Planet MySQL Planet MySQL: Meta Deutsch Español Français Italiano 日本語 Русский Português 中文
10 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 40 of 677 10 Older Entries

Displaying posts with tag: Replication (reset)

MySQL Slave Scaling and more
+3 Vote Up -0Vote Down

Jean-François talks about binlog servers. Take a look here: http://blog.booking.com/mysql_slave_scaling_and_more.html

Using MySQL triggers and views in Amazon RDS
+1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

I recently had an opportunity to migrate a customer from a physical server into Amazon’s RDS environment. In this particular case the customers’ platform makes extensive use of MySQL triggers and views.  I came across two significant issues that prevented me from following Amazon’s documentation, which basically states “use mysqldump” but doesn’t call out a specific method of dealing with MySQL triggers and views.

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a great platform if you’re looking for complete hands-off management of your MySQL environment, but comes at a cost in the area of flexibility, i.e. you don’t have SUPER privilege and this brings up additional challenges.

  • You need to ensure you set log_bin_trust_function_creators=1 ( by default this is off, 0).
  • You need to
  •   [Read more...]
    Replicating Oracle Webinar Question Follow-up
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    We had really great webinar on Replicating to/from Oracle earliest this month, and you can view the recording of that Webinar here.

    A good sign of how great a Webinar was is the questions that come afterwards, and we didn’t get through them all. so here are all the questions and answers for the entire webinar.

    Q: What is the overhead of Replicator on source database with asynchronous CDC?

    A: With asynchronous operation there is no substantial CPU overhead (as with synchronous), but the amount of generated redo logs becomes bigger requiring more disk space and better log management to ensure that the space is used effectively.

    Q: Do you support migration from Solaris/Oracle to Linux/Oracle?

    A: The replication is

      [Read more...]
    Introducing Orchestrator: manage and visualize your MySQL replication topologies and get home for dinner
    +1 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    I'm happy to announce the availability of Outbrain's Orchestrator: MySQL replication management & visualization tool.

    • Orchestrator reads your replication topologies (give it one server - be it master or slave - in each topology, and it will reveal the rest).
    • It keeps a state of this topology.
    • It can continuously poll your servers to get an up to date topology map.
    • It visualizes the topology in a clear and slick D3 tree.
    • It allows you
      [Read more...]
    Semi-sync replication is not slow!
    Employee +2 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    If you read Yoshinori's post about Semi-sync at Facebook, he lists the objective of using semi-sync as an alternative to running full durability on a master. That is to say that once you can guarantee writes have safely been shipped across the network, you may not strictly need to guarantee that they are safe locally.

    This is something that I have been wanting to benchmark for a long time, and reading Jay's post about Semi-sync replication performance in MySQL 5.7 DMR4 and a conversation in last week's #dbhangops inspired me to explore this in more detail. For my tests, I will be using Master-Slave replication and three alternative definitions of

      [Read more...]
    Using deep nested replication topologies
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    If you're running more than a few slaves in a replication topology, you might choose to use deeply nested replication: slaves replicating from other slaves at 2, 3 or even 4 levels. There are pros and cons to such topologies, discussed below.

    A simple, small deep nested topology is depicted below (it is also a real production topology of ours):

    Two slaves, srv-4 and srv-8 act as local masters to yet other slaves. Why would we want to have this complexity?

    Pros

    • Reduce load on master: too many slaves replicating from single master means the master becomes loaded with serving the binary logs.
      [Read more...]
    Fun with Bugs #33 - bugs fixed in MySQL 5.6.19
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    It seems Oracle released MySQL 5.6.19 yesterday. So, it's time to check what community bug reports are fixed there.

    Let's start with InnoDB. We have the following bugs fixed:
    • Bug #72079, "Upgrade from 5.6.10 to 5.6.16 crashes and leaves unusable DB". Honestly I had not noted this bug, even though I upgrade several instances on Windows to each and every release since 5.6.8. Probably because I had no need to use FTS indexes till recently...
    • Bug #71014, about two extra memset calls that are now removed. I hope the patch bug report



      [Read more...]
    MySQL Fabric: Musings on Release 1.4.3
    Employee +2 Vote Up -0Vote Down
    As you might have noticed in the press release, we just released MySQL Utilities 1.4.3, containing MySQL Fabric, as a General Availability (GA) release. This concludes the first chapter of the MySQL Fabric story.

    It all started with the idea that it should be as easy to manage and setup a distributed deployments with MySQL servers as it is to manage the MySQL servers themselves. We also noted that some of the features that were most interesting were sharding and high-availability. Since we also recognized that every user had different needs and needed to customize the solution, we set of to create a framework that would support sharding and high-availability, but also other solutions.

    With the release of 1.4.3, we have a range of features that are now available to the community, and all under

      [Read more...]
    From Percona Server to MySQL and back to Percona Server: beware of crash safe replication info
    +0 Vote Up -0Vote Down

    We're migrating some of our "vanilla" MySQL 5.5 servers to Percona Server 5.5. One of the major incentives is the crash-safe replication feature, allowing slaves to die (power failure) and resume replication without losing position in relay logs.

    Whether or not we will migrate all our servers depends on further benchmarking; so far we've noticed unexpected results, but these are still premature to publish.

    However the fact that we are using both MySQL & Percona Server has led us into a peculiar situation which I'd like to share. We reseed our servers via LVM snapshots. If we need a new machine, or have a corrupted slave, we capture an image of a running slave and duplicate it, a process which takes

      [Read more...]
    Faking a slave: Subscribing to mysql row-based-replication changes
    Employee +0 Vote Up -1Vote Down

    In complex systems it's often useful to be able to receive notification when rows have been modified in MySQL so that you can invalidate various external caches or indexes. For example: memcached, Sphinx, Lucene.

    In the case of MySQL's default statement-based replication this can be quite tricky to do, as it would likely require an SQL parser to determine what was intended to be modified. However, this is made much simpler with Row-based Replication (something I recommend switching to).

    A C++ library exists to be able to listen to MySQL replication, but what I want to demonstrate is that it is also very simple to be able to do this with mysqlbinlog:


    shell> mysqlbinlog

      [Read more...]
    10 Newer Entries Showing entries 31 to 40 of 677 10 Older Entries

    Planet MySQL © 1995, 2014, Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates   Legal Policies | Your Privacy Rights | Terms of Use

    Content reproduced on this site is the property of the respective copyright holders. It is not reviewed in advance by Oracle and does not necessarily represent the opinion of Oracle or any other party.