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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 91 to 100 of 776 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys
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Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight: Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys. This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows itself as contention on the InnoDB dict_sys mutex. Now the dict_sys mutex controls access to the data dictionary. This mutex is used at various important places throughout the InnoDB code and as such any contention on the dict_sys mutex is going to have a InnoDB system-wide negative affect.

The post InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys appeared first on ovais.tariq.

InnoDB scalability issues due to tables without primary keys
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Each day there is probably work done to improve performance of the InnoDB storage engine and remove bottlenecks and scalability issues. Hence there was another one I wanted to highlight:

Scalability issues due to tables without primary keys

This scalability issue is caused by the usage of tables without primary keys. This issue typically shows itself as contention on the InnoDB dict_sys mutex. Now the dict_sys mutex controls access to the data dictionary. This mutex is used at various places. I will only mention a few of them:

  • During operations such as opening and closing table handles, or
  • When accessing I_S tables, or
  • During undo of a freshly inserted row, or
  • During other data dictionary modification operations such as CREATE TABLE, or
  • Within the “Persistent Stats” subsystem,
  [Read more...]
Converting an OLAP database to TokuDB, part 3: operational stuff
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This is the third post in a series of posts describing our experience in migrating a large DWH server to TokuDB (see 1st and 2nd parts). This post discusses operations; namely ALTER TABLE operations in TokuDB. We ran into quite a few use cases by this time that we can shed light on.

Quick recap: we've altered one of out DWH slaves to TokuDB, with the goal of migrating most of out servers, including the master, to TokuDB.

Adding an index

Shortly after migrating our server to TokuDB we noticed an unreasonably disproportionate slave lag on our TokuDB slave (red line in chart below) as compared to other slaves.

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Introducing TokuMX Clustering Indexes for MongoDB
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Since introducing TokuMX, we’ve discussed benefits that TokuMX has for existing MongoDB applications that require no changes. In this post, I introduce an extension we’ve made to the indexing API: clustering indexes, a tool that can tremendously improve query performance. If I were to speak to someone about clustering indexes, I think the conversation could go something like this…

What is a Clustering Index?

A clustering index is an index that stores the entire document, not just the defined key.

A common example is

  [Read more...]
Making full table scan 10x faster in InnoDB
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At MySQL Connect 2013, I talked about how we used MySQL 5.6 at Facebook, and explained some of new features we added to our Facebook MySQL 5.6 source tree. In this post, I'm going to talk about how we made full table scan faster in InnoDB.

Faster full table scan in InnoDB

 In general, almost all queries from applications are using indexes, and reading very few rows (0..1 on primary key lookups and 0..hundreds on range scans). But sometimes we run full table scans. Typical full table scan examples are logical backups (mysqldump) and online schema changes (SELECT ... INTO OUTFILE).

 We take logical backups by mysqldump at Facebook. As you know MySQL offers both physical and logical backup commands/utilities. Logical backup has some advantages against



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Inexpensive SSDs for Database Workloads
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The cost of SSDs has been dropping rapidly, and at the time of this writing, 2.5-drives have reached the 1TB capacity mark.  You can actually get inexpensive drives for as little as 60 cents per GB. Even inexpensive SSDs can perform tens of thousands of IOPs and come with 1.5M – 2M hous MTBF and a 5-year warranty: check out the Intel SC S3500 specs as an example. There is however one important factor you need to take into account when considering  SSDs as opposed to conventional hard drives – Write Endurance.

Many of us have heard about SSDs having limits in terms of how many writes SSDs can handle, many however assume this is what is already

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InnoDB Temporary Tables just got faster
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It all started with a goal to make InnoDB temporary tables more effective. Temporary table semantics are blessed with some important characteristics that can help us simplify lot of operations.

  • Temporary tables are not visible across connections
  • Temporary tables lifetime is limited to connection lifetime (unless user explicitly drops it).

What does this means in to InnoDB ?

  • REDO logging can be avoided for temporary tables and related objects since temporary tables do not survive a shutdown or crash.
  • Temporary table definitions can be maintained in-memory without persisting to the disk.
  • Locking constraints can be relaxed since only one client can see these tables.
  • Change buffering can be avoided since the
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InnoDB 5.7 performance improvements
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A quick overview of the InnoDB performance improvements for both read-only and read-write loads.
It's all about bugs fixed: MySQL 5.6.14
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Most of MySQL gurus and famous users are probably in San Francisco now, getting ready for fun at MySQL Connect. Part of that fun should come from the announcement of great new MySQL 5.6.14 release (that somewhat silently happened yesterday).

I am sitting at home though and I've seen at best 3 sunny days in September. The rest of the time it rains, so hardly I can do anything more funny and useful than review of MySQL bug reports even during my weekend. Let me try to tell you what MySQL 5.6.14 is really about and what you should expect from it based on the list of bugs fixed. Please, do not blame me if my summary would be different from the upcoming keynotes at MySQL Connect. It rains here...


I'll use good old approach of checking my older posts




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InnoDB Redundant Row Format
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Introduction

This article describes the InnoDB redundant row format. If you are new to InnoDB code base (a new developer starting to work with InnoDB), then this article is for you. I'll explain the row format by making use of a gdb session. An overview of the article is given below:

  • Create a simple table and populate few rows.
  • Access the page that contains the rows inserted.
  • Access a couple of rows and explain its format.
  • Give summary of redundant row format.
  • Useful gdb commands to analyse the InnoDB rows.
  • Look at a GNU Emacs Lisp function to traverse rows in an InnoDB index page.

To get the most out of this article, the reader is expected to repeat the gdb session as described here.

The Schema

Consider the

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10 Newer Entries Showing entries 91 to 100 of 776 10 Older Entries

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