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Showing entries 1 to 9

Displaying posts with tag: database virtualization (reset)

Why You Should Embrace Database Virtualization
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This article addresses the benefits provided from database virtualization. Before we proceed however, it is important to explain that database virtualization does NOT mean simply running a DBMS inside a virtual machine.

Database Virtualization, More Than Running a DBMS in a Virtual MachineWhile running a DBMS in a VM can provide advantages (and disadvantages) it is NOT database virtualization. Typical databases fuse together the data (or I/O) with the processing (CPU utilization) to operate as a single unit. Simply running that single unit in a VM does not provide the benefits detailed below. That is not database virtualization that is …

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Why You Should Embrace Database Virtualization
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This article addresses the benefits provided from database virtualization. Before we proceed however, it is important to explain that database virtualization does NOT mean simply running a DBMS inside a virtual machine.

Database Virtualization, More Than Running a DBMS in a Virtual Machine While running a DBMS in a VM can provide advantages (and disadvantages) it is NOT database virtualization. Typical databases fuse together the data (or I/O) with the processing (CPU utilization) to operate as a single unit. Simply running that single unit in a VM …

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Database Virtualization, What it Really Means
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This is a response to a blog postby analyst and marketing consultant Curt Monash.

Originally virtualization meant running one operating system in a window inside of another operating system, e.g. running a Linux on a Windows machine using Microsoft Virtual PC or VMWare. Then virtualization evolved to mean slicing a single server into many for more granular resource allocation (Curt’s ex uno plures, translated: out of one, many). It has since expanded to …

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Database Virtualization, What it Really Means
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This is a response to a blog postby analyst and marketing consultant Curt Monash.


Originally virtualization meant running one operating system in a window inside of another operating system, e.g. running a Linux on a Windows machine using Microsoft Virtual PC or VMWare. Then virtualization evolved to mean slicing a single server into many for more granular resource allocation (Curt’s ex uno plures, translated: out of one, many). It has since expanded to include e pluribus unum (from many, one) and e pluribus ad …


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NetworkWorld: How Mozilla keeps its MySQL database tidy
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MySQL database management tool ScaleBase virtualizes MySQL database, spreading database load into smaller bite-size chunks As an open source company, Mozilla developers make a lot of different versions of software code each day, and part of Sheeri Cabral’s job to keep track of them all: which ones work, which don’t, how many times they’ve been downloaded, and which have a [...] Read More

Lack of Business Visibility Cripples Traditional SQL DaaS, Drives NewSQL
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More and more public cloud companies are moving to managed cloud services to improve their value-add (price premium) and the stickiness of their solution. However, the shift to a database as a service (DaaS) severely reduces the DBAs visibility into the business, thus limiting the ability to hand tune the database to the requirements of the application and the database. The solution is a cloud database that eliminates the hand-tuning of the database, thereby enabling the DBA to be equally effective even with limited visibility into the business and application needs. It is these unique needs, particularly for SQL databases, that is fueling the NewSQL …

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Cloud DaaS Managed Service Fuels NewSQL Market
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As public clouds are commoditized, the public cloud vendors are increasingly moving to higher margin and stickier managed services. In the early days of the public cloud, renting compute and storage was unique, exciting, sticky and profitable. It has quickly become a commodity. In order to provide differentiation, maintain margins and create barriers to customer exit, against increasing competition, the cloud is moving toward a collection of managed services.
Public clouds are growing beyond simple compute instances to platform as a service (PaaS). PaaS is then comprised of various modules, including database as a service (DaaS). In the early …

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Database Architectures & Performance II
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As described in the prior post, the shared-disk performance dilemma is simple:

1. If each node stores/processes data in memory, versus disk, it is much faster.
2. Each node must expose the most recent data to the other nodes, so those other nodes are not using old data.

In other words, #1 above says flush data to disk VERY INFREQUENTLY for better performance, while #2 says flush everything to disk IMMEDIATELY for data consistency.

Oracle recognized this dilemma when they built Oracle Parallel …






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Virtual Databases: The Face of the New Cloud Database
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Shared-disk databases can be virtualized—making them cloud-friendly—while shared-nothing databases are tied to a specific computer and a specific data set or data partition.

The underlying principle of the shared-nothing RDBMS is that a single master server owns its specific set of data. That data is not shared, hence the name shared-nothing. Because there is no ability to share the data, there is also no ability to virtualize the computing of that data. Instead the shared-nothing RDBMS ties the data and the computing to a specific computer. This association with a physical machine is then reinforced at the application level. …

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Showing entries 1 to 9

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