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Displaying posts with tag: General (reset)
MySQL datamasking using ProxySQL

Percona Live Amsterdam is just finished… there was an entire room full day about MySQL 8.0 which is wonderful but there was also another product that everybody was talking about: ProxySQL (great job René).

Ronald Bradford and the MySQL engineering team were discussing about what tool was missing in the MySQL ecosystem and Mark Leith highlighted that a datamasking utility was really missing.

Having used already ProxySQL for Group Replication and other tests, I knew that it would be possible to use it also for this purpose. After a very short discussion and a nightly chat with …

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HA with MySQL Group Replication and ProxySQL

After having played with MySQL Group Replication and HAProxy, it’s time to show you how easy it’s to setup MySQL HA with ProxySQL.

ProxySQL is a high performance open source proxy for MySQL. It has many features that invite you to discover on and on github.

If you remember, I wrote in my last post that it is recommended to use Group Replication with only one WRITER group member. As it is the preferred architecture, I will show you how to achieve this using ProxySQL. With ProxySQL, you don’t need to have two different interfaces to split reads and writes.

In fact, when you use ProxySQL, you have a much larger amount of options to route your queries. In production, the smart DBA, will identify …

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MySQL Group Replication Beta 0.8 is out !

As announced by Luis Soares on MySQL High Availability’s blog, a new labs version of Group Replication (GR) has been released for MySQL 5.7.14 !

Group Replication is the main component of the future MySQL HA solution. Even if with GR, it’s possible to write simultaneously on all the member of the group, GR doesn’t provide any write scaling. Indeed, if one member reached 100% of its write capabilities, adding writes to another member, won’t help as both will have to write their load AND the load from the other member: remember this is (virtual) synchronous replication, all writes happening on member A will happen on member B and on all other members of the group.

As you …

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New in MariaDB Connector/C 3.0 – Part I: SSL

New SSL alternatives SSL connections in previous versions of MariaDB Connector/C based on the OpenSSL library. The OpenSSL heartbleed bug, licensing problems and the lack of supporting different transport layers were the main reasons that we decided to offer SSL alternatives. In addition to OpenSSL the following SSL libraries are supported in Connector/C 3.0: GnuTLS […]

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The State of SSL in MariaDB

Usually when one says “SSL” or “TLS” it means not a specific protocol but a family of protocols. Wikipedia article has the details, but in short — SSL 2.0 and SSL 3.0 are deprecated and should not be used anymore (the well-known POODLE vulnerability exploits the flaw in SSL 3.0). TLS 1.0 is sixteen years […]

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MariaDB Talks at Percona Live Data Performance Conference 2016

The Percona Live Data Performance Conference 2016 isn’t until 18-21 April 2016, but community voting is now open. So if you’re going, and want to see lots of MariaDB talks, please click on the buttons below and vote! You have to be logged in to the Percona site to vote. Once logged in, scroll to […]

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InnoDB holepunch compression vs the filesystem in MariaDB 10.1

InnoDB holepunch experiments After excellent blogs by Mark Callaghan (see links below), I decided to use some of my time to experiment how different filesystems behave if the holepunch feature is used in MariaDB 10.1. First of all, MariaDB 10.1 does not use holepunch by default even if a table is page compressed (a term […]

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MariaDB Connector/J failover support – case Amazon Aurora

MariaDB Connector/J has evolved a lot during the year. In this post I will talk about the failover capabilities in the connector and give some guidance on how to use them in some certain cases. One other important new feature that I’ll cover in a later article is the fact that MariaDB Connector/J can do […]

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Track and Optimize Server Connection Methods

The MySQL server supports a variety of client connection methods. To summarize: you have TCP/IP (v4 and v6) on all OSes (with or without TLS/SSL encryption), Unix Domain Sockets on Unix/Linux, and Named Pipes and/or Shared Memory on Windows.

Each of these connection methods has its own set of pros and cons: speed, security, portability, and ease-of-use.…

MariaDB: InnoDB foreign key constraint errors


A foreign key is a field (or collection of fields) in one table that uniquely identifies a row of another table. The table containing the foreign key is called the child table, and the table containing the candidate key is called the referenced or parent table. The purpose of the foreign key is to identify a particular row of the referenced table. Therefore, it is required that the foreign key is equal to the candidate key in some row of the primary table, or else have no value (the NULL value). This is called a referential integrity constraint between the two tables. Because violations of these constraints can be the source of many database problems, most database management systems provide mechanisms to ensure that every non-null foreign key corresponds to a row of the referenced table. Consider following simple example:

create table parent (
    id int not null primary key,
    name char(80)
) …
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