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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
Fun with Bugs #37 - Bugs fixed in MySQL 5.6.27

MySQL 5.6.27 was released on September 30 formally. Source code is also available on GitHub, and I have it compiled (some users are less lucky) and running for a couple of days already. In this post I'll comment on some bugs reported by MySQL Community that are fixed there.

I'd like to start with a couple of bugs where patches were also contributed. First of all, the fix suggested by Stewart Smith in Bug #72811, "Set NUMA mempolicy for optimum mysqld performance", helps to allocate memory in a more reasonable way on NUMA-enabled systems. Previously it was like all interleaved or nothing, now there is a way to apply this only …

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Create MySQL Index

Indexes are separate data structures that provide alternate pathways to finding data. They can and do generally speed up the processing of queries and other DML commands, like the INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE INTO, and DELETE statements. Indexes are also called fast access paths.

In the scope of the InnoDB Database Engine, the MySQL database maintains the integrity of indexes after you create them. The upside of indexes is that they can improve SQL statement performance. The downside is that they impose overhead on every INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE INTO, and DELETE statement, because the database maintains them by inserting, updating, or deleting items for each related change in the tables that the indexes support.

Indexes have two key properties—usability and visibility. Indexes are both usable and visible by default. That means they …

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Clarification on “Call me Maybe: MariaDB Galera Cluster”

Recently Aphyr (Kyle Kingsbury) published https://aphyr.com/posts/327-call-me-maybe-mariadb-galera-cluster

The article is technically valid, I am not going to dispute a conclusion Aphyr made, but it is also quite technically involved, so users who just jump to conclusion may get the wrong impression and we’re left with more questions than ever.

So, let me state what is the real conclusion of this article:
“Galera cluster does not support SNAPSHOT ISOLATION LEVEL, in contract to what was stated in the documentation”.
Following that conclusion is using Galera cluster may result in “corrupted” data.

I do not quite like the usage of the word “corrupted” here. For me, the more correct word be to use is “inconsistent”.

So with this clarification, the …

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Unexpected Memory Consumption for Bulk Index Creation in InnoDB (MySQL)

In my last Booking.com Hackathon, I worked on MyISAM vs InnoDB for data loading (LOAD DATA IN FILE) and bulk index creation.  My motivation was the following: knowing that some are still using MyISAM for this particular use-case, I wanted to verify/understand if/why InnoDB is slower than MyISAM.  I do not yet have complete results on this specific subject but I found some interesting things that

Advanced Query Tuning in MySQL 5.6 and MySQL 5.7 Webinar: Q&A

Thank you for attending my July 22 webinar titled “Advanced Query Tuning in MySQL 5.6 and 5.7” (my slides and a replay available here). As promised here is the list of questions and my answers (thank you for your great questions).

Q: Here is the explain example:

mysql> explain extended select id, site_id from test_index_id where site_id=1
*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: test_index_id
         type: ref
possible_keys: key_site_id
          key: key_site_id
      key_len: 5
          ref: const
         rows: 1
     filtered: 100.00
        Extra: Using where; Using index

why is site_id a covered index for the query, given the fact that a) we are selecting “id”, b) key_site_id only …

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InnoDB Transparent Page Compression

Astute readers will note that InnoDB already had compression since the MySQL 5.1 plugin. We are using the terminology of ‘Page Compression’ to describe the new offering that will ship with MySQL 5.7, and ‘InnoDB Compression’ for the earlier offering.…

Checkpoint strikes back

In my recent benchmarks for MongoDB, we can see that the two engines WiredTiger and TokuMX struggle from periodical drops in throughput, which is clearly related to a checkpoint interval – and therefore I correspond it to a checkpoint activity.

The funny thing is that I thought we solved checkpointing issues in InnoDB once and for good. There are bunch of posts on this issue in InnoDB, dated some 4 years ago.  We did a lot of research back then working on a fix for Percona Server

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InnoDB vs TokuDB in LinkBench benchmark

Previously I tested Tokutek’s Fractal Trees (TokuMX & TokuMXse) as MongoDB storage engines – today let’s look into the MySQL area.

I am going to use modified LinkBench in a heavy IO-load.

I compared InnoDB without compression, InnoDB with 8k compression, TokuDB with quicklz compression.
Uncompressed datasize is 115GiB, and cachesize is 12GiB for InnoDB and 8GiB + 4GiB OS cache for TokuDB.

Important to note is that I used tokudb_fanout=128, which is only available in our latest Percona Server release.
I …

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Log Buffer #432: A Carnival of the Vanities for DBAs

Yet again, this log buffer edition brings some rich blog posts from Oracle, SQL Server and MySQL.

Oracle:

  • Installing Oracle XE, ORDS and Apex on CentOS
  • Major Growth is Expected in the DBaaS Space. Are Your Skills Ready?
  • How to Hide Actions in OBPM 12c Workspace
  • You can configure auto refresh for ADF BC cached LOV and this works out of the box, no special coding is needed.
  • Search and …
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Using Cgroups to Limit MySQL and MongoDB memory usage

Quite often, especially for benchmarks, I am trying to limit available memory for a database server (usually for MySQL, but recently for MongoDB also). This is usually needed to test database performance in scenarios with different memory limits. I have physical servers with the usually high amount of memory (128GB or more), but I am interested to see how a database server will perform, say if only 16GB of memory is available.

And while InnoDB usually respects the setting of innodb_buffer_pool_size in O_DIRECT mode (OS cache is not being used in this case), more engines (TokuDB for MySQL, MMAP, WiredTiger, RocksDB for MongoDB) usually get benefits from OS cache, and Linux kernel by default is generous enough to allocate as much memory as available. There I should note that while TokuDB (and TokuMX for MongoDB) supports DIRECT mode (that is bypass OS cache), we found there is a performance gain if OS cache is used for compressed pages.

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