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Displaying posts with tag: innodb (reset)
MySQL team: make it easy to give you feedback!

There was a bold announcement during the MySQL Keynote at Oracle Open World. A new product that will mix up with the existing GA server, called MySQL InnoDB Cluster. This is an evolution of MySQL group replication, which has been in the labs for long time, and the MySQL shell, which was introduced as a side feature last April. The boldness I mentioned before is on account of wanting to add to a GA server something that was defined as release candidate despite never having been out of the labs. The product is interesting as it promises to be a quick and painless cluster deployment, with built-in high availability and scalability.

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Fun with Bugs #45 - On Some Bugs Fixed in MySQL 5.7.15

Oracle released MySQL 5.7.15 recently, earlier than expected. The reason for this "unexpected" release is not clear to me, but it could happen because of a couple of security related internal bug reports that got fixed:

  • "It was possible to write log files ending with .ini or .cnf that later could be parsed as option files. The general query log and slow query log can no longer be written to a file ending with .ini or .cnf. (Bug #24388753)
  • Privilege escalation was possible by exploiting the way REPAIR TABLE used temporary files. (Bug #24388746)"

Let me concentrate on the most important fixes to bugs and problems reported by Community users. …

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Exposing Innodb Internals via System Variables: Part 5, Consistency / Statistics handling

Introduction

This is the final installment of a five part blog series to explore InnoDB internals by looking at the related tunable system variables. In this section we’re going to cover variables that relate to enforcing data consistency, and how index statistics are handled and stored.

Just like previous sections, I would like to emphasize something that was written in part one of this blog post series.

I should note that while tuning recommendations are provided, this objective of this blog post series was NOT meant to be a tuning primer, but instead to explore the mechanics that each variable interacts with. As such I would like to advise against reading this guide and trying to fine tune all of the available InnoDB variables. System variable tuning is an exercise in diminishing returns, the most benefit you’ll get out of tuning your MySQL server will occur within the first 15 minutes of configuration. In …

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InnoDB Troubleshooting: Q & A

In this blog, I will provide answers to the Q & A for the InnoDB Troubleshooting webinar.

First, I want to thank everybody for attending the August 11 webinar. The recording and slides for the webinar are available here. Below is the list of your questions that I wasn’t able to answer during the webinar, with responses:

Q: What’s a good speed for buffer pool speed/size for maximum query performance?

A: I am sorry, I don’t quite understand the question. InnoDB buffer pool is an in-memory buffer. In an ideal case, your whole active dataset (rows that are accessed by application regularly) should be in the buffer pool. There is a good …

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Exposing Innodb Internals via System Variables: Part 4, Concurrency

Introduction

This is part four of a five part blog series to explore InnoDB internals by looking at the related tunable system variables. In this section we’re going to explore the mechanics that impact CPU resourcing and how InnoDB handles concurrent threads. You’ll notice that a lot of the variables covered in section relate to features that are now disabled but were a lot more prevalent in previous versions of MySQL, particularly those that were released at a time where system context switching had a greater cost than it does today. These variables are still worth discussing as you may run into older systems that utilize these mechanics, and there are even modern systems I’ve worked with that have implemented these features to tune performance to its highest potential.

Just like previous sections, I would like to emphasize something that was written in part one of this blog post series.

“I should note that …

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Exposing Innodb Internals via System Variables: Part 3, I/O (Table data)

Introduction

This is part three of a five part blog series to explore InnoDB internals by looking at the related tunable system variables. In part 2 we covered variables that had the greatest impact on the file structure of InnoDB as well as how data is written to logs. In this section we will continue looking at I/O but more specifically looking at the mechanics on how data gets written to table files as well as how background threads read from them.

Just like in part two, I would like to emphasize something that was written in part one of this blog post series.

“I should note that while tuning recommendations are provided, this objective of this blog post series was NOT meant to be a tuning primer, but instead to explore the mechanics that each variable interacts with. As such I would …

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Percona Server 5.7.14-7 is now available

Percona announces the GA release of Percona Server 5.7.14-7 on August 23, 2016. Download the latest version from the Percona web site or the Percona Software Repositories.

Based on MySQL 5.7.14, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.7.14-7 is the current GA release in the Percona Server 5.7 series. Percona’s provides completely open-source and free software. Find release details in the …

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Percona Server 5.5.51-38.1 is now available

Percona announces the release of Percona Server 5.5.51-38.1 on August 19, 2016. Based on MySQL 5.5.51, including all the bug fixes in it, Percona Server 5.5.51-38.1 is now the current stable release in the 5.5 series.

Percona Server is open-source and free. You can find release details of the release in the 5.5.51-38.1 milestone on Launchpad. Downloads are available here and from the Percona Software Repositories.

Bugs Fixed: …

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Exposing Innodb Internals via System Variables: Part 1, Memory

Introduction

A couple of months ago I decided to give myself a refresher on the mechanics of InnoDB. Having a high level understanding of what’s going on under the hood can help provide the context needed in order to resolve issues you may encounter as well as assist you in ensuring that your MySQL instance is running efficiently. Everyone can stand to go back to basics every now and then, as it can help you pick up concepts that you may have missed the last time you researched the topic.

This time around I decided to give myself a refresher by re-reading the MySQL 5.6 reference manual, chapter 14, which covers the InnoDB engine. Despite having a wealth of documented knowledge and insights, I found that a lot of the points in the documentations were unclear, leading me to do more research and experimentation in order to get a bit of clarity on some of the specifics that I felt were missing. In order to help make the information …

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Small innodb_page_size as a performance boost for SSD

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how a small innodb_page_size can create a performance boost for SSD.

In my previous post Testing Samsung storage in tpcc-mysql benchmark of Percona Server I compared different Samsung devices. Most solid state drives (SSDs) use 4KiB as an internal page size, and the InnoDB default page size is 16KiB. I wondered how using a different innodb_page_size might affect the overall performance.

Fortunately, MySQL 5.7 comes with the option innodb_page_size, so you can set different InnoDB page sizes than the standard 16KiB. This option is still quite inconvenient to use, however. You can’t change innodb_page_size for the existing database. Instead, you need to create a brand new database with a …

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