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Displaying posts with tag: storage (reset)

Storage caching options in Linux 3.9 kernel
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dm-cache is (albeit still classified “experimental”) is in the just released Linux 3.9 kernel. It deals with generic block devices and uses the device mapper framework. While there have been a few other similar tools flying around, since this one has been adopted into the kernel it looks like this will be the one that you’ll be seeing the most in to the future. It saves sysadmins the hassle of compiling extra stuff for a system.

A typical use is for an SSD to cache a HDD. Similar to a battery backed RAID controller, the objective is to insulate the application from latency caused by the mechanical device, the most laggy part of which is seek time (measured in milliseconds). Giventhe  relatively high storage capacity of an SSD (in the hundreds of GBs), this allows you to mostly disregard the mechanical latency for writes and that’s very useful for

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The “Big Data” buzzword finally gets a real definition
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We’ve all heard the term “Big Data” thrown around a fair amount in the last several years ever since the rise of Hadoop and other distributed storage methods. But defining “Big Data” has always been a subjective term that hinges on perspective; what one engineer considers big can be vastly different than another’s.

However, there’s finally a definite description that says Big Data no matter what perspective you operate from: “That facility by my calculations that I submitted to the court for the Electronic Frontiers Foundation against NSA would hold on the order of 5 zettabytes of data. Just that current storage capacity is being advertised on the web that you can buy. And that’s not talking about what they have in the near future.” You can read more about the facility and its purpose here:

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The blog was down yesterday
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The brief outage was due to a scheduled move of the servers to a separate rack and subnet dedicated to our work with the Center for Information Assurance & Cybersecurity (ciac) at the University of Washington Bothell (uwb), and a11y.com

I am currently exercising the new (to us) equipment and hope to winnow the less than awesome equipment over the next quarter. I spent the last six months finding the best in breed of the surplussed DL385 and DL380 chassis we (work) were going to have recycled. The team and I were able to find enough equipment to bring up one of each with eight and six gigs of memory, respectively. These will make excellent hypervisors for provisioning embedded instances of Slackware, Fedora, RHEL, CentOS, Debian, FreeBSD, OpenSolaris, OpenIndiana, FreeDOS, etc.

When I initially configured this xen paravirt environment, I failed to plan for integration with libvirt, so I am

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Amazon EC2 now powered by high performance storage (benchmark)
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A while ago I had a discussion with someone about the future of server infrastructure. Among other things, we were wondering whether companies will continue to run on dedicated servers or if eventually everyone just ends up in a Cloud environment. During the discussion I raised a point that in principle Cloud is a great idea that will keep attracting more and more people, but it is missing one important piece that stops many from using it – a high performance storage. Apparently, this has just changed.

Yesterday I received an e-mail announcing a new EC2 instance type – hi1.4xlarge. It features 16 logical CPUs (35 ECUs), 60GB of RAM, and… two 1TB SSD-based disk volumes! These are great specs that should work for nearly any database. Even assuming someone has a MySQL database larger than 2TB, not all tables will

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MySQL on S3: performance with storage located across the continent
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Can OLTP database workloads use Amazon S3 as primary storage? Now they can, thanks to the Cloud Storage Engine (ClouSE), but the question is: how fast?


To answer the question about performance, we decided to run db_STRESS benchmark on a MySQL database in Amazon EC2.  We compared 3 configurations:

  • “Across the street storage”: ClouSE with data stored in S3 in the same region (US Standard)
  • “Across

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Running out of disk space on MySQL partition? A quick rescue.
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No space left on device – this can happen to anyone. Sooner or later you may face the situation where a database either has already or is only minutes away from running out of disk space. What many people do in such cases, they just start looking for semi-random things to remove – perhaps a backup, a few older log files, or pretty much anything that seems redundant. However this means acting under a lot of stress and without much thinking, so it would be great if there was a possibility to avoid that. Often there is. Or what if there isn’t anything to remove?

While xfs is usually the recommended filesystem for a MySQL data partition on Linux, the extended filesystem family continues to be very popular as it is used as default in all major Linux distributions. There is a feature

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Now available: Slides from Percona Live and Linuxcon Europe
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The slides from last week’s talks I (co-)presented at Percona Live and Linuxcon Europe are now available from our web site.

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Got open source cloud storage? Red Hat buys Gluster
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Red Hat’s $136m acquisition of open source storage vendor Gluster marks Red Hat’s biggest buy since JBoss and starts the fourth quarter with a very intersting deal. The acquisition is definitely good for Red Hat since it bolsters its Cloud Forms IaaS and OpenShift PaaS technology and strategy with storage, which is often the starting point for enterprise and service provider cloud computing deployments. The acquisition also gives Red Hat another weapon in its fight against VMware, Microsoft and others, including OpenStack, of which Gluster is a member (more on that further down). The deal is also good for Gluster given the sizeable price Red Hat is paying for the provider of open source, software-based, scale-out storage for unstructured data and also as validation of both open source and software in

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zfs FileSystem and MySQL
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ZFS is a new kind of 128-bit file system that provides simple administration, transactional semantics, end-to-end data integrity, and immense scalability. ZFS is not an incremental improvement to existing technology; it is a fundamentally new approach to data management. ZFS was first introduced in Solaris in 2004 and it is a default filesystem in OpenSolaris, but Linux ports are underway, Apple is shipping it in OS X 10.5 Leopard with limited zfs capability ( Apple shutdown this project afterward due to some known reason), and it will be included in FreeBSD 7.


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RE: A bit on SANs and system dependencies
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This is a reply on A bit on SANs and system dependencies by Eric Bergen.

Lets first start by making a difference between entry level, midrange and high-end SAN's.

Entry level:
This is basically a bunch of disks with a network connection. The Oracle/Sun/StorageTek 2540 is an example for this category. This storage is aimed at lowcost shared storage.

Midrange:
This kind of storage generally features replication and more disks than entry level. HP EVA is what comes to mind for this category. This storage is aimed at a good price/performance.

High-End:
This is mainframe style storage which is made usable for open systems. Hitachi Data Systems VSP is a good example of this category. This category is for










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