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Displaying posts with tag: Oracle XE (reset)

Oracle and Java Tutorial
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I’m posting this because of a question raised against this older post on how to configure the %CLASSPATH% to find the ojdbc6.jar file. This is the lab file I use in my Database 1 class to expose students to the moving parts of writing Java programs against the Oracle database. That’s why I choose to use a CLOB data type, which requires Oracle’s DBMS_LOB package and wrapping stored procedures.

If you want the same content for MySQL, here’s the link. The full program in either blog entry is available by clicking on the fold/unfold Java Source Code Program widget at the bottom of the respective posts.

This

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Free Oracle PHP Book
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Six years ago, I wrote Oracle Database 10g Express Edition PHP Web Programming for the release of the express edition. It was a lot of fun to write because I enjoy the PHP programming language, but unfortunately sales didn’t measure up too well. That’s probably because the population of PHP developers working with Oracle was small.

Today it seems there are more PHP developers working with Oracle 11g. While the population of PHP community for Oracle 11g is still smaller than for MySQL, it continues to grow

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Single Wildcard Operator
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Somebody wanted to understand why you can backquote a single wildcard operator (that’s the underscore _ character) in MySQL, but can’t in Oracle. The answer is you can in Oracle when you know that you required an additional clause.

While I prefer using regular expression resolution, the LIKE operator is convenient. Here’s an example of backquoting an underscore in MySQL, where it looks for any string with an underscore anywhere in the string:

SELECT   common_lookup_type
FROM     common_lookup
WHERE    common_lookup_type LIKE '%\_%';

You can gain the same behavior in Oracle by appending the ESCAPE '\' clause, like this:

SELECT   common_lookup_type
FROM     common_lookup
WHERE    common_lookup_type LIKE '%\_%' ESCAPE '\';

The ESCAPE '\' clause is one of those

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How to use object types?
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A tale of Oracle SQL object types, their constructors, and how you use them. This demonstrates what you can and can’t do and gives brief explanations about why.

The following creates a base SAMPLE_OBJECT data type and a sample_table
collection of the base SAMPLE_OBJECT data type.

CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE sample_object IS OBJECT
(id       NUMBER
,name     VARCHAR2(30));
/
 
CREATE OR REPLACE TYPE sample_table IS TABLE OF sample_object;
/

If the base SAMPLE_OBJECT data type were a Java object, the default constructor of an empty call parameter list would allow you to construct an instance variable. This doesn’t work for an Oracle object type because the default constructor is a formal parameter list of the object attributes in the positional order of their appearance


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Function or Procedure?
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Somebody asked for a simple comparison between a PL/SQL pass-by-value function and pass-by-reference procedure, where the procedure uses only an OUT mode parameter to return the result. This provides examples of both, but please note that a pass-by-value function can be used in SQL or PL/SQL context while a pass-by-reference procedure can only be used in another anonymous of named block PL/SQL program.

The function and procedure let you calculate the value of a number raised to a power of an exponent. The third parameter lets you convert the exponent value to an inverse value, like 2 to 1/2.

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CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION find_root_function
( pv_number   BINARY_DOUBLE
, pv_power    BINARY_DOUBLE
, pv_inverse  BINARY_INTEGER DEFAULT 0 ) RETURN BINARY_DOUBLE IS
 
  -- Declare local
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Showing entries 1 to 5

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