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Displaying posts with tag: hdlatency (reset)

innodb_flush_logs_on_trx_commit and Galera Cluster
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We deploy Galera Cluster (in MariaDB) for some clients, and innodb_flush_logs_on_trx_commit is one of the settings we’ve been playing with. The options according to the manual:

  • =0 don’t write or flush at commit, write and flush once per second
  • =1 write and flush at trx commit
  • =2 write log, but only flush once per second

The flush (fsync) refers to the mechanism the filesystem uses to try and guarantee that written data is actually on the physical medium/device and not just in a buffer (of course cached RAID controllers, SANs and other devices use some different logic …

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HDlatency – now with quick option
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I’ve done a minor update to the hdlatency tool (get it from Launchpad), it now has a –quick option to have it only do its tests with 16KB blocks rather than a whole range of sizes. This is much quicker, and 16KB is the InnoDB page size so it’s the most relevant for MySQL/MariaDB deployments.

However, I didn’t just remove the other stuff, because it can be very helpful in tracking down problems and putting misconceptions to rest. On SANs (and local RAID of course) you have things like block sizes and stripe sizes, and opinions on what might be faster. Interestingly, the real world doesn’t always agree …

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Measuring HD latency in ways relevant to MySQL
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As I described yesterday, Open Query is doing some tests on SSDs and other devices pretending to be harddisks (SANs, battery-backed RAID controllers, etc). To aid this, I wrote a small tool to test the different kind of I/O operations MySQL would/could do, which is not quite the same as what other general purpose apps would do, and also not what other test tools measure. For instance, it tries Direct I/O as well as fsync() after each write, and also it a range of different I/O block sizes.

In a nutshell, it’s aimed to do what MySQL does, without MySQL! Testing lots of different setups for …

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Showing entries 1 to 3

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