MySQL Partitioning – A Quick Look at Partitioning – Separate Your Data for Faster Searches
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    In MySQL (http://mysql.com), partitioning is a way to separate the data in one table into smaller “sub-tables” for better query performance and data management.

    For example, let’s say that you have a database containing numerous accounting transactions. You could just store all of these transactions in one table, but you only need to keep seven year’s worth of data for tax purposes. Instead of placing all of the data in one table, and then deleting the old data from that table, you could split the table into partitions with each partition representing one year’s worth of data.

    Then, after seven years, you could delete/drop the old partition. Partitions are flexible, as you can add, drop, redefine, merge, or split existing partitions (there are other options on what

      [Read more...]
    Congratulations, Ubuntu!
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    Today, we congratulate our friends at Ubuntu on a great new release, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. As you can see in Mark Shuttleworth’s posting on Google+ from a few weeks back, MySQL has been cooperating closely with the Debian and Ubuntu communities to make sure that MySQL works very well on these platforms, and Ubuntu 14.04 […]
    MySQL Enterprise Backup 3.10: Teasing compression.
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    Ok, so I wanted to look into the new compression options of MEB 3.10.

    And I would like to share my tests with you. Remember, they’re just this, tests, so please feel free to copy n paste and obtain your own results and conclusions, and should I say it, baselines, in order to compare future behaviour, on your own system.

    An Oracle Linux 6.3 virtual machine with 3Gb RAM, 2 virtual threads, on a 1x quad core, windows laptop. Not pretty, but hey.

    So, these tests are solely about backup. I’ll do restore when I get some *more* time.

     

    First up, lets compare like with like, i.e. MEB version 3.9 & 3.10:

    Let’s make this interesting, hence, want to use as much resources available as possible, read, write, process threads and number of buffers.

    mysqlbackup --user=root --password=oracle
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    MySQL Enterprise Backup 3.10: Teasing compression.
    Employee +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    Ok, so I wanted to look into the new compression options of MEB 3.10.

    And I would like to share my tests with you. Remember, they’re just this, tests, so please feel free to copy n paste and obtain your own results and conclusions, and should I say it, baselines, in order to compare future behaviour, on your own system.

    An Oracle Linux 6.3 virtual machine with 3Gb RAM, 2 virtual threads, on a 1x quad core, windows laptop. Not pretty, but hey.

    So, these tests are solely about backup. I’ll do restore when I get some *more* time.

     

    First up, lets compare like with like, i.e. MEB version 3.9 & 3.10:

    Let’s make this interesting, hence, want to use as much resources available as possible, read, write, process threads and number of buffers.

    mysqlbackup --user=root --password=oracle
      [Read more...]
    A new dimension to MySQL query optimizations – part 2
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    This is “A new dimension to MySQL query optimizations – part 2″. If you didn’t read part 1 already I suggest you skim through it before reading on.

    To summarize, the problem at hand is this: Given a query with a join between two or more tables, the MySQL optimizer’s mission is to find the best combination of join order and access method so that the response time becomes as low as possible. The optimizer does this by calculating the cost of each combination and then picks the cheapest one.

    Consider the following query:

    SELECT *
    FROM employee JOIN department ON employee.dept_no=department.dept_no
    WHERE employee.first_name="John" AND
          employee.hire_date BETWEEN "2012-01-01" AND "2012-06-01"

    The

      [Read more...]
    Performance_schema success stories : replication SQL thread tuning
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    A lot of customers have lagging slaves. It could be one of the top issues at support, due to the infamous row based replication without primary key issue :

    Bug #53375 RBR + no PK => High load on slave (table scan/cpu) => slave failure

    If you use binlog_format = statement or mixed ,  there are several ways of monitoring the SQL thread. The most ancient is the log-slow-slave-statements  variable. From 5.6.11, it is a dynamic variable, before that you had to restart the slave mysqld to enable it.

    Once on, you can trace what’s going on in the SQL thread and analyze the slow query log. Of course, as the SQL thread could be running long write

      [Read more...]
    MySQL Workbench 6.1.3 RC has been released
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    The MySQL developer tools team announces 6.1.3 RC – the final release candidate for MySQL Workbench 6.1.

    MySQL Workbench 6.1 is the upcoming major update for the official MySQL graphical development tool.
    Introducing over 30 new features, this version has many significant enhancement focusing on real-time performance assessment and analysis from the SQL statement level to server internals and file IO. You’ll see this in additions to the SQL Editor as well as new dashboard visualization and reporting that takes advantage of MySQL Server 5.6 and 5.7 Performance Schema, and enhancements to the MySQL Explain Plans.

    Additionally Workbench 6.1 is leveraging work from various teammates in MySQL Engineering by introducing a schema called “SYS” that provides simplified views on Performance Schema, Information Schema, and


      [Read more...]
    innodb_flush_logs_on_trx_commit and Galera Cluster
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    We deploy Galera Cluster (in MariaDB) for some clients, and innodb_flush_logs_on_trx_commit is one of the settings we’ve been playing with. The options according to the manual:

    • =0 don’t write or flush at commit, write and flush once per second
    • =1 write and flush at trx commit
    • =2 write log, but only flush once per second

    The flush (fsync) refers to the mechanism the filesystem uses to try and guarantee that written data is actually on the physical medium/device and not just in a buffer (of course cached RAID controllers, SANs and other devices use some different logic there, but it’s definitely written beyond the OS space).

    In a non-cluster setup, you’d always want it to be =1 in order to be ACID compliant and that’s also InnoDB’s default. So far so good. For cluster setups,

      [Read more...]
    Performance_schema success stories : host summary tables
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    This question was asked at support by a customer to solve a difficult issue.

    How to identify a sporadic burst of queries coming from one of the hosts accessing the database ?

    If there are hundreds of hosts, it can be challenging, especially if the queries are fast. No chance for them to get logged in the famous slow query log !

    Here is the solution using the performance_schema in MySQL 5.6 :

    SELECT
    host,
    SUM(essbben.count_star) AS total_statements,
    format_time(SUM(essbben.sum_timer_wait)) AS total_latency,
    format_time(SUM(essbben.sum_timer_wait) / SUM(count_star))
    AS avg_latency
    FROM
    performance_schema.events_statements_summary_by_host_by_event_name essbben
    GROUP BY
    host
    ORDER BY
    SUM(sum_timer_wait) DESC;

    Here is the result

      [Read more...]
    Showing entries 1 to 30 of 861 Next 30 Older Entries

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