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Showing entries 1 to 27

Displaying posts with tag: databasejournal (reset)

DBJ – MySQL Character Sets
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In our latest article at Database Journal we talk about Character Sets in MySQL.  What are they?  How do they affect searching?  How do they affect data that is inserted or updated?  How can I set and control the for an application or globally in my database?  And what pre-tell is collation?  We answer all these questions and more.

Database Journal – Understanding MySQL Character Sets

DBJ: MySQL Benchmarking
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Benchmarking is liking running your system through it’s paces.  You don’t know how fast your software and hardware are until you’ve put some pressure on them.  Benchmarking tools allow you to do just that.  We use sysbench to look at the operating system and mysqlslap to run queries in the MySQL database.

Database Journal – MySQL Server Benchmarking 101

DBJ: Inside MySQL Binary Logs
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MySQL’s binary logs are an important part of a properly functioning database.  They facility point-in-time recovery, and allow replication to operation.  We dig into these files, and look at what’s inside them, and how they work.

An Inside Look at the MySQL Binary Log Files

DBJ – Mult-master MySQL Improves Manageability
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Multi-master MySQL, with the MMM management software brings a whole host of new features, and manageability to your MySQL deployments.   Run backups, alter tables, perform upgrades all without slowing down your production users.

Read more at Database Journal – Using Multi-master MySQL To Get A Leg Up On Database Performance

DBJ: Introduction to Multi-Master MySQL
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This month on Database Journal we talk about multi-master MySQL using circular replication to achieve high availability.

Read more at DatabaseJournal – Intro to Multi-Master MySQL

DBJ – Wonders of Maatkit for MySQL
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If you’re new to the MySQL DBA role, you’ll be excited to learn about the Maatkit toolset.  It provides a whole host of valuable functionality and fills many of the DBAs day-to-day needs.

DatabaseJournal – Wonders of Maatkit

DBJ – Exotic Storage Engines for MySQL
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In our March DBJ article we talked about some of the storage engines to choose from with MySQL.  With it’s plugin storage engine architecture, you have a range of options.  In our April article we continue to discuss a further selection of storage engines, and what features they offer to the DBA and database architect.

Database Journal – Exotic Storage Engines

Surveying MySQL’s Popular Storage Engines
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In this month’s Database Journal piece we look at the spectrum of MySQL storage engines available, and examine what some of their strengths and weaknesses are.

View the article here: Survey of MySQL Storage Engines

DBJ – Heartbeat Setup
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In the last of our three part series on MySQL high availability we discuss the Linux Heartbeat project, and how it can be used to automate failover between two MySQL databases.

Heartbeat exposes a virtual IP address for use by the database, and manages it as well.  In the event that one server becomes unavailable, Heartbeat will  revoke primary control of DRBD from that node, hand over the IP address to the alternate node, mount the DRBD device, and start MySQL.  MySQL’s InnoDB engine will then perform crash recovery, rollback uncommitted transactions, and startup.

Read the full article at Database Journal – DRBD & MySQL, Heartbeat Setup

DBJ: DRBD & Virtualbox Setup
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In part two of our article on DRBD and High Availability, we take you step-by-step through setting up Sun’s Virtualbox software, creating a couple of VMs, and then installing CentOS on those.  These two virtual Linux boxes then serve as two nodes in our DRBD mirrored disk setup which we use as a platform to install MySQL.

DRBD, MySQL and the Virtualbox Setup – Database Journal

Keep on the lookout for our third part in the series next month.  In that issue we’ll explain how the Linux Heartbeat project can be used to control the whole setup, and provide automatic failover in the event that one node goes down.

DBJ: DRBD Makes Excellent Low-cost HA Soln for MySQL
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With all the trouble keeping MySQLs built-in replication running, some folks are looking for alternatives.  DRBD provides a distributed block level device, which can provide the sort of database mirroring we need, below the filesystem.  That makes it transparent to MySQL, but nevertheless a great complimentary solution.  In this article we’ll discuss the pros and cons, and then part two will take you step by step through a basic setup.

Read the article on Database Journal – DRBD and MySQL – Excellent Low-cost HA Solution

DBJ: Scaling Faster & Stronger MySQL
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Sometimes terms like scaling are – as the brits like to say – bandied about, without everyone agreeing on what they mean.  That’s because scaling is an insiders term, a technical term thought to carry great weight, but nevertheless often misunderstood.So I wanted to write an article about this interesting and important topic, while sticking to terms that everyone *can* agree on.  This is the first in a two part series where I discuss various ways to make your database scale.  But I talk in terms of faster, stronger, bigger and better because I think we can all agree that’s what we’re really trying to achieve! Database Journal:  Faster & Stronger MySQL 

DBJ: 7 Ways To Crash a Database
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With a tongue in cheek, humorous tone, we turn the tables upside down on database best practices, illustrating all of the things you shouldn’t do, and what might happen if you ignore those important tasks.

 7 Ways To Crash A Database

DBJ: Five More Dials To Turn
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In this month’s article over at Database Journal  we discuss more areas to tune your initial MySQL database setup including InnoDB & MyISAM buffers, hit ratios, index usage and full table scans, security, and logs.  With this second article in a two part series we complete our coverage of basic tuning of a MySQL database.

