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Displaying posts with tag: Amazon RDS (reset)
Amazon RDS and pt-online-schema-change

In this blog post, I discuss some of the insights needed when using Amazon RDS and pt-online-schema-change together.

The pt-online-schema-change tool runs DDL queries (ALTER) online so that the table is not locked for reads and writes. It is a commonly used tool by community users and customers. Using it on Amazon RDS requires knowing about some specific details. First, a high-level explanation of how the tool works.

This is an example from the documentation:

pt-online-schema-change --alter "ADD COLUMN c1 INT" D=sakila,t=actor

The tool runs an ALTER on the table “actor” from the database “sakila.” The alter adds a column named “c1” of type …

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MySQL encrypted streaming backups directly into AWS S3


Cloud storage is becoming more and more popular for offsite storage and DR solutions for many businesses. This post will help with those people that want to perform this process for MySQL backups directly into Amazon S3 Storage. These steps can probably also be adapted for other processes that may not be MySQL oriented.


In order to perform this task we need to be able to stream the data, encrypt it, and then upload it to S3. There are a number of ways to do each step and I will try and dive into multiple examples so that way you can mix and match the solution to your desired results.  The AWS S3 CLI tools that I will be using to do the upload also allows encryption but to try and get these steps open for customization, I am going to do the encryption in the stream.

  1. Stream MySQL backup
  2. Encrypt the stream
  3. Upload the stream to AWS S3

Step 1 : …

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Amazon RDS Migration Tool

Amazon has just released their RDS Migration Tool, and Pythian has recently undertaken training to use for our clients. I wanted to share my initial thoughts on the tool, give some background on its internals, and provide a walk-through on the functionality it will be most commonly used for.

There are many factors to consider when evaluating cloud service providers, including cost, performance, and high availability and disaster recovery options. One of the most critical and overlooked elements of any cloud offering though, is the ease of migration. Often, weeks are spent evaluating all of the options only to discover after the choice is made that it will take hours of expensive downtime to complete the migration, and that there is no good rollback option in the case of failure.

In order to reduce the friction inherent in the move to a DBaaS offering, Amazon has developed an RDS Migration tool. This is an in-depth look at this new …

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Using MySQL Event Scheduler and how to prevent contention

MySQL introduced the Event Scheduler in version 5.1.6. The Event Scheduler is a MySQL-level “cron job”, which will run events inside MySQL. Up until now, this was not a very popular feature, however, it has gotten more popular since the adoption of Amazon RDS – as well as similar MySQL database as a service offerings where there is no OS level.

What is important to understand about the Event Scheduler is that it does not have any protection against multiple execution (neither does linux cron). Let’s imagine you have created an event that executes every 10 seconds, but the logic inside the event (i.e. queries or stored procedure call) can …

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Percona Toolkit for MySQL with MySQL-SSL Connections

I recently had a client ask me how to use Percona Toolkit tools with an SSL connection to MySQL (MySQL-SSL). SSL connections aren’t widely used in MySQL due to most installations being within an internal network. Still, there are cases where you could be accessing MySQL over public internet or even over a public “private” network (ex: WAN between two colo datacenters). In order to keep packet sniffers at bay, the connection to MySQL should be encrypted.

If you are connecting to Amazon RDS from home or office (ie: not within the AWS network) you better be encrypted!

As there is already a MySQL Performance Blog post on how to setup MySQL SSL connections, we can skip that and dive right in.

As you probably know, the mysql client …

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What I learned while migrating a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS

Hi, I recently had the experience of assisting with a migration of a customer MySQL installation to Amazon RDS (Relational Database Service). Amazon RDS is a great platform for hosting your MySQL installation and offers the following list of pros and cons:

  • You can scale your CPU, IOPS, and storage space separately by using Amazon RDS. Otherwise you need to take downtime and upgrade physical components of a rack-mounted server.
  • Backups, software version patching, failure detection, and (some) recovery is automated with Amazon RDS.
  • You lose shell access to your DB instance
  • You lose SUPER privilege for regular users. Many SUPER-type statements and commands are provided for as a Stored Procedure.
  • It is easy to set up multiple read replicas (slaves in READ_ONLY=1 mode).
  • You can set up a secondary sychronous …
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DBaaS, OpenStack and Trove 101: Introduction to the basics

We’ll be publishing a series of posts on OpenStack and Trove over the next few weeks, diving into their usage and purpose. For readers who are already familiar with these technologies, there should be no doubt as to why we are incredibly excited about them, but for those who aren’t, consider this a small introduction to the basics and concepts.

What is Database as a Service (DBaaS)?
In a nutshell, DBaaS – as it is frequently referred to – is a loose moniker to the concept of providing a managed cloud-based database environment accessible by users, applications or developers. Its aim is to provide a full-fledged database environment, while minimizing the administrative turmoil and pains of managing the surrounding infrastructure.

Real life example: Imagine you are working on a new application that has to be accessible from multiple regions. Building and maintaining a large multiregion …

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TIMESTAMP Columns, Amazon RDS 5.6, and You

This comes from an issue that I worked on recently, wherein a customer reported that their application was working fine under stock MySQL 5.6 but producing erroneous results when they tried running it on Amazon RDS 5.6. They had a table which, on the working server, contained two TIMESTAMP columns, one which defaulted to CURRENT_TIMESTAMP and the other which defaulted to ’0000-00-00 00:00:00′, like so:

CREATE TABLE mysql56 (
  ts2 TIMESTAMP NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',

However, under Amazon RDS, the same table looked like this:


They mentioned that their schema contains TIMESTAMP column definitions without any modifiers for nullability or …

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Using MySQL triggers and views in Amazon RDS

I recently had an opportunity to migrate a customer from a physical server into Amazon’s RDS environment. In this particular case the customers’ platform makes extensive use of MySQL triggers and views.  I came across two significant issues that prevented me from following Amazon’s documentation, which basically states “use mysqldump” but doesn’t call out a specific method of dealing with MySQL triggers and views.

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a great platform if you’re looking for complete hands-off management of your MySQL environment, but comes at a cost in the area of flexibility, i.e. you don’t have SUPER privilege and this brings up additional challenges.

  1. You need to ensure you set log_bin_trust_function_creators=1 ( by default this is off, 0).
  2. You need to clean up your mysqldump syntax.

#1 is easy, you simply make a configuration change …

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Running MySQL 5.6 on Amazon RDS: Webinar followup questions answered

Thanks to everyone who attended last week’s webinar, Running MySQL 5.6 on Amazon RDS.” If you weren’t able to attend, the recording and slides are available for viewing/download (or, if you were able to attend and just want to see it again). I’ve also answered the questions I didn’t have a chance to field during the event:

Q: Would you recommend Amazon RDS over manually setting up MySQL/Percona server on an EC2 instance?
A: This depends on many factors including your data set size, workload, uptime requirements, what the rest of your stack looks like, and many other factors.

Q: At Q&A time, can you go more into 5.6 InnoDB full text search vs the Amazon search offering? …

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