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Displaying posts with tag: innodb buffer pool (reset)
Worrying about the ‘InnoDB: detected cycle in LRU for buffer pool (…)’ message?

If you use Percona Server 5.5 and you have configured it to use multiple buffer pool instances than sooner or later you’ll see the following lines on the server’s error log and chances are you’ll be worried about them:

InnoDB: detected cycle in LRU for buffer pool 5, skipping to next buffer pool.
InnoDB: detected cycle in LRU for buffer pool 3, skipping to next buffer pool.
InnoDB: detected cycle in LRU for buffer pool 7, skipping to next buffer pool.

Worry not as this is mostly harmless. It’s becoming a February tradition for me (Fernando) to face a question about this subject (ok, it’s maybe a coincidence) and this time I’ve teamed up with my dear colleague and software engineer George Lorch to provide you the most complete blog post ever published on this topic(with a belated thank you! to Ernie Souhrada, with whom I’ve also discussed this same …

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How well does your table fit in the InnoDB buffer pool in MySQL 5.6+?

Some time ago, Peter Zaitsev posted a blog titled “How well does your table fits in innodb buffer pool?” He used some special INFORMATION_SCHEMA tables developed for Percona Server 5.1 to report how much of each InnoDB table and index resides in your buffer pool.

As Peter pointed out, you can use this view into the buffer pool to watch a buffer pool warm up with pages as you run queries. You can also use it for capacity planning. If you expect some tables need to be fully loaded in the buffer pool to be used efficiently, but the buffer pool isn’t large enough to hold them, then it’s time to increase the size of the buffer pool.

The problem, however, was that system tables change from version to version. Specifically, the INNODB_BUFFER_POOL_PAGES_INDEX table no longer exists in Percona Server 5.6, and the …

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InnoDB crash recovery speed in MySQL 5.6

It has been a while since I have looked at InnoDB crash recovery. A lot has change in the last few years – we have serious crash recovery performance improvements in MySQL 5.5 and MySQL 5.6, we have solid state drives raising as typical high performance IO subsystem and we also have the ability to set much larger log files and often have a much larger InnoDB Buffer Pool to work with.

First let me revisit the challenge with have with InnoDB configuration. For write-intensive workloads it is extremely important to size innodb_log_file_size for good performance, however the longer log file size you have the longer you might have to wait for InnoDB to complete crash recovery, which impacts your recovery strategy.

How much can innodb_log_file_size impact performance? Massively! Doing intensive writes to a database that well fits in memory, I’d say there’s a 10x

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InnoDB’s multi-versioning handling can be Achilles’ heel

I believe InnoDB storage engine architecture is great for a lot of online workloads, however, there are no silver bullets in technology and all design choices have their trade offs. In this blog post I’m going to talk about one important InnoDB limitation that you should consider.

InnoDB is a multiversion concurrency control (MVCC) storage engine which means many versions of the single row can exist at the same time. In fact there can be a huge amount of such row versions. Depending on the isolation mode you have chosen, InnoDB might have to keep all row versions going back to the earliest active read view, but at the very least it will have to keep all versions going back to the start of SELECT query which is currently running.

In most cases this is not a big deal – if you have many short transactions happening you will have only a few row versions to deal with. If you just use the system for reporting queries but do not …

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About InnoDB’s: Shortened warm-up times with a preloaded InnoDB buffer pool

This comment is in regard to this InnoDB blog page. Trying to post a message says you need to be logged in, but there’s no register/login page I could see…

Anyway the page talks about a new feature which allows you to save on shutdown an InnoDB buffer pool and to load this on startup, this ensuring that once loaded the database will perform with this “hot” cache.

That sounds interesting as I have seen on numerous occasions that if the buffer pool is not warm then performance can be a magnitude worse.

This looks like a very welcome feature. However, a couple of things are not clear to me.

  1. Having some example benchmark times of using this process and comparing it to trying to warm up the buffer pool by hand would be useful.  While this may heavily dependent on database …
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Tuning InnoDB Configuration

I had earlier written a post on tuning the MySQL server configuration which was more geared towards the MyISAM storage engine. While that is not because I didn't intend on ignoring InnoDB but because I had planned a whole post on tuning InnoDB related configuration. So this post is the post that I had planned, I have discussed the major configuration parameters in here that should help you out most of the times.

Showing entries 1 to 6