MySQL: Five More Dials To Turn

DBJ – Ten Dials To Set
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This month in Database Journal we start a two part article on tuning the dials of your new MySQL database.  After you install and setup your first database, you’ll need to set various parameters in your my.cnf file.  These control memory, logfiles, temp table usage, sorting, joins, and a whole lot more.  We’ll review some of the more important wants and start you on your way to more nuanced tuning of your MySQL instance.

Read the article: Ten Dials To Set at DatabaseJournal.com

DBJ: Getting Started With MySQL Clustering
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If you haven’t worked with MySQL’s NDB Cluster storage engine yet, now is the time to take a peek.  There is a sandbox available from serveral nines, which can be installed fairly quickly.  This new article over at DatabaseJournal, MySQL Clustering In A Sandbox will have you up and running in no time.

DBJ: Five Query Optimizations in MySQL
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A new article is up on Database Journal where I discuss some query optimizations that work well with MySQL applications.Five Query Optimizations in MySQL 

DBJ: Optimizing the MySQL Query Cache
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The MySQL Query Cache is a powerful piece of engineering that users of the popular open source database can take advantage of to speed up throughput of their applications.  MySQL’s cache operates a little bit differently from other database engines.  It does not just cache query plans, but the query data as well.  What this means is that the size and number of queries that your database manages will be variables when tuning the query cache.  We discuss all of these items in our new article at DatabaseJournal.

Database Journal – Optimizing the MySQL Query Cache

DBJ: Optimizing the MySQL Query Cache
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The MySQL Query Cache is a powerful piece of engineering that users of the popular open source database can take advantage of to speed up throughput of their applications.  MySQL’s cache operates a little bit differently from other database engines.  It does not just cache query plans, but the query data as well.  What this means is that the size and number of queries that your database manages will be variables when tuning the query cache.  We discuss all of these items in our new article at DatabaseJournal.

Database Journal - Optimizing the MySQL Query Cache

DBJ – Advanced MySQL Replication – Improving Performance
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 Our latest article over at Database Journal is hot off the presses.  Advanced MySQL Replication – Improving Performance discusses some of the best ways to improve the performance of your MySQL slave setup.  If the slave is constantly getting further and further behind the master database, we discuss a number of techniques which may help you bring it under control.

DBJ: Reliable MySQL Replication
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Part II in our series on MySQL picks up where we left off from talking about some of the challenges, and potential issues and problems that come up with MySQL replication after you have it setup and running for some time. DBJ: Fixing MySQL Replication

In this piece we talk about some of the ways to verify your setup, and make sure your slave does not drift out of sync with the master, and to alert you if it does.

DBJ: Replication Pitfalls
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In this month’s Database Journal article  we write about Replication Pitfalls with MySQL.

Replication is fairly straightforward to setup, however your slave databases can get out of sync, or throw errors.  We investigate some of the reasons why, and help you identify those before they come back to bite you!

DBJ: Intro to PHP + Oracle
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If you’re already building LAMP applications (linux/apache/mysql/php), and you’re looking to port them to Oracle, or you’re new to this technology stack, and you want to use Oracle as your database, this article is for you.  We cover the basics of gettings started, and where to look for more information.

Intro to PHP + Oracle - Database Journal - Aug 14, 2008

DBJ: Useful PL/SQL Packages
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In our latest database journal piece, we cover some useful Oracle-supplied pl/sql stored procedures to help you instrument and debug your code, dump metadata descriptions of your database objects (a la MySQL dump –no-rows) and much more.

Take a look at  DBA Insider - Useful PL/SQL Packages.

Migrating From MySQL To Oracle
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Our two part article on migrating a MySQL database to Oracle features in Database Journal in January and February of this year.  Take a look and please post your comments!

Migrating From MySQL To Oracle - Part I

Migrating From MySQL To Oracle - Part II

DBJ: Oracle, MySQL + Postgres Compared Part II
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In Part II in this series, I talk about how these three databases compare in some particularly crucial areas.

For instance how do the optimizers of these different database engines behave, and why does that matter?  What type of indexes are available, particularly with respect to typical applications.  I then move on to datatypes available and which are missing.  You’ll find some surprises here.

Lastly the holy grail of any modern relational database, I discuss transactional support. Relevant concepts include ACID compliance, read-only versus insert and update activity, and so on.

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DBJ: Oracle, MySQL, Postgres Compared
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If you’re interested in how these three databases measure up in terms of feature sets, take a look at part one in a two part series I wrote over at Database Journal.

I discuss stored procedures, views, materialized views or snapshots, triggers, and security. Stored procedures and functions are supported on all three databases, as are views and triggers. Although MySQL and Postgres aren’t there in terms of default snapshot support, there are ways to get that functionality in a somewhat roundabout way.

Security is always a tricky question, as all the bugs out there aren’t always publicized. It’s sort of a cat and mouse game. All three databases support user based authentication to login to the database, and various privilege levels to

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Showing entries 1 to 27

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