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Displaying posts with tag: vmstat (reset)
new to pstop – vmstat style stdout interface

In November last year I announced a program I wrote called pstop. I hope that some of you have tried it and found it useful. Certainly I know that colleagues and friends use it and it has proved helpful when trying to look inside MySQL to see what it is doing. A recent suggestion provoked me … Continue reading new to pstop – vmstat style stdout interface

Optimizing MySQL Performance: Choosing the Right Tool for the Job

Next Wednesday, I will present a webinar about MySQL performance profiling tools that every MySQL DBA should know.

Application performance is a key aspect of ensuring a good experience for your end users. But finding and fixing performance bottlenecks is difficult in the complex systems that define today’s web applications. Having a method and knowing how to use the tools available can significantly reduce the amount of time between problems manifesting and fixes being deployed.

In the webinar, titled “Optimizing MySQL Performance: Choosing the Right Tool for the Job,” we’ll start with the basic top, iostat, and vmstat then move onto advanced tools like GDB, Oprofile, and Strace.

I’m looking forward to this webinar and invite you to join us April 16th at 10 a.m. Pacific time. You can learn more and also  …

[Read more]
Does "mpstat" can replace "vmstat" ?

I prefer to say right now, the answer is no !
However, mpstat can provide a minimum service to show essentials information about your CPU usage :

Show usage for all CPU (every 1s) : mpstat 1

Show usage for CPU number 2 (every 1s) : mpstat -P 2 1

It’s possible to retrieve CPU load (user/sys) and IO waits via a simple interface.
And I like the opportunity to focus on a single CPU. It can be a usefull tool for monitoring and scripting.

But there isn’t any information about the run queue processes and this is the bad news here !

So, let me know if you’ve used this tool, all comments are welcome.

[Read more]
Does mpstat can replace vmstat ?

I prefer to say right now, the answer is no !
However, mpstat can provide a minimum service to show essentials information about your CPU usage :

Show usage for all CPU (every 1s) : mpstat 1

Show usage for CPU number 2 (every 1s) : mpstat -P 2 1

It’s possible to retrieve CPU load (user/sys) and IO waits via a simple interface.
And I like the opportunity to focus on a single CPU. It can be a usefull tool for monitoring and scripting.

But there isn’t any information about the run queue processes and this is the bad news here !

So, let me know if you’ve used this tool, all comments are welcome.

Related Posts :

[Read more]
MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners

This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

Let's start by the fundamentals.

Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available to the application depends on the number of processors on the server, the number of …

[Read more]
MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners

This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

Let's start by the fundamentals.

Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available to the application depends on the number of processors on the server, the number of …

[Read more]
MySQL scalability: diagnostic for beginners

This past week I have been working with 2 Web2.0 startups - members of Sun Startup Essentials, they get the support for free - that are looking at improving the response time of their web site.

We've been working at understanding how they servers behave today and what could prevent their application to scale, which led me to show how to run a quick diagnostic on an existing system and to restate some key fundamentals in terms of scalability.

Let's start by the fundamentals.

Any piece of software is nothing else than a set of instructions that need 2 things: computing units to execute on, and a fast access to data.

Computing units are available in the form of a hardware threads located on a processor. The number of threads that a server makes available to the application depends on the number of processors on the server, the number of …

[Read more]
Showing entries 1 to 7