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Displaying posts with tag: Thread pool (reset)
Percona Server: Thread Pool Improvements for Transactional Workloads

In a previous thread pool post, I mentioned that in Percona Server we used an open source implementation of MariaDB’s thread pool, and enhanced/improved it further. Below I would like to describe some of these improvements for transactional workloads.

When we were evaluating MariaDB’s thread pool implementation, we observed that it improves scalability for AUTOCOMMIT statements. However, it does not scale well with multi-statement transactions. The UPDATE_NO_KEY test which was run as an AUTOCOMMIT statement and inside a transaction gave the following results:

After analysis, we identified the major cause of that inefficiency: …

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SimCity outages, traffic control and Thread Pool for MySQL

For this post I’m going to shamelessly exploit the litany of technical problems SimCity players encountered earlier this month and a few examples of how Thread Pool for MySQL and Percona Server for MySQL can help to prevent such incidents.

Users of SimCity, a city-building and urban planning simulation video game, encountered network outages, issues with saving progress and problems connecting to the game’s servers following a new release a couple of weeks ago featuring a new engine allowing for more detailed simulation than previous games. During this same time, we happened to be testing the Thread Pool feature in Percona Server for MySQL, and I saw a connection of how Thread Pool is supposed to help in such cases.

Basically SimCity users faced the same situation …

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MariaDB-5.5 Thread Pool Performance

MariaDB-5.5.21-beta is the first MariaDB release featuring the new thread pool. Oracle offers a commercial thread pool plugin for MySQL Enterprise, but now MariaDB brings a thread pool implementation to the community!

If you are not familiar with the term, please read the Knowledge Base article about it.

The main design goal of the thread pool is to increase the scalability of the MariaDB server with many concurrent connections. In order to test and demonstrate this, I have run the sysbench OLTP RO benchmark with up to 4096 threads to compare the new pool-of-threads and the traditional thread-per-connection scheduler:

Benchmark description:

  • sysbench multi table OLTP, readonly
  • 16 tables, totaling 40 mio …
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Announcing new features in MariaDB

We have lately been talking about some upcoming features that we feel are important to MariaDB users, because the corresponding ones that will be provided with MySQL will be incompatible with MariaDB and closed source.

We’re happy to announce the following:

  • The next version of MariaDB, version 5.2.10 will include an open source PAM Authentication Plugin. MariaDB 5.2.10 is scheduled for release next week.
  • A Windows Authentication Plugin is in development and QA currently and will be part of MariaDB 5.2.11, which is scheduled for release before Christmas.
  • MariaDB 5.5 will include both of the above plugins and an open source thread pool implementation. The soon-to-be-launched first version however will not include the thread pool.

Stay tuned for more information as soon as we start …

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MySQL Thread Pool vs. Connection Pool

Given that thread and connections in the MySQL Server
have been so intertwined, it is easy to confuse the
purpose of the MySQL Thread Pool and the purpose of
a Connection Pool.

The aim of a Connection Pool is that the MySQL
clients should not be forced to constantly do connect and
disconnect. Thus it is possible to cache a connection in
the MySQL client when a user of the connection no longer
needs it. Thus another user that needs a connection to the
same MySQL Server can reuse this cached connection later on.

This saves execution time in both the client and the server.
It does however not change the dynamics of how many queries
are executed in parallel in the MySQL Server. This means that
the likelihood of too many concurrent queries to execute in
the MySQL Server is the same with or without a Connection
Pool.

Also a …

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MySQL Limitations Part 4: One thread per connection

This is the third in a series on what’s seriously limiting MySQL in core use cases (links: part 1, 2, 3). This post is about the way MySQL handles connections, allocating one thread per connection to the server.

MySQL is a single process with multiple threads. Not all databases are architected this way; some have multiple processes that communicate through shared memory or other means. It's cheap to create a connection to MySQL, because it just requires creating a thread (or taking one from a cache). This is generally so fast that there isn't really the need for connection pools as …

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Showing entries 1 to 